Celebrating world breast feeding week(1 st aug 7th

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Celebrating world breast feeding week(1 st aug 7th

  1. 1. CELEBRATING WORLDBREAST FEEDING WEEK(1STAUG- 7TH AUG) PRESENTED BY: DEPARTMENT OF OBSTETRICS & CHILD HEALTH NURSING JINSAR, JABALPUR
  2. 2. WORLD BREASTFEEDINGWEEKAUGUST 1ST- 7TH 2012
  3. 3. World Breastfeeding Week is celebratedevery year from 1 to 7 August in morethan 170 countries to encouragebreastfeeding and improve the health ofbabies around the world. Itcommemorates the Innocenti Declarationmade by WHO and UNICEF policy-makers in August 1990 to protect,promote and support breastfeeding.
  4. 4. WORLD ALLIANCE FORBREASTFEEDING ACTION (WABA)
  5. 5. The World Alliance for BreastfeedingAction (WABA) was formed on 14February, 1991. WABA is a global networkof organizations and individuals whobelieve breastfeeding is the right of allchildren and mothers and who dedicatethemselves to protect, promote and supportthis right. WABA acts on the InnocentiDeclaration and works in close liaison withUNICEF.
  6. 6. VISION A world where breastfeeding is thecultural norm, where mothers andfamilies are enabled to feed and careoptimally for their infants and youngchildren thus contributing to a just andhealthy society.
  7. 7. MISSIONTo protect, promote and support breast-feeding worldwide in the framework of theInnocenti Declarations (1990 and 2005) andthe Global Strategy for Infant and YoungChild Feeding through networking andfacilitating collaborative efforts in socialmobilisation, advocacy, information dissemi-nation and capacity building.
  8. 8. GOALTo foster a strong and cohesivebreastfeeding movement, which will acton the various international instruments tocreate an enabling environment formothers, thus contributing to increasingoptimal breastfeeding and infant andyoung child feeding practices.
  9. 9. FUNDING POLICY WABA does not accept funds or gifts from manufacturers or distributors of breast milk substitutes, related equipment such as feeding bottles and teats, commercial foods for breastfeeding mothers, or commercial complementary foods. It also does not accept funds or gifts from manufacturers of other products commonly used in infant feeding such as breast pumps and encourages WABA endorsers to adopt the same ethical stance.
  10. 10. THEMES OF WABA IN VARIOUS YEARS 1992 Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) 1993 Mother-Friendly Workplace Initiative (MFWI) 1994 Protect Breastfeeding: Making the Code Work 1995 Breastfeeding: Empowering Women
  11. 11.  1996 Breastfeeding: A Community Responsibility 1997 Breastfeeding: Natures Way 1998 Breastfeeding: The Best Investment 1999 Breastfeeding: Education for Life
  12. 12.  2000 Breastfeeding: Its Your Right 2001 Breastfeeding in the Information Age 2002 Breastfeeding: Healthy Mothers and Healthy Babies 2003 Breastfeeding in a Globalised World ............for Peace and Justice
  13. 13.  2004 Exclusive Breastfeeding: the Gold Standard - ............Safe, Sound, Sustainable 2005 Breastfeeding and Family Foods: Loving & Healthy - ............Feeding Other Foods While Breastfeeding is Continued 2006 Code Watch - 25 Years of Protecting Breastfeeding 2007 Breastfeeding: The 1st Hour - Save ONE million babies!
  14. 14.  2008 Mother Support: Going for the Gold Everyone Wins! ............ 2009 Breastfeeding: A Vital Emergency Response ............ 2010 Breastfeeding, Just 10 Steps! - ............The baby friendly way 2011 Talk To Me! Breastfeeding - ............A 3D Experience
  15. 15. THEME OF YEAR 2012
  16. 16. CELEBRATING 20 YEARS WBW AND 10 YEARSOF WHO/UNICEFS GLOBAL STRATEGY FORINFANT AND YOUNG CHILD FEEDINGTwenty years ago, the World Alliance forBreastfeeding Action (WABA) launched itsfirst World Breastfeeding Week (WBW)campaign with the theme: "Baby-FriendlyHospital Initiative". The week is set aside toencourage breastfeeding and commemorateUNICEF and WHO’s Innocent Declaration onthe protection, promotion and support ofbreastfeeding worldwide.
  17. 17. The theme of this year’s WorldBreastfeeding Week is‘Understanding the Past, Planningfor the Future,’ a relevantreference to the lessons learnt andthe achievements over the past 20years on infant and young childfeeding (IYCF), and is a call toaction to bridge existing gaps inpolicies and programs supportingbreast- feeding and IYCF.
  18. 18. The World Health Organisation (WHO)and the United Nations Childrens Fund(UNICEF) jointly developed andlaunched the Global Strategy for Infantand Young Child Feeding in 2002,identifying a clear need for optimal infantfeeding practices in reducing malnutritionas well as poverty.
