Ecogardening to Reduce Carbon Footprint

747
-1

Published on

Tips for gardeners about reducing their carbon footprint in their gardens

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
747
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
29
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ecogardening to Reduce Carbon Footprint

  1. 1. Ecogardening:Reduce Your Carbon Footprint<br />Linda R McMahan<br />Oregon State University Extension Horticulturist & Botanist<br />linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu<br />
  2. 2. Program & Goals <br />Fun fact quiz<br />Effects of predicted climate changes on Western Oregon gardens<br />Sustainable practices for gardeners<br />Questions, Comments, & Feedback<br />
  3. 3. Climate Change and Gardens<br />Quiz<br />
  4. 4. What potential percentage of energy use can you save by planting deciduous trees to shade your home?<br />5%<br />15%<br />30%<br />50%<br />
  5. 5. What potential percentage of energy use can you save by planting deciduous trees to shade your home?<br />5%<br />15%<br />30%<br />50%<br />
  6. 6. In Oregon, planting deciduous trees to shade a home has the potential to save:<br />$25 per year<br />$50 per year<br />$100 per year<br />$175 per year<br />
  7. 7. In Oregon, planting deciduous trees to shade a home has the potential to save:<br />$25 per year<br />$50 per year<br />$100 per year<br />$175 per year<br />
  8. 8. Percentage of world power used by the United States? (We are about 5% of world population)<br />5%<br />15%<br />25%<br />40%<br />http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/<br />commons/0/0a/World_population_pie_chart.PNG<br />
  9. 9. Percentage of world power used by the United States? (We are about 5% of world population)<br />5%<br />15%<br />25%<br />40%<br />http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/<br />commons/0/0a/World_population_pie_chart.PNG<br />
  10. 10. True or False<br />Predicted climate change in our area includes warmer average annual temperatures <br />
  11. 11. True or False<br />Predicted climate change in our area includes warmer average annual temperatures <br />True<br />
  12. 12. True of False<br />Predicted climate change in our area would mean wetter winters with more storm runoff and increased flooding <br />
  13. 13. True of False<br />Predicted climate change in our area would mean wetter winters with more storm runoff and increased flooding <br />True<br />
  14. 14. What percentage of the “waste stream” typically discarded could be kept “at home” for use in the garden?<br />5%<br />22%<br />34%<br />63%<br />
  15. 15. What percentage of the “waste stream” typically discarded could be kept “at home” for use in the garden?<br />5%<br />22%<br />34%<br />63%<br />
  16. 16. In the U.S., fresh produce travels an estimated average “food miles” of:<br />50 miles<br />150 miles<br />750 miles<br />1500 miles<br />
  17. 17. In the U.S., fresh produce travels an estimated average “food miles” of:<br />50 miles<br />150 miles<br />750 miles<br />1500 miles<br />
  18. 18. Of the following activities to acquire fresh produce, which one typically uses the most energy per item?<br />The trip to and from the grocery store<br />Energy required to get produce from the farmer to the grocery store<br />Energy used to grow fresh produce at home<br />
  19. 19. Of the following activities to acquire fresh produce, which one typically uses the most energy per item?<br />The trip to and from the grocery store<br />Energy required to get produce from the farmer to the grocery store<br />Energy used to grow fresh produce at home<br />
  20. 20. The most energy-intensive part of a typical home landscape is:<br />A vegetable garden<br />Annual and perennial borders<br />The lawn<br />The trees<br />
  21. 21. The most energy-intensive part of a typical home landscape is:<br />A vegetable garden<br />Annual and perennial borders<br />The lawn<br />The trees<br />
  22. 22. Produce flown by air consumes how much more energy than shipping by sea?<br />14%<br />24%<br />44%<br />144%<br />
  23. 23. Produce flown by air consumes how much more energy than shipping by sea?<br />14%<br />24%<br />44%<br />144%<br />
  24. 24. Effects of Possible Climate Changes in Western Oregon<br />Effect<br />Consequence<br />
  25. 25. What gardeners can do!<br />Reduce use of fossil fuels<br />Recycle and compost<br />Limit consumption<br />Use common sense<br />Protect the soil<br />Reduce water use<br />Work with nature<br />Create communities of gardeners<br />
  26. 26. Some General Rules for Gardens and Landscapes<br />An energy-intensive landscape<br />A low-energy-use landscape<br />
  27. 27. If your practices and purchases use fossil fuels, consider using alternative methods<br />Transportation<br />Manufacture<br />Materials<br />Lifetime of Use<br />Direct Fuel Use<br />
  28. 28. Use the Power of the Sun<br />Plant trees—they provide shade and moderate temperatures<br />Deciduous trees on the south and west sides of house provide cooling influence in summer and let heat through in winter<br />Use solar lighting if practical<br />Shrubs, lawns, and other vegetation also cools, shades, and protects from wind<br />
