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  • 1. Report onTradical ® Hemcrete ® Material Evaluation American Lime Technology The Kubala Washatko Architects, Inc. W61 N617 Mequon Ave, Cedarburg, WI 53012 262.377.6039 | tkwa.com March 17, 2009
  • 2. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y2 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 3. Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t sASTM Testing Evaluation p. 5-35ASTM Testing Evaluation Introduction p. 5Findings Matrix p. 7Construction Types Defined p. 8-9ASTM Tests Defined p. 10-27CombustibilityE 84 Surface Burning p. 10-11E 119 Fire Tests p. 12-13E 136 Vertical Tube Furnace p. 14-15E 736 Cohesion/Adhesion of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members p. 16-17E 759 Effect of Deflection on Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members p. 18-19E 760 Effect of Impact on Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members p. 20-21E 761 Compressive Strength of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members p. 22-23Thermal Per formanceC 1363 Thermal Performance p. 24-25DurabilityC 1262 Freeze-Thaw p. 26-27D 3273 Resistance to Mold Growth p. 28-29E 1886 Missile (Projectile) Tests p. 30-33AcousticE 90 Sound Transmission p. 34-35LEED Evaluation p. 36-45Potential LEED Credit Overview p. 36MRc4 Recycled Content p. 37MRc5 Regional Materials p. 38MRc6 Rapidly Renewable Materials p. 38EQc4.4 Low-Emitting Materials p. 38-39Innovation and Design Credits p. 39-40LEED ® Credit Descriptions p. 41-45 Compiled march 2009 3
  • 4. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y4 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 5. A S T M Te s t i n g E v a l u a t i o n I n t r o d u c t i o nMethodologyThe purpose of this study report is to provide recommendations and guidance to American Lime Technology onwhich ASTM material tests may best fit the projected use and formulation of Tradical Hemcrete.Tradical Hemcrete is a unique product that replaces several other building materials in a wall assembly: gypsumboard, vapor retarder, siding, insulation, sound baffles, etc. As such, research was undertaken as part of this study toascertain the building materials Hemcrete replaces and how those materials are traditionally tested. ModCell Hempwas not evaluated as part of this report.As part of this study the project team:• Reviewed all previous completed testing and product data• Utilized the IBC (International Building Code) to ascertain how code official may view Hemcrete• Met with the client to discuss the future goals for product use• Established the materials Hemcrete replaces in a building wall assembly• Identified similar “traditional” and “innovation” building materials that have previously undertaken similar testing• Identified appropriate ASTM tests• Identified appropriate test agencies• Identified the impact of regional issues (i.e. humidity, seismic, wind, etc...)Fi n d i n g s M a t r i xThe information provided in the Matrix depicts the types of construction and ASTM test. The intent of this matrix is toprovide recommendations on what test likely suite specific types of construction. The use of this matrix should assistin targeting ASTM tests that most suite your goals for Tradical Hemcrete in the United States.Tests denoted as “required” for code compliance on the matrix are essential to receive code approval for product use.Tests denoted in the matrix as “recommended” are not specifically required by code but are strongly encouraged tocollect hard product data and inform code officials. Tests denoted as “not critical” are more driven towards gatheringproduct data for marketing purposes and general information but not essential to any code official requirements.Tests denoted as ”not applicable” do not apply to the type of construction. Please note that “recommended” testsalso speak to issues addressing individual states which may have regionally specific issues such as hurricanes. Theinformation provided in no way speaks to standards in other countries.Ty p e s o f C o n s t r u c t i o nPages 8 and 9 provide information on types of construction including definitions and typical building types. Thisinformation is critical in determining the types of buildings targeted for the Hemcrete market. Use this informationto supplement the decision making process provided in the Matrix for determining which ASTM test are the mostvaluable to your end goal market needs at this time.A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e dThe information provided in the section “ASTM Tests Defined” is meant to provide American Lime Technologieswith a synopsis of information pertinent to determining which tests may be the most appropriate and how theyare implemented. In their complete form, each ASTM section fully defines and instructs testing agencies as to howtesting should actually be carried out. This in depth information is lengthy and not necessary for your purposes. Gapsin numeric sequences are not errors but are omissions of data more pertinent to testing agencies.NOTE: Each test is considered proprietary. Once testing is complete and Hemcrete passes, compliance with the ASTM standardis only achieved through exact duplication of how the material was formulated/installed at the time of testing. Therefore,each sample/mock-up supplied to the labs should be an exact replica of how the product will be installed/specified in thefield. Compiled march 2009 5
  • 6. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y6 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 7. ASTM Test (By Primary Factor of Test) Thermal Combustibility Durability Acoustic Performance Type of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied To Construction Structural Members (required ONLY if used as E 84 * E 119 E 136 structural fireproofing) E 90 Surface Fire-Rated Vertical Tube C1363**** C 1363 D 3273 E 1886 ** Sound E 736 Thermal Freeze-Thaw Mold Missile Burning Assemblies Furnace E 759 E 760 E 761 Transmission Cohensive / Deflection Impact Strength Adhesion IA IB IIA *** IIB *** IIIA IIIB IV VA VB Code Required Notes: * Required by Use and Occupancy rather than Type of Construction Recommended ** May be required by geographic location *** Required if used in exterior wall Not required if used in interior construction Not Critical **** Required if Hemcrete is used as part of insulation system Not ApplicableCompiled march 2009 A S T M Te s t s : F i n d i n g s M a t r i x7
  • 8. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y Type Description Charac teristics Examples IA • Non-combustible construction • Unlimited size and height • Very large/tall commercial • 3 hour fire-rated construction • Highest construction cost buildings • Typical concrete or fireproofed • All uses and occupancies • Governmental and institutional steel frame • Most durable and highest buildings longevity • Hospitals, highrise towers IB • Non-combustible construction •Unlimited size and height • Very large/tall commercial • 2 hour fire-rated construction • Highest construction cost buildings • Typical concrete or fireproofed • All uses and occupancies • Commercial and institutional steel frame • Very durable and highest buildings longevity • Shopping malls, highrise towers IIA • Non-combustible construction • Unlimited size and height • Mid-rise and very large buidings • 1 hour fire-rated construction • High construction cost • Large commercial buildings • Typical fireproofed steel frame • All uses and occupancies • Large office buidings • Very durable and highest • Large retail buidings longevity IIB • Non-combustible construction • Moderate size and height • Small/medium size commercial • Non-rated construction • Moderate to low construction buildings • Typical steel frame cost • Mid-size retail buildings • All uses and occupancies • Mid-size office buildings • Durable and moderate longevity • Large factory buildings • Very common construction IIIA • Non-combustible and 2 hour fire • Moderate size and height • Small/medium size commercial rated exterior bearing wall • Moderate to low construction buildings • Combustible and 1 hour fire-rated cost • Mid-size multifamily residential interior • All uses and occupancies buildings • Durable and moderate longevity • Mid-size office buildings8 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 9. Construc tion Types DefinedType Description Charac teristics Examples • Non-combustible and 2 hour fireIIIB • Moderate size and height • Small/medium size commercial rated Exterior bearing wall • High rise and very large buildings buildings • Typical concrete or fireproofed • All uses and occupancies • Mid-size multifamily residential steel frame 2 hr • Durable and moderate longevity buildings • Interior Walls: Any material permitted per code • Mid-size office buildings • Exterior Walls: Non-combustibleIV construction • Moderate size and height • Moderate cost of construction • Medium size commercial buildings • Mid-size public buildings • Interior Walls: Solid or laminated • All uses and occupancies • Mid-size office buildings wood w/o concealed spaces • Durable and moderate longevity • Heavy timber construction • 1 hour fire-rated combustibleVA • limited size and height • Small/medium size commercial construction • Low cost of construction buildings • Fire-rated combustible interior • All uses and occupancies • Mid-size multifamily residential • Typical wood frame with gypsum • Durable and moderate longevity buildings membrane • Common type of construction • Mid-size office buildingsVB • Non-rated combustible • limited size and height • Small commercial buildings construction • Lowest cost of construction • Small/mid-size multifamily • Non-rated combustible interior • All uses and occupancies residential buildings • Typical wood frame construction • Durable and moderate longevity • Mid-size office buildings • Most common type of construction Compiled march 2009 9