  19. 19. The Global Strategy also calls for thedevelopment of comprehensive nationalpolicies on infant and young child feeding andprovides guidance on how to protect, promoteand support exclusive breastfeeding for first sixmonths with timely introduction of adequate,safe and properly fed complementary foods inaddition to guidance on continuedbreastfeeding for two years or beyond.
  20. 20. OBJECTIVES To recall what has happened in the past 20 years. To celebrate successes and achievements. To assess the status of implementation of the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding. To call for action to bridge the remaining gaps in policy and programmes on breastfeeding /infant and young child feeding (IYCF).
  21. 21. To draw public attention on the state of policy and programmes on breastfeeding and infant and young child feeding.To showcase national work at global level
  22. 22. HISTORY OF ACTION ON BREASTFEEDINGGoing back to the 1970s, when the breastfeedingmovement took centre stage by exposing thedevastating effects of bottle feeding, the internationaldebate led to the World Health Assembly adopting theInternational Code of Marketing of Breast milkSubstitutes (known as The Code) in 1981. In 1990,WHO and UNICEF led efforts to adopt the ‘InnocentDeclaration on Infant and Young Child Feeding’ thatset forth 4 operational targets which were:
  23. 23.  Appoint a national breastfeeding coordinator with appropriate authority. Ensure that every facility providing maternity services fully practises all the ‘Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding’ . Give effect to the principles and aim of The Code and relevant World Health Assembly resolutions. Enact imaginative legislation protecting the breastfeeding rights of working women.
  24. 24. The ‘Ten Steps’ led to the ‘Baby friendlyHospital Initiative’, launched in 1992, andduring the next ten years, many hospitalsworked to become baby friendly, and manyhealth workers were trained on breastfeedingcounselling, to help mothers to breastfeedoptimally both in hospitals and in thecommunity. (Twenty years of progress havebeen documented by UNICEF and updated byCGBI at WABA’s request.
  25. 25. In 2002, to enhance progress, WHO and UNICEF developed and launched the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding, which set out 5 additional targets:• to develop and implement a comprehensive policy on infant and young child feeding• to ensure that health and other relevant sectors protect promote and support exclusive breastfeeding for six months and continued breastfeeding up to two years of age or beyond
  26. 26.  to promote timely adequate safe and appropriate complementary feeding with continued breastfeeding to provide guidance on feeding infants and young children in exceptionally difficult circumstances (malnutrition, low birth-weight, emergencies, and HIV infection) to consider what new legislation may be required to give effect to The Code
  27. 27.  The International Baby Food Action Network, IBFAN, consists of public interest groups working around the world to reduce infant and young child morbidity and mortality. IBFAN aims to improve the health and well-being of babies and young children, their mothers and their families through support of breastfeeding and optimal infant feeding practices.
  28. 28. FOUNDATION OF IBFAN IBFAN is one of the longest-surviving single-issue organisations. IBFAN was founded on October 12th, 1979 after the joint meeting of WHO and UNICEF on Infant and Young Child Feeding
  29. 29. ACTIVITIES OF IBFAN IBFAN is an International Network. Structured like a net, it encompasses the Earth. Groups are diverse: they may work on infant feeding issues alone, or they may be mother support groups, consumer associations, development organisations or citizens rights groups. Some are staffed by volunteers, some have full time staff. What all groups have in common is they take Action to bring about implementation of the International Code and the subsequent, relevant Resolutions of the World Health Assembly.
  30. 30. CONCLUSION AS VARIOUS NGOS PROMOTING THE IMPORTANCE OF BREASTFEEDING , WE NURSES ALSO SHOULD BE INSPIRED BY THIS VISION AND WE EVERYONE HAVE THE RESPONSIBILITY TO PROMOTE OUR BABY’S HEALTH AND OUR OWN. SO WE RIGHTLY CONCLUDED THAT “UNDERSTANDING THE PAST, PLANNING FOR THE FUTURE”

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