  29. 29. Go WaterWise<br />Saves water for drinking, agriculture, or wildlife <br />Creates beautiful landscapes<br />Uses fewer chemicals because plants are better adapted<br />Less water means less expended energy for water storage, delivery, and infrastructure <br />penstemon<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/eco-gardening<br />
  30. 30. For WaterWise Plants, Choose:<br />Plants from Mediterranean regions of the world, including California<br />US prairie natives like sunflower<br />Pacific Northwest native plants <br />Grevillia rosemarifolia<br />California fuchsia<br />Cistus<br />sunflower<br />
  31. 31. Use Native Plants<br />Native plants are already adapted to our climate<br />Many different choices are available<br />Most support local birds, butterflies and other wildlife<br />Mock orange<br />Wild strawberrry<br />Ceanothus<br />
  32. 32. Build a Rain Garden<br />Photo: Rob Emanuel, OSU Extension<br />
  33. 33. Think Local<br />Plants & seeds grown locally<br />Native plants grown locally<br />Local products, local sources<br />Nurture native wildlife<br />Control invasive plants and animals in the garden<br />Iris tenax, a local native plant<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/controlling-invasive-plants<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/eco-gardening/native-plant-gardening<br />
  34. 34. Think Local, Think Wildlife<br />Plant a Native Plant Garden--Reduce erosion, conserve water, encourage wildlife, lower maintenance<br />
  35. 35. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle . . . . <br />Buy used and/or buy sturdy, organize swaps or trades<br />Save seeds<br />Share resources with neighbors<br />Compost at home or use leaves as mulch <br />Use manual methods when you can<br />
  36. 36. Learn from Nature<br />In a natural forest, no one rakes up the leaves, and plants still grow and flourish<br />Mimic nature by “composting in place”<br />This practice reduces the need for adding fertilizers and mulch, saving money and energy <br />
  37. 37. Grow Your Own<br />Know your food<br />Save transportation costs<br />Create family and community activities<br />Live with the seasons<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/gardening/<br />
  38. 38. Work Together for Greater Impact<br />Save resources through sharing tools, equipment, plants, and garden space<br />Create a community garden<br />Help each other understand how our actions affect the world’s ecosystems and climate<br />Create a new “look” for your community, maybe not so “tidy”<br />
  39. 39. A Special Word About Lawns<br />Leave grass clippings on the lawn to reduce or eliminate fertilizer – “Grasscycling”<br />Use manual equipment when this is practical, with electric-powered being the next choice<br />Once established, let the lawn evolve on its own –perfect turf in Oregon and Washington is a rarity<br />Limit chemical use and seek alternatives to chemicals<br />
  40. 40. Turf Replacement Strategies<br />Plants<br />Permeable surfaces<br />
  41. 41. Be Creative: Use your garden to reduce overall energy use<br />Use a clothes line<br />Build arbors and pergolas for additional shade & wind breaks<br />Create wind breaks with evergreen shrubs<br />
  42. 42. Go Easy on the Chemical Inputs<br />Use alternatives to herbicides such as hand weeding<br />Stop and Think: Is there a better way?<br />Nurture Your Soil—it will reward you in return<br />Be tolerant of imperfection and respect natural processes<br />If needed, consider using natural fertilizers like cottonseed meal or fish emulsion fertilizer<br />
  43. 43. Support Pollinators & Other Beneficial Creatures<br />Beneficial organisms include bees, butterflies, birds, insects, reptiles & amphibians <br />Encourage garden biodiversity through care of the soil and limiting chemical inputs<br />
  44. 44. Take the Landscape Sustainability Checkup<br />Landscape Sustainability Checkup<br />Is your yard ready to be an<br />“Oregon Sustainable Landscape”?<br />• Score at least 50 on the checklist to find out.<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/douglas/sites/default/files/documents/hort/lscheckup.pdf<br />
  45. 45. Sustainability Checkup<br />Water Efficiency, Water Runoff <br />Mulch, Fertilizer<br />Recycle<br />Wildlife<br />Yard Pest Control<br />Right Plant Right Place <br />Presence/Control of Invasives<br />Streams – Special Care<br />
  46. 46. Recognize and Create Sustainable Landscapes<br /> A mix of plants and plant communities encourages a diversity of plants and animals in a typical landscape<br />
  47. 47. What we do in our gardens affects people and ecosystems elsewhere, from our energy use, to what runs off with rainwater or escapes in the air. We cannot draw a bubble around our homes and gardens and live in isolation—it just doesn’t work that way.<br />Thank You!!<br />linda.mcmahan@oregonstate.edu<br />http://extension.oregonstate.edu/yamhill/eco-gardening<br />
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×