  • 10. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 84 Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials 0.0 Preface This test is the standard to establish the relative behavior of a finish material when exposed to open flame. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This fire-test-response standard for the comparative surface burning behavior of building materials is applicable to exposed surfaces such as walls and ceilings. This test is conducted with the specimen in the ceiling position with the surface to be evaluated exposed face down to the ignition source. The material, product, or assembly shall be capable of being mounted in the test position during the test. Thus, the specimen shall either be self-supporting by its own structural quality, held in place by added supports along the test surface, or secured from the back side. 1.2 The purpose of this test method is to determine the relative burning behavior of the material by observing the flame spread along the specimen. Flame spread and smoke developed index are reported. However, there is not necessarily a relationship between these two measurements. 1.3 The use of supporting materials on the underside of the test specimen has the ability to lower the flame spread index from those which might be obtained if the specimen could be tested without such support. These test results do not necessarily relate to indices obtained by testing materials without such support. 1.4 Testing of materials that melt, drip, or delaminate to such a degree that the continuity of the flame front is destroyed, results in a low flame spread indices (measurement) that do not relate directly to indices by testing materials that remain in place. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 This test method is intended to provide only comparative measurements of surface flame spread and smoke density measurements with that of select grade red oak and reinforced cement board surfaces under the specific fire exposure conditions described herein. 4.2 This test method exposes a nominal 24 ft (7.32-m) long by 20 in. (508 mm) wide specimen to a controlled air flow and flaming fire exposure adjusted to spread the flame along the entire length of the select grade red oak specimen in 5 1/2 min. 4.3 This test method does not provide the following: 4.3.1 Measurement of heat transmission through the tested surface. 4.3.2 The effect of aggravated flame spread behavior of an assembly resulting from the proximity of combustible walls and ceilings. 4.3.3 Classifying or defining a material as noncombustible, by means of a flame spread index by itself. 6.0 Test Specimens 6.2 The specimen shall be provided in one of two ways: (1) a continuous, unbroken length; (2) sections that will be joined or butted end-to-end. 6.3 The size of the test specimen shall be: Width: between 20 and 24 in. (508 and 610mm) Length: 24 ft. + 12 in. - 6 in. Thickness: maximum 4 in. (101 mm)10 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 11. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y11.0 Report11.1.4 Observations of the burning characteristics of the specimen during test exposure, such as delamination, sagging, shrinkage, fallout, etc.11.1.5 Graphical plots of flame spread and smoke development data.Testing LaboratoryPFS Corporation hardwood Plywood & Veneer Association1507 Matt Pass 1825 Michael Faraday Dr.Cottage Grove, WI 53527 Reston, VA 20190Tel: 608-839-1013 Tel: 703-435-2900Fax: 608-839-1082 Fax: 703-435-2537Michael J. Slifka, P.E. Thomas A. Wilsonmslifka@pfscorporation.com testlab@hpva.orghttp://www.pfscorporation.com http://www.hpvalab.orgCommercial Testing Company Southwest Research InstitutePO Box 985 Department of Fire Technology1215 S. Hamilton St. PO Drawer 28510Dalton, GA 30720 San Antonio, TX 78228-0510Tel: 706-278-3935 Tel: 210-522-2311Fax: 706-278-3936 Fax: 210-522-3377Jonathan Jackson Marc Janssensjjackson@commercialtesting.com fire-info@swri.orghttp://www.commercialtesting.com http://www.fire.swri.orgGuardian Fire Testing Laboratories474 Hinman Ave.Buffalo, NY 14216Tel: 716-877-2760Fax: 716-835-5682R. Joseph Pearsongftli@earthlink.nethttp://www.firetesting.comAssociated Costs$175 set-up charge and $875 per test. Three replicates tested for $2,800.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 11
  • 12. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 119 Fire Tests of Building Construction and Materials 0.0 Preface This test is the standard to establish the fire resistance of a building assembly (a system of components or materials). 1.0 Scope 1.1 The test methods described in this fire-test-response standard are applicable to assemblies of masonry units and to composite assemblies of structural materials for buildings, including bearing and other walls and partitions, columns, girders, beams, slabs, and composite slab and beam assemblies for floors and roofs. They are also applicable to other assemblies and structural units that constitute permanent integral parts of a finished building. 1.3 This standard is used to measure and describe the response of materials, products, or assemblies to heat and flame under controlled conditions, but does not by itself incorporate all factors required for fire hazard or fire risk assessment of the materials, products or assemblies under actual fire conditions. 1.4 These test methods prescribe a standard fire exposure for comparing the test results of building construction assemblies. The results of these tests are but one factor in assessing predicted fire performance of building construction and assemblies. Application of these test results to predict the performance of actual building construction requires the evaluation of test conditions. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 This test method is intended to evaluate the duration for which the types of assemblies notes in 1.1 contain fire, retain their structural integrity, or exhibit both properties dependent upon the type of assembly involved during a predetermined test exposure. 4.2 The test exposes a specimen to a standard fire controlled to achieve specified temperatures throughout a specified time period. When required, the fire exposure is followed by the application of a specified standard fire hose stream. The test provides a relative measure of the fire-test-response of comparable assemblies under these fire exposure conditions. The exposure is not representative of all fire conditions because conditions vary with changes in the amount, nature and distribution of fire loading, ventilation, compartment size and configuration, and heat sink characteristics of the compartment. Variation from the test conditions or specimen construction, such as size, materials, method of assembly, also affects the fire- test response. For these reasons, evaluation of the variation is required for application to construction in the field. 4.3 This test standards provides for the following: 4.3.1 For walls, partitions, and floor or roof assemblies: 4.3.1.1 Measurement of the transmission of heat. 4.3.1.2 Measurement of the transmission of hot gases through the assembly, sufficient to ignite cotton waste. 4.3.1.3 For load bearing elements, measurement of the load carrying ability of the test specimen during the test exposure. 9.0 Test Specimen 9.1 The test specimen shall be truly representative of the construction for which classification is desired, as to materials, workmanship, and details such as dimensions of parts, and shall be built under conditions12 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 13. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y representative of those obtaining as practically applied in building construction and operation. The physical properties of the materials and ingredients used in the test specimen shall be determined and recorded.9.2 The size and dimensions of the test specimen specified herein shall apply for rating constructions of dimensions within the range employed in buildings. When the conditions of use limit the construction to smaller dimensions, the dimensions of the specimen shall be reduced proportionately for a test qualifying them for such restricted use.TEST OF BEARING WALLS AND PARTITIONS14.0 Size of Specimen14.1 The area exposed to fire shall be not less than 100 ft2 (9m2), with neither dimension less than 9 ft. (2.7 m). The test specimen shall not be restrained on its vertical edges.TEST OF NONBEARING WALLS AND PARTITIONS17.0 Size of Specimen17.1 The area exposed to fire shall be not less than 100 ft2 (9m2), with neither dimension less than 9 ft. (2.7 m). Restrain the test specimen on all four edges.Testing LaboratoryPFS Corporation OThER:1507 Matt Pass underwriters Laboratory, Inc.Cottage Grove, WI 53527 (Not specifically recommended by ASTM)Tel: 608-839-1013 333 Pfingsten RoadFax: 608-839-1082 Northbrook, IL 60062-2096Michael J. Slifka, P.E. Tel: 847-272-8800mslifka@pfscorporation.com No contact name could be obtained.http://www.pfscorporation.com www.ul.com web link to request product evaluation:Commercial Testing Company http://my.home1.ul.com/portal/page/PO Box 985 portal/RFQ/INDUSTRY)1215 S. Hamilton St. Note: UL’s run of the E 119 test resultsDalton, GA 30720 in a UL label rating of UL263, this couldTel: 706-278-3935 prove to be important to code officials andFax: 706-278-3936 specifiers.)Jonathan Jacksonjjackson@commercialtesting.comhttp://www.commercialtesting.comAssociated CostsConstruction of a sample(s) wall/floor/ceiling assembly is required for this test. The cost for this test varies basedupon the following factors. Walls: The assembly, desired duration, whether it requires a separate wall to conduct thehose stream, instrumentation, etc.- $15,000 to $20,000. Floor/Roof: The assembly, desired duration, load, requiredmaterials, instrumentation, etc.- $20,000.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 13
  • 14. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 136 Behavior of Materials in a Vertical Tube Furnace 0.0 Preface This test is the standard to establish if a material is combustible or non-combustible. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This fire-test-response test method covers the determination under specified laboratory conditions of combustion characteristics of building materials. It is not intended to apply to laminated or coated surfaces. 1.4 This standard is used to measure and describe the response of materials, products, or assemblies to heat and flame under controlled conditions, but does not by itself incorporate all factors required for fire hazard or fire risk assessment of the materials, products or assemblies under actual fire conditions. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 While actual building fire exposure conditions are not duplicated, this test method will assist in indicating those materials which do not act to aid combustion or add appreciable heat to an ambient fire. 4.2 Materials passing the test are permitted limited flaming and other indications of combustion. 6.0 Test Specimen 6.1 All test specimens shall be 38 by 38 by 51 + 2.5 mm (1.5 by 1.5 by 2.0 + 0.1 in.). The specimens shall be dried at 60 + 3oC (140 + 5oF) for not less than 24 hour but no more than 48 hours. Specimens shall not be placed in a desiccator to cool at least 1 hour before testing. 6.2 Not less than four identical specimens shall be tested. 8.0 Report 8.1 Report the material as passing the test if at least three of the four specimens tested meet the individual specimen criteria detailed in 8.2 or 8.3. The three specimens do not need to meet the same condition. 8.2 When the weight loss of the specimens is 50% or less: 8.2.1 The recorded temperatures of the surface and interior thermocouples do not at any time during the test rise more than 30oC (54oF) above the stabilized temperature measured at T2 prior to the test. 8.2.2 There is no flaming from the specimen after the first 30 seconds. 8.3 When the weight loss of the specimen exceeds 50%: 8.3.1 The recorded temperature of the surface and interior thermocouples do not at any time during the test rise above the stabilized temperature measured at T2 prior to the test. 8.3.2 There is no flaming from the specimen at any time during the test.14 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 15. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T YTesting LaboratoryArchitectural Testing, Inc. Commercial Testing Company130 Derry Court PO Box 985York, PA 17406-8405 1215 S. Hamilton St.Tel: 717-764-7700 Dalton, GA 30720Fax: 717-764-4129 Tel: 706-278-3935Daniel J. Wise Fax: 706-278-3936dwise@archtest.com Jonathan Jacksonhttp://www.archtest.com jjackson@commercialtesting.com http://www.commercialtesting.comSGS Consumer Testing Services291 Fairfield Ave.Fairfield, NJ 07004Tel: 973-575-5252Tel: 800-777-8378Fax: 973-575-7175Dominick Leporedominick.lepore@sgs.comhttp://www.us.sgs.com/NGC Testing Services1650 Military Rd.Buffalo, NY 14217Tel: 716-873-9750x341Fax: 716-873-9753Bob Menchettiemail@ngctestingservices.comhttp://www.ngctestingservices.comAssociated Costs$250 set up fee and $1,250 per test series of four cubes. $5,250 per each evaluated material plus the supply ofsamples.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 15
  • 16. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 736 Cohesion/Adhesion of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members 0.0 Preface This test establishes how well an applied fire-resistive material adheres to structural steel. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measuring the cohesion/adhesion or bond strength (tensile) perpendicular to the surface of sprayed fire-resistive material (SFRM) applied to rigid backing. These fire- resistive materials include sprayed fibrous and cementitious materials. The test method is applicable to both laboratory and field procedures as indicated in Section 7. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 The intent of this test method is to determine a property of SFRM that may be used to provide an indication of its in-place serviceability. Satisfactory performance of SFRM applied to structural members and assemblies depends upon its ability to withstand the various influences that may occur during construction and during the life of the structure, as well as upon its satisfactory performance under fire conditions. 7.0 Test Specimen Note: The specimen can either be laboratory or field tested. 7.1 Laboratory Tests: 7.1.1 The SFRM shall be applied at a thickness of 12 mm to 25 mm (1/2 in. to 1 in.) to the 300 by 300 mm (12 by 12 in.) galvanized steel sheet. 7.1.2 Condition the specimen at room temperature (20+ 10oC (68 + 18oF)). After 72 h, samples may be forced dried in a drying oven at 43 + 6oC (110 + 10oF), and a relative humidity not greater than 60% until successive weight readings, taken at 8 h intervals, differ by less than 1 percent. 7.1.3 Testing may be performed after it has been determined that all samples have reached constant weight as defined in 7.1.2. 7.2 Field Tests: 7.2.1 The test specimen shall be the in-place SFRM as applied to any field condition surface. Where a 300 mm (12 by 12 in.) area is not available, such as on beams and fluted deck, use the width of the beam or the width of a flute by 300 mm (12 in.) length. The area shall be at least 100 by 300 mm (4 by 12 in.). See 5.2 for exceptions. 7.2.2 Condition the specimen at atmospheric conditions or in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations for a period sufficient to be considered dry. 7.2.3 Mechanical ventilation may be employed on the manufacturers’ recommendation to expedite drying. 8.0 Procedure 8.1 Apply adhesive sufficient to fill the metal or plastic cap, and immediately place the cap against the surface of the SFRM. 8.2 Support the cap at the surface until the adhesive has adequately cured. Wipe away any excess adhesive around the cap before it cures, or carefully cut it away after it cures. 8.3 Laboratory Tests:16 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 17. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y8.3.1 Restrain the specimen with the SFRM facing up to prevent movement and flexing during testing.8.3.2 Engage the scale with the hook and exert an increasing force at a minimum uniform or incremental rate of approximately 5 kg (11 lb)/min perpendicular to the surface.8.3.3 Force shall be applied until failure occurs, a predetermined value is reached, or until the capacity of the scale is reached.8.4 Field Tests:8.4.1 Perform tests as described in 8.3.2-8.3.4.8.4.2 A nondestructive field test may be performed by replacing the scale with a fixed weight that must be supported for 1 min.10.0 Report10.1 Report the following information:10.1.1 Force, newtons (pounds force),10.1.2 Cohesion/adhesive force (bond strength), pascals (pounds per10.1.3 Description of the type of failure.10.1.4 Approximate area of material involved in the failure, if it extends beyond the perimeter of the cap.10.1.5 Thickness of the SFRM.10.1.6 Density of the SFRM.Testing LaboratoryPenniman & Browne, Inc.6252 Falls Rd. Applied Testing & Geosciences, LLCBaltimore, MD 21209-0509 401 E. Fourth StreetTel: 410-825-4131 Building 12BFax: 410-321-7384 Bridgeport, PA 19405Rebecca Penniman Tel: 610-313-3227pres@pandbinc.com Fax: 610-313-9667http://www.pandbinc.com Craig Joss info@appliedtesting.com http://www.appliedtesting.com/Associated CostsTesting costs range from $250 to $500.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 17
  • 18. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 759 Effect of Deflection on Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members 0.0 Preface This test establishes how well an applied fire-resistive material bonds to steel decks while under bending stress. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effect of deflection on sprayed fire-resistive material (SFRM) applied to steel deck. Thee materials include sprayed fibrous and cementitious materials applied directly in contact with the structural members. The test method is applicable only to laboratory procedures. 3.0 Summary of Test Method 3.1 In this test method a cellular steel deck panel sprayed with fire-resistive material is subjected to bending by a vertical center load while supported horizontally at its ends. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 The intent of this test method is to determine properties of direct-applied SFRM that may be used to provide an indication of serviceability. Satisfactory performance of fire-resistive material applied to structural members and assemblies depends upon its ability while in place to withstand the various influences that may occur during the life of the structure, as well as upon its satisfactory performance under fire tests. 4.2 This test method measures the behavior of SFRM when subjected to deflection and evaluates such phenomena as spalling and delamination under bending stress. It is an indication of the ability of SFRM to remain in place and resist removal during anticipates service conditions. 7.0 Test Specimen 7.1 Apply the SFRM to the underside of the steel deck at a minimum 19 mm (3/4 in.) thickness. Do not apply the SFRM to the area 330 mm (13 in.) from each end of the specimen, in order to permit the steel deck to bear directly on the supports. 7.2 Condition the prepared specimen for a period of not less than one week at ambient temperatures and humidity conditions (but not less than 4.4oC (40oF)) until cured. 7.3 Condition the specimen for a period sufficient to be considered dry in accordance with the manufacturers’ recommendations. 8.0 Procedure 8.1 Place the specimen on the test supports with the SFRM as the lower surface. 8.2 To measure the deflection of the specimen, record the initial reading of the dial micrometer prior to the application of the load and record the deformation of the load applied. 8.3 Apply a vertical center load to the upper face of the specimen by means of a bearing block to develop a deflection of 1/120 of the clear span, that is, 25 mm (1.0 in.).18 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 19. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y9.0 Report9.1 Report the following information:9.1.1 Condition of the test specimen when it has deflected the required 1/120 the clear span,9.1.2 Any spalling or delamination, and9.1.3 Thickness of the SFRM in millimeters (or inches) and the density in kilograms per cubic metre (or pounds per cubic foot).Testing LaboratoryNone suggested by ASTM.Associated CostsNote: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 19
  • 20. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 760 Effect of Impact on Bonding of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members 0.0 Preface This test establishes how well an applied fire-resistive material bonds to steel decks while under bending stress. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers a procedure for determining the effect of impact loading on the bonding of sprayed fire-resistive material (SFRM) applied to the underside of steel floor deck. These materials include sprayed fibrous and cementitious materials applied directly in contact with the structural members. The test method is applicable only to laboratory procedures. 3.0 Summary of Test Method 3.1 In this test method, a cellular steel deck with a concrete topping sprayed with fire-resistive material is subjected to a leather bag drop impact while supported horizontally at its ends. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 The intent of this test method is to determine a property of SFRM that may be used to provide an indication of its in-place serviceability. Satisfactory performance of SFRM applied to structural members and assemblies depends upon its ability to withstand the various influences that may occur during construction and during the life of the structure, as well as upon its satisfactory performance under fire conditions. 4.2 The test method measures the behavior of SFRM when the floor construction to which it is applied is subjected to shock loading and evaluates adhesion and resistance to spalling, cracking, and delamination. It is an indication of the ability of SFRM to remain in place and resist removal during anticipates service conditions. 6.0 Materials 6.1 The test specimen shall be a deck assembly consisting of cellular steel deck and a concrete topping. The cellular steel deck shall be of the noncomposite type, nominal 40 mm (1 1/2 in.) deep, 600 mm (24 in.) wide, by 3600 mm (12 ft) long, consisting of a 1.5 mm (0.060 in.) thick galvanized or painted steel fluted top section and 1.2 mm (0.048 in.) galvanized steel flat bottom section welded together to form four cells 150 mm (6 in.) on center. 6.2 The concrete shall be nominal 20 MPa (3000psi), and 64mm (2 1/2 in.) deep as measured from the top plane to the steel decking. 6.3 This test method requires the application of SFRM in accordance with manufacturers’ published instructions. The apparatus, materials, and procedures used to apply the SFRM for this test shall be representative of application in the field. 6.4 The density of the prepared sample shall be similar to the density tested and reported during the Test Methods E 119 and Test Method E 84 fire exposure tests or as required by the sponsor of the test.20 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 21. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y7.0 Test Specimen7.1 Laboratory Tests:7.1.1 Apply the SFRM to the underside of the steel deck no sooner than seven days after the concrete has been placed. Do not apply the SFRM to the area 330 mm (13in.) in from each end of the specimen, in order to permit the steel deck to bear directly on the supports.7.1.2 Condition the prepared specimen for a period of not less than one week at ambient temperature and humidity conditions (not less than 4.4oC (40oF)).7.1.3 Condition the specimen for a period sufficient to be considered dry in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendation.8.0 Procedure8.1 Place the specimen on the test supports with the SFRM as the lower surface and the concrete as the upper surface.8.2 Hoist the bag to a height of 1.2 m (4 ft.) as measured from the upper face of the specimen to the bottom of the bag.8.3 Apply an impact load once to the middle of the upper face of the specimen by dropping the leather bag.9.0 Report9.1 Report the following information:9.1.1 A complete description of the overall specimen, including the final physical condition and appearance of the SFRM after impact.9.1.2 Any spalling, delamination, cracking, and9.1.3 Thickness in millimeters (or inches) and the density of the SFRM in kilograms per cubic metre (or pounds per cubic foot).Testing LaboratoryNone suggested by ASTM.Associated CostsNote: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 21
  • 22. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 761 Compressive Strength of Sprayed Fire-Resistive Materials Applied to Structural Members 0.0 Preface This test establishes the compressive strength of an applied fire-resistive material after being applied to structural steel. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers a procedure for measuring the compressive strength of sprayed fire-resistive material (SFRM) applied to a rigid substrate. These fire-resistive materials include sprayed fibrous and cementitious materials applied directly in contact with the structural members. The test method is applicable only to laboratory procedures. 3.0 Summary of Test Method 3.1 The compressive strength of SFRM applied to steel sheet is determined by applying a crushing load normal to the surface of the specimen. This test method measures the stress at 10% deformation or at failure, whichever is smaller. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 The intent of this test method is to determine properties of direct-applied SFRM that may be used to provide an indication of its serviceability. Satisfactory performance of fire-resistive material applied to structural members and assemblies depends upon its ability to withstand the various influences that may occur during the life of the structure, as well as upon its satisfactory performance under fire tests. 4.2 The test method measures the compressive strength of SFRM and is a measure of the resistance to deformation under a compressive load. It is an indication of the ability of SFRM to remain in place and resist removal during anticipated service conditions. 6.0 Materials 6.1 This test method requires the application of SFRM in accordance with manufacturer’s published instructions. The apparatus, materials, and procedures used to apply the SFRM fro this test shall be representative of application in the field. 6.2 The density of the prepared sample shall be similar to the density tested and reported during the Test Methods E 119 and Test Method E 84 fire exposure tests or as required by the sponsor of the test. 6.3 Determine the density and thickness of each of the laboratory-prepared specimens. Report in accordance with Test Methods E 605. 7.0 Test Specimen 7.1 The test specimen shall be SFRM applied to galvanized sheet metal,1.5 mm (0.060 in (16 ga.)) minimum thickness, 175 by 600 mm (7 by 24 in.). Clean with solvent to remove any oil on the surface to be sprayed,in accordance with Practice 2092. 7.2 Apply the fire resistive material to the galvanized steel sheet at a minimum thickness of 19 mm (3/4 in.). Individual thickness measurement shall be + 3.0 mm (0.125 in.) with no measurment less than 19 mm (3/422 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 23. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : C O M B U S T I B I L I T Y in.).7.3 Condition the prepared specimen for a period of not less than 72 h at room temperature (20+ 10oC (68 + 18oF)) and at a relative humidity not greater than 60%. After 72 h, the specimen may be forced dried in a dying oven at 43 + 6oC (110 + 10oF), and at a relative humidity not greater than 60% until reachig constant weight.7.4 Testing may be performed after it has been determined that the specimen has reached constant weight.7.5 Where necessary, even the surface of the specimen at two areas 150 mm (6 in.) square at opposite ends of the specimen with an appropriate capping material such as polyurethane, epoxy, polyester, or other similar materials. The top plane of the capping material shall not exceed the thickest point of the test area of a test specimen with an irregular surface by more than 1.3 mm (0.05 in.).7.6 Make two compression tests at opposite ends of the test specimen. Make one density test on the specimen.7.7 Other types of noncompressible backing may be used if specified.8.0 Procedure8.1 Apply the load perpendicular to the face of the test specimen, with the bearing block on top of the specimen. The initial thickness of the test specimen for deformation calculations shall be the distance between the plane bearing surface of the block assembly and the steel (backing) plane, after an initial load of 0.7 kPa (0.1 psi) has been applied to the specimen.8.2 The speed of the moving head of the testing machine shall not be more than 1.3 mm (0.05 in.)/min. Compress the specimen until either a deformation of 10% or ultimate load is reached, whichever occurs first.9.0 Report9.1 Report the following information:9.1.1 Compressive strength in kilopascals (or pounds-force per square inch), including weight of spherical test block assembly at 10% deformation or at ultimate load, whichever is smaller,9.1.2 Mode of failure, and9.1.3 Thickness in millimeters (or inches) and the density in kilograms per cubic metre (or pounds per cubic foot) of the SFRM.Testing LaboratoryNone suggested by ASTM.Associated CostsNote: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 23
  • 24. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: C 1363 Thermal Performance 0.0 Preface This test establishes the insulative value of a material more commonly known as “R-value”. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers the laboratory measurement of heat transfer through a specimen under controlled air temperature, air velocity, and thermal radiation conditions established in a metering chamber on one side and in a climate chamber on the other side. 1.2 This test method generally is used for large homogeneous or nonhomogeneous specimens. This test method may be used for any building structure or composite assemblies of building elements for which it is possible to build a representative specimen of a size that is appropriate for the testing apparatus. 1.3 This test method is intended for use at conditions typical of normal building applications. The usual consideration is to duplicate naturally occurring outside conditions that in temperate zones may range from approximately -48 to 85oC and normal inside residential temperatures of approximately 21oC. Building materials used to construct the specimens are generally pre-conditioned to typical laboratory conditions of 23oC and 50% relative humidity prior to assembly. 1.4 The test method permits operation under natural or forced convective conditions at the specimen surface. The direction of air flow motion may be either perpendicular or parallel to the surface. 1.8 This test method does not permit intentional mass transfer of air or moisture through the specimen during measurements of energy transfer. Air infiltration or moisture migration can significantly alter net heat transfer. 5.0 Significance and use 5.1 There is a need for accurate data on heat transfer through insulations and through insulated structures. The data are needed to judge compliance with specifications and regulations as well as design guidance, for research evaluations of the effects of changes in materials or construction, and verification of, or use in, simulation models/energy models. 5.2 For the results to be representative of a building construction, only representative full-scale sections should be tested. The specimens should be duplicate framing geometry, material composition and installation practice, and orientation of construction. 7.0 Test Specimens 7.1 The test specimens shall be representative of typical product (field) applications. 7.1.1 Size - The specimen shall be sized for the apparatus. Normally, the outside dimensions of the specimen must match the inside dimensions of the specimen frame. If smaller elements must be tested, a surround panel may be used to fill out the required size. 11.0 Calculation 11.2 Average Temperature Determination: 11.2.1 When operated under steady-state conditions with temperatures held constant during a test, the results maybe expressed as either thermal resistance, R, thermal conductance, C, overall thermal resistance Ru, or thermal transmittance, U. This allows two procedures which are to be used in determining the average24 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 25. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : T H E R M A L P E R F O R M A N C E surface temperatures used in the calculations. The choice between the two procedures depends upon the uniformity of the specimen and thus upon whether sufficiently uniform surface temperature exist that they can be measured by temperature sensors and a representative average obtained.The two procedures are :11.2.1.1 For uniform and nearly uniform specimens, the average surface temperatures may be determined from area weighted measurements from the temperature sensors installed as directed in 6.10. The thermal resistance, R, is then calculated using the measured heat transfer and the difference in the average temperatures of the two surfaces.11.2.2 For very nonuniform specimens, meaningful average surface temperatures will not exist. In this case the thermal resistance, R, is calculated by subtracting surface resistance fro the two surfaces from the measured overall thermal resistance, Ru. These surface resistances shall be determined from tests conducted under similar conditions, but using a uniform test specimen of approximately the same overall thermal resistance.12.0 Report12.1.10 Net heat transfer through the specimens, steady-state average rate or the average amount per cycle or other stated time interval for dynamic tests. Include values for metering box loss, flanking loss, and other losses included in the net energy calculation.12.1.11 Any thermal transmission properties calculated in 11.3 (“Calculation of Thermal Properties”), and their estimated error.Testing LaboratoryNational Certified Testing Labs5 Leigh DriveYork, PA 17406Tel: 717-846-1200Fax: 717-767-4100Daniel Zeidersdzeiders@nctlinc.comhttp://www.nctlinc.comArchitectural Testing, Inc.849 Western Ave. NorthSt. Paul, MN 55117-5245Tel: 651-636-3835Fax: 651-636-3843Dan Johnsondjohnson@archtest.comhttp://www.archtest.comAssociated Costs$1,500 per test sample (4’ x 4’ or 6’ x 6’ sample), includes report.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 25
  • 26. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: C 1262 Evaluating the Freeze-Thaw Durability of Dry-Cast Segmental Retaining Wall units and Related Concrete units 0.0 Preface This test establishes the behavior of a material to freeze/thaw cycles. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers the resistance to freezing and thawing of dry-cast segmental retaining wall (SRW) units (see Specification C 1372) and related concrete units. Units are tested in a test solution that is either water or 3% saline solution depending on the intended use of the units in actual service. (Note 1: Related concrete units include units such as hollow and solid concrete masonry units, concrete brick, and concrete roof pavers.) 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 4.0 Significance and use 4.1 The procedure described in this test method is intended to determine the effects of freezing and thawing on SRW and related units in the presence of water or saline solution. 4.2 This procedure is not intended to provide a quantitative measure to determine an expected length of service for a specific type of concrete unit. 6.0 Sampling 6.1 Selection of Test Specimens - Select while units representative of the lot from which they have been selected. The units shall be free from visible cracks or structural defects. 6.2 Number of Specimens - Select five SRW units for freeze-thaw tests. 9.0 Calculation and Report 9.1 Determine and report the cumulative weight loss of each residue collection interval expressed in terms of g (lb) and as a percent of the calcualted initial weight of the specimen determined in accrodance with 8.3.5. Where the coupon thickness is less than 1.25 in. (32mm), the percentage and cumulative weight loss shall be multiplied by a value equal to the actual thickness in inches (mm) divided by 1.25 in. (32mm). Report these values for each specimen as well as the average of the specimens tested. (8.3.5 - At the completion of the freezing-and thawing testing, dry each specimen at 212 to 239 oF (100 to 155oC) for 24+ 1h. Weigh to the nearest 1 g (0.002lb) the final oven-dried specimen and record the final weight.26 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 27. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : D U R A B I L I T YTesting LaboratoryNelson Testing Laboratories1210 Remington Rd.Schaumburg, IL 60173-4812Tel: 847-882-1146Fax: 847-882-1148Mark Nelsonmnelson@nelsontesting.comhttp://www.nelsontesting.comBraun Intertec11001 Hampshire Ave SMinneaplois, MN 55438Tel: 952-995-2000Fax: 952-995-2020Thor Stangebyeinfo@braunintertec.comhttp://braunintertec.comAssociated Costs$850 per test. (100 cycles are required with five cycles completed per week. Test takes twenty weeks to complete.)Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 27
  • 28. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: D 3273 Resistance to Growth of Mold on the Surface of Interior Coatings in an Environmental Chamber 0.0 Preface This test measures the resistance to mold growth on or within the material. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method describes a small environmental chamber and the conditions of operation to evaluate reproducibility in a 4 week period the relative resistance of paint films to surface mold fungi, mildew growth in a severe interior environment. 1.2 This test method can be used to evaluate the comparative resistance of interior coating to accelerated mildew growth. Performance at a certain rating does not imply and specific period of time for a fungal free coating. However, a better rated coating nearly always performs better in actual end use. 3.0 Significance and use 3.1 An accelerated test for determining the resistance of interior coatings to mold growth is useful in estimating the performance of coatings designed for use in interior environments that promote mold growth and in evaluating compounds that may inhibit such growth and the aggregate levels for their use. 5.0 Reagents and Materials 5.3.2 Gypsum Board Panels, 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) thick, 75 by 100 mm (3 by 4 in.). Note: These panels (after an initial mold growth stage) are coated with the surface coating to be tested i.e. lime wash. 8.0 Report 8.1 Report the results at the end of the 4 week exposure giving the mean and range of the three panels. The result from any panel that differs by more than 2 rating units from either of the others can be considered manifestly faulty and discarded and the mean of the remaining two panels reported. If all panels in a set differ by more than 2 units in their ratings, discard all results and repeat the test. Testing Laboratory Environ Laboratories LLC 9725 Girard Avenue, South Minneapolis, MN 55431 Tel: 952-888-7795 Tel: 800-826-3710 Fax: 952-888-6345 Marcia Mc Callum mtm@environlab.com http://www.environlab.com28 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 29. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : D U R A B I L I T YThe MicroStar Lab., Ltd.72 East StreetCrystal Lake, IL 60014Tel: 815-526-0954Fax: 815-356-7342Judy Lazonbyjudy@microstarlab.comhttp://www.microstarlab.comBiosan Laboratories, Inc.1950 Tobsal Ct.Warren, MI 48091Tel: 586-755-8970Tel: 800-253-6800Fax: 586-755-8978Lesley Thomaslesley@biosan.comhttp://www.biosan.comAssociated Costs$2,500 per test plus the supply of materials. Test cost includes one sample box. Each sample box holds 30 samples.Each test run requires 3 replicant samples, therefore the test cost includes 10 total samples.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 29
  • 30. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 1886 Performance of Exterior Windows, Curtain Walls, Doors, and Storm Shutters Impacted by Missles(s) and Exposed to Cyclic Pressure Differentials TKWA Note: Given that this test is typically structured around the wind speed maps for a particular region, we suggest selecting a region that typifies hurricane level event wind loads for maximum results. 0.0 Preface This test establishes the materials resistance to flying debis. The test is primarily used to evaluate windows. however, testing hemcrete would establish the strength and durability to aborant weather conditions. It is not out of the ordinary to test building materials in this manner. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method determines the performance of exterior windows, curtain walls, doors, and storm shutters impacted by missile(s) and subsequently subjected to cyclic static pressure differentials. A missile propulsion device, an air pressure system, and a test chamber are used to model some conditions which may be representative of windborne debris and pressures in a windstorm environment. This test method is applicable to the design of entire fenestration or shutter assemblies and their installation. The performance determined by this test method relates to the ability of elements of the building envelope to remain unbreached during a windstorm (i.e. hurricane or tornado). 4.0 Summary of Test Method 4.1 This test method consists of mounting the test specimen, impacting the test specimen with a missile(s), and then applying cyclic static pressure differentials across the test specimen in accordance with a specified test loading program, observing and measuring the condition of the test specimen, and reporting the results. 5.0 Significance and use 5.1 Structural design of exterior windows, curtains walls, doors, and storm shutters is typically based on positive and negative design pressure(s). Design pressures based on wind speeds with a mean recurrence interval (usually 25-100 years) that relates to desired levels of structural reliability and are appropriate for the type and importance of the building. The adequacy of the structural design is substantiated by other Test Methods such as E 330 and E 1233 which discuss proof loads as added factors of safety. However, these test methods do not account for other factors such as impact from windborne debris followed by fluctuating pressures associated with a severe windstorm environment. As demonstrated by windstorm damage investigations, windborne debris is present in hurricanes and has caused significant amount of damage to building envelopes. The actual in-service performance of fenestration assemblies and storm shutters in areas prone to severe windstorms is dependent on many factors. Windstorm damage investigations have shown that the effects of windborne debris, followed by the effects of repeated or cyclic wind loading, were a major factor in building damage.30 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 31. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : D U R A B I L I T Y5.1.1 Many factors affect the actual loading on building surfaces during a severe windstorm, including varying wind direction, duration of the wind event, height above ground, building shape, terrain, surrounding structures, and other factors. The resistance of fenestration or shutter assemblies to wind loading after impact depends upon the product design, installation, load magnitude, duration, and repetition.5.1.2 Windows, doors, and curtain walls are building envelope components often subject to damage in windstorms. The damage caused by windborne debris during windstorms goes beyond failure of building envelope components such as windows, doors, and curtain walls. Breaching of the envelope exposes a building’s content to the damaging effects of continued wind and rain. A potentially more serious result is internal pressurization. When the windward wall of a building is breached, the internal pressure in the building increases, resulting in increased outward acting pressure on the other walls and roof. The intyernal pressure coefficient (see ANSI/ASCE 7), which is one of several design parameters, can increase by a factor as high as four. This can increase the net outward acting pressure by a factor as high as two.5.2 In this test method, a test specimen is first subjected to specified missile impact(s) followed by the application of a specified number of cycles of positive and negative static pressure differential. The assembly must satisfy the pass/fail criteria established by the specifying authority, which may allow damage such as deformation, deflection, or glass breakage.5.3 The windborne debris generated during a severe windstorm varies greatly, depending upon windspeed, height above the ground, terrain, surrounding structures, and other sources of debris. Typical debris in hurricanes consists of missiles including, but not limited to, roof gravel, roof tiles, signage, portions of damaged structures, framing lumber, roofing materials, and sheet metal... The missiles and their associated velocity ranges used in this test method are selected to reasonably represent typical debris produced by windstorms.5.4 To determine design wind loads, average wind speeds are translated into air pressure differences. Superimposed on the average winds are gusts whose aggregation, for short periods of time (ranging from fractions of seconds to a few seconds) may move at considerably higher speeds than the averaged winds. Wind pressures related to building design, wind intensity versus duration, frequency of occurrence, and other factors are considered.5.4.1 Wind speeds are typically selected for particular geographic locations and probabilities of occurrence from wind speed maps such as those prepared by the National Weather Service, from appropriate wind load documents such as ANSI/ANCE 7 or from building codes enforced in a particular geographic region.5.4.2 Equivalent static pressure differences are calculated using the selected wind speeds.5.5 Cyclic pressure effects on fenestration assemblies after impact by windborne debris are significant. It is appropriate to test the strength of the assembly for a time duration representative of sustained winds and gusts in a windstorm. Gust wind loads are of relatively short duration. Other test methods such as E 330 and E 1233, do not model gust loadings. They are not to be specified for the purpose of testing the adequacy of the assembly to remain unbreached in a windstorm environment following impact by windborne debris. Compiled march 2009 31
  • 32. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y 8.0 Test Specimen 8.1 The test specimen shall consist of the entire fenestration or shutter assembly and contain all devices used to resist wind and windborne debris. Test specimens for large fenestrations and curtain wall assemblies shall be one panel unless otherwise specified. 8.2 All parts of the test specimen shall be full size, as specified for actual use, using the identical materials, details, and methods of construction. 12.0 Report 12.1.7 Results for each test specimen. 12.1.8 Impact test, 12.1.8.1The location of impact(s) on each test specimen, 12.1.8.2The exact description of the missile including dimensions and mass, 12.1.8.3The missile speed and orientation at impact, and 12.1.8.4The conditioning temperature of the specimens, 12.1.9 Cyclic pressure test, 12.1.9.1The cyclic static pressure loafing differential and sequence, 12.1.9.2The maximum air pressure differential and its relationship to the design pressure, and 12.1.9.3A statement as to whether or not tape or film, or both, were used to seal against air leakage and whether in the judgement of the test engineer the tape or film influenced the results of the test. 12.1.10 A description of the condition of the test specimens after completion of each portion of testing, including details of damage and any other pertinent observations, 12.1.11 A statement that the tests were conducted in accordance with this test method. 12.1.12 A statement of whether, upon completion of testing, the test specimens pass or fail in accordance with any specified criteria.32 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 33. A S T M Te s t s D e f i n e d : D U R A B I L I T YTesting LaboratoryArchitectural Testing, Inc.5906 Saxon Ave.Schofield, WI 54476Tel: 715-241-8624Fax: 715-241-8425Wanda Matiswmatis@archtest.comhttp://www.archtest.comNational Certified Testing Labs5 Leigh DriveYork, PA 17406Tel: 717-846-1200Fax: 717-767-4100Daniel Zeidersdzeiders@nctlinc.comhttp://www.nctlinc.comNTA Testing Laboratories, Inc.305 North Oakland AveNappanee, IN 46550Tel: 574-773-7975Fax: 574-773-2260Dale ArterTestlab@ntainc.comhttp://www.ntainc.comAssociated Costs$6,000 per test plus the supply of materials.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 33
  • 34. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y ASTM: E 90 Airborne Sound Transmission Loss of Building Partition and Elements (acoustic properties) 0.0 Preface This test establishes the materials sound absorbing behavior. 1.0 Scope 1.1 This test method covers the laboratory measurement of airborne sound transmission loss of building partitions such as walls of all kinds, operable partitions, floor-ceiling assemblies, doors, windows, roofs, panels, and other space-dividing elements. 5.0 Significance and use 5.1 Sound transmission loss refers to the response of specimens exposed to a diffuse incident sound field, and this is the test condition approached by this laboratory test method. The test results are therefore most directly relevant to the performance of similar specimens exposed to similar sound fields. They provide, however, a useful general measure of performance for the variety of sound fields to which a partition or element may typically be exposed. 7.0 Test Specimens 7.1 Size and Mounting - Any test specimen that is to typify a wall or floor shall be large enough to include all the essential construction elements in their nominal size, and in a proportion typical of actual use. The minimum dimension (excluding thickness) shall be 2.4 m (7’-10 1/2”), except that specimens of doors, office screens, and other smaller building elements shall be their customary size. Preformed panel structures should include at least two complete modules (panels plus edge mounting elements), although single panels can be tested. In all cases the test specimen shall be installed in a manner similar to actual construction, with a careful simulation of normal constraint and sealing conditions at the perimeter and at joints within the field of the specimen. 7.2 Aging of Specimens - Test specimens that incorporate materials for which there is a curing process (for example adhesives, plasters, concrete, mortar, damping compound) shall age for a sufficient interval before testing. Manufacturers may supply information about curing times for their products. 13.0 Report 13.1.1 A description of the test specimen. 13.1.6 Sound transmission losses rounded to the nearest decibel for the frequency bands required and any other measured. 13.1.6.1 Identify data affected by flanking transmission or background noise. 13.1.8 The temperature and humidity in the rooms during the measurement. 13.1.9 The volumes of the test rooms. 13.1.11 Single Number Ratings: 13.1.11.1 Sound Transmission Class - If single number rating are given, the sound transmission class described in Classification E 413 shall be included.34 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 35. A S T M Te s t D e f i n e d : A C O U S T I C13.1.11.2 Outdoor-Indoor Transmission Class - Where the test specimen may be used as part of a facade of a building, the Outdoor-Indoor transmission class should be included. This single number rating is intended to rate the effectiveness of building facade elements at reducing transportation noise intrusion.Testing LaboratoryRiverbank Acoustical Laboratories1512 S. Batavia Ave.Geneva, IL 60134-3300Tel: 630-232-0104Fax: 630-232-0138David MoyerRiverbank.Inquiries@alionscience.comhttp://riverbank.alionscience.comStork Twin City Testing Corp.662 Cromwell Ave.St. Paul, MN 55114-1776Tel: 651-645-3601Tel: 888-645-TESTFax: 651-659-7348Ari McKee-Sextonari.mckee@stork.comhttp://www.storktct.comAssociated Costs$3,000 for the first sample plus the supply and erection of materials.Note: Costs will vary from lab to lab and do not include the cost of materials or assembly. Compiled march 2009 35
  • 36. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y LEED and hemcrete: Evaluation of Potential LEED Point Opportunities The following are LEED credits that Hemcrete could potentially contribute towards on a LEED project. A project team filing LEED documentation would need MSDS sheets confirming this information, or documentation on Manufacturer letterhead stating the claims. (Please note that this document is based on requirements for LEED for New Construction v2.2. This is the current standard, which is being updated to v3.0 (a.k.a. LEED 2009) scheduled for release in Spring 2009.) Based upon our review of Hemcrete, it is potentially eligible for the following 9 LEED points. These points are subject to review and documentation on a project-by-project basis and assume Hemcrete components will eventually be produced in the Unites States. Potential LEED Credit List Overview 1. MRc4 Recycled Content: (3 points possible) • MRc4.1: 10% (Post-consumer + ½ Pre-consumer) – 1 point • MRc4.2: 20% (Post-consumer + ½ Pre-consumer) – 1 point • *An additional point is available for exemplary performance under Innovation and Design by achieving 30% recycled content. 2. MRc5 Regional Materials: (3 points possible) • MRc5.1: 10% Extracted, Processed & Manufactured Regionally – 1 point • MRc5.2: 20% Extracted, Processed & Manufactured Regionally – 1 point • *An additional point is available for exemplary performance under Innovation and Design by achieving 40%. 3. MRc6 Rapidly Renewable Materials: (2 points possible) • MRc6: 2.5% Rapidly Renewable Materials – 1 point • *An additional point is available for exemplary performance under Innovation and Design by achieving 5%. 4. EQc4 Low-Emitting Materials: (1 points possible) • EQc4.4: Composite Wood & Agrifiber Products – 1 point 5. Innovation and Design Credits: (4 points possible) • ID-MR: Cradle to Cradle Certified Building Products – 1 point • ID-MR: Climate Neutral Materials – 1 point • ID-SS/EQ: Non-chemical Termite Control – 1 point • ID-SS/EQ: Integrated Pest Management – 1 point A more detailed breakdown of these credits follows.36 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 37. LEED Compliance EvaluationMRc4 Recycled Content: (3 points possible)Summary1. Use building materials with recycled content.2. Recycled content value of a material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the cost of the assembly to determine the recycled value.3. Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization for Standardization Document, ISO 14021-Environmental labels and declarations-Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling) • Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in the process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it. • Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial, and institutional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer be used for its intended purpose.4. Post-Consumer recycled content is calculated using 100% of material value.5. Pre-Consumer recycled content is calculated using 50% of the material value. • Recycled Content Value ($) = (% Post-consumer Recycled Content x Material Cost) + 0.5 x (% Pre-consumer Recycled Content x Material Cost)6. For assembly (products that are composed of multiple materials) recycled content values, consider the percents by weight of the post- and pre-consumer recycled content in the assembly.7. In the case of supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) used in concrete that are recycled from other operations, it is allowable to calculate the recycled content value based on the mass of the cementitious materials only rather then on the entire concrete mix. (See Example 1: Sample Supplementary Cementitious materials Calculation)LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Description of the material• List Manufacturer• Identify the percentage of post-consumer and/or pre-consumer recycled content by weight Compiled march 2009 37
  • 38. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g yMRc5 Regional Materials: (3 points possible)Summary1. Use building materials that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured, within 500 miles of the project site for a minimum of 10% or 20% (based on cost) of the total materials value.2. IF only a fraction of the product or material is extracted/harvested/recovered and manufactured locally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.3. Reused and Salvaged materials may also contribute. Location they were salvaged is the point of extraction, and the location of the salvaged goods vendor is the point of manufacture.4. For material with more then one point of manufacture or extraction: • IF all within the 500-mile radius list the single item with the greatest distance. • IF a portion of the material is from beyond the 500-mile radius, list only the portion and associated cost satisfying the credit requirement • For assemblies, use multiple lines in your list. Base the proportionality of such product costs on the weight of their various components. (See Table 1)LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Name of manufacturer• Product cost• Distance between manufacturer and project site (address of manufacturing site)• Distance between extraction site and project site (address of extraction site)• Percentage of product, by weight, that meets both the extraction and manufacture criteria (See Table 1)MRc6 Rapidly Renewable Materials: (2 points possible)Summary1. Use rapidly renewable materials and products, which are made from plants that are typically harvested within a ten-year cycle or shorter.LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Product name for each renewable material• Product cost• Name of manufacturer• Percentage of product, by weight, for each material that meets the rapidly renewable criteriaEQc4.4 Low-Emitting Materials: (1 point possible)Summary1. Composite wood and agrifiber products used on the interior side of the weatherproofing system shall contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.2. Laminating adhesives used to fabricate on-site and shop-applied composite wood and agrifiber assemblies shall contain no added urea-formaldehyde.38 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 39. LEED Compliance EvaluationLEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• List of composite wood and agrifiber product• Confirmation that product does not contain any added urea-formaldehyde.Innovation and Design CreditsInnovation and Design (ID) credits are credit opportunities that are not associated with any single rating system.These are credits that were developed by individual project teams that submitted their innovative methods. Iftheir credit ideas are approved by USGBC, future projects can follow the credit methodology to achieve a point forfollowing the same methods. A list of accepted ID credits are available on the USGBC website. (www.usgbc.org)ID-SS/EQ: Non-Chemical Termite Control: (1 point possible)Summary• Eliminate the need for chemical-based termite control systems and reduce the use of pesticides.LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Documentation stating that the Hemcrete product is naturally termite resistant.ID-SS/EQ: Integrated Pest Management: (1 point possible)Summary1. Implement an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program that demonstrates a comprehensive approach that utilizes environmentally control methods.2. NOTE: Hemcrete won’t directly relate to this credit since it is primarily planning and method related. However, Hemcrete could help eliminate a need for toxic control methods.LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Documentation stating that the Hemcrete product is naturally pest resistant and would be a positive asset to an IPM program. Compiled march 2009 39
  • 40. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g yID-MR: Climate Neutral Materials: (1 point possible)Summary1. Purchase and install a minimum of 25% climate neutral products of project building materials by area.LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Documentation stating that Hemcrete is climate neutral.ID-MR: Cradle to Cradle Certified Building Products: (1 point possible)Summary1. Use Cradle to Cradle (C2C) Certified building materials and products for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost.LEED Documentation Requirements from Manufacturer:• Proof of Cradle to Cradle Certification40 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 41. LEED Compliance EvaluationIncrease demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, thereby reducing impactsresulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials.Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of thepre-consumer content constitutes at least 10% (based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project.The recycled content value of a material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of theassembly is then multiplied by the cost of assembly to determine the recycled content value.Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators shall not be includedin this calculation. Only include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included,providing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3–7.Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document,ISO 14021—Environmental labels and declarations—Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmentallabeling).Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial andinstitutional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer be used for its intendedpurpose.Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process.Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of beingreclaimed within the same process that generated it.Establish a project goal for recycled content materials and identify material suppliers that can achieve this goal.During construction, ensure that the specified recycled content materials are installed. Consider a range ofenvironmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials. Compiled march 2009 41
  • 42. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y Increase demand for building products that incorporate recycled content materials, thereby reducing the impacts resulting from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Use materials with recycled content such that the sum of post-consumer recycled content plus one-half of the pre-consumer content constitutes an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 4.1 (total of 20%, based on cost) of the total value of the materials in the project. The recycled content value of a material assembly shall be determined by weight. The recycled fraction of the assembly is then multiplied by the cost of assembly to determine the recycled content value. Mechanical, electrical and plumbing components and specialty items such as elevators shall not be included in this calculation. Only include materials permanently installed in the project. Furniture may be included, providing it is included consistently in MR Credits 3–7. Recycled content shall be defined in accordance with the International Organization of Standards document, ISO 14021—Environmental labels and declarations—Self-declared environmental claims (Type II environmental labeling). Post-consumer material is defined as waste material generated by households or by commercial, industrial and institutional facilities in their role as end-users of the product, which can no longer be used for its intended purpose. Pre-consumer material is defined as material diverted from the waste stream during the manufacturing process. Excluded is reutilization of materials such as rework, regrind or scrap generated in a process and capable of being reclaimed within the same process that generated it. Establish a project goal for recycled content materials and identify material suppliers that can achieve this goal. During construction, ensure that the specified recycled content materials are installed. Consider a range of environmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials.42 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 43. Increase demand for building materials and products that are extracted and manufactured within the region,thereby supporting the use of indigenous resources and reducing the environmental impacts resulting fromtransportation.Use building materials or products that have been extracted, harvested or recovered, as well as manufactured,within 500 miles of the project site for an additional 10% beyond MR Credit 5.1 (total of 20%, based on cost)of the total materials value. If only a fraction of the material is extracted/harvested/recovered and manufacturedlocally, then only that percentage (by weight) shall contribute to the regional value.Establish a project goal for locally sourced materials and identify materials and material suppliers that can achievethis goal. During construction, ensure that the specified local materials are installed. Consider a range of envi-ronmental, economic and performance attributes when selecting products and materials. Compiled march 2009 43
  • 44. Tradical Hemcrete Material Evaluation A m e r i c a n L i m e Te c h n o l o g y Reduce the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials by replacing them with rapidly renewable materials. Use rapidly renewable building materials and products (made from plants that are typically harvested within a ten-year cycle or shorter) for 2.5% of the total value of all building materials and products used in the project, based on cost. Establish a project goal for rapidly renewable materials and identify products and suppliers that can support achievement of this goal. Consider materials such as bamboo, wool, cotton insulation, agrifiber, linoleum, wheat- board, strawboard and cork. During construction, ensure that the specified renewable materials are installed.44 t h e kubAlA wAs h Atko Arc h itects, inc.
  • 45. Reduce the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating and/or harmful to the comfort andwell-being of installers and occupants.Composite wood and agrifiber products used on the interior of the building (defined as inside of the weather-proofing system) shall contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins. Laminating adhesives used to fabricate on-siteand shop-applied composite wood and agrifiber assemblies shall contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins.Composite wood and agrifiber products are defined as: particleboard, medium density fiberboard (MDF), ply-wood, wheatboard, strawboard, panel substrates and door cores. Materials considered fit-out, furniture, andequipment (FF&E) are not considered base building elements and are not included.Specify wood and agrifiber products that contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins. Specify laminating adhesivesfor field and shop applied assemblies that contain no added urea-formaldehyde resins. Compiled march 2009 45

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