TAWLA Tshipidi Mentorship Launch
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TAWLA Tshipidi Mentorship Launch

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The African Women Leadership Academy (TAWLA) is a non-profit making organization registered on the 5th of May 2010 in Botswana, the mandate of which is to empower young women and girls through ...

The African Women Leadership Academy (TAWLA) is a non-profit making organization registered on the 5th of May 2010 in Botswana, the mandate of which is to empower young women and girls through networking, mentoring and leadership skills training. TAWLA mentoring programme pairs youth with caring, responsible mentors, trained to focus on building trust, encouragement, and positive reinforcement to inspire and motivate the mentee to achieve personal goals. (Slides by Dr Maude Dokobe, University of Botswana)

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TAWLA Tshipidi Mentorship Launch TAWLA Tshipidi Mentorship Launch Presentation Transcript

  • TSHIPIDI WORKPLACE MENTORING LAUNCH ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITES OF MENTORS AND MENTEES PRESENTER: DR. MAUDE DIKOBE 26 SEPTEMBER , 2013
  • THE AFRICAN WOMEN LEADERSHIP ACADEMY
  • WHAT IS MENTORING?  Mentoring has a long and ancient history. It is based on the story of Greek Mythology told in Homer’s Odyssey. When Odysseus went to the Trojan War, he appointed his good friend Mentor, as a role model, guardian and adviser to his son Telemachus.  From these origins mentoring can be defined as providing guidance and support within a personal relationship that extends over a period of time.  Therefore mentoring is part of our lives (parents, teachers, friends etc.)
  • THE CONCEPT OF MENTORING  N.B. Mentoring is part and parcel of our lives We learn and take advice from parents, teachers, peers and older friends.  Mentoring has been used to describe a relationship in which an experienced person provides counsel and advise for a less experienced one.  Mentoring functions are carried out within the context of an on-going, caring relationship between the mentor and the protégé (Anderson and Shannon, 1988:40)
  • DIFFERENT TYPES OF MENTORING  Formal and Informal Mentoring  Peer mentoring  Intergenerational mentoring  Community service and leadership  Same Sex mentoring  Opposite sex mentoring  N.B. Mentoring not only found in the academy
  • PRINCIPLES AND VALUES OF MENTORING  Mentoring relationship most effective when mentor and mentee understand their responsibilities and are willing to assume them.  The relationship must be of mutual trust.
  • THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN MENTORING AND COACHING  The ICPD differentiates between coaching and mentoring. It is helpful to understand the differences and similarities. See www.briefgroup.uk/coaching and mentoring .html
  • THE MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIP  The ideal mentoring relationship is the personal and professional.  But each must understand and respect the parameters under which they operate  Establish clarity about roles and responsibilities  Develop trust and friendship
  • ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES IN MENTORING: MENTORS  Mentor’s role is that of a trusted and supportive guide  Willingness to make a commitment to share knowledge and expertise  Ability to commit to the mentoring task  Understand mentee’s cultural and ethnic and religious background  Be positive, patient, dependable, honest and sincere  Be firm. Have your mentee assume responsibilities and hold him or her accountable
  • IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO….
  • ROLES MENTORS CONT.  Understand your mentee’s background, goals, and aspirations  Share stories and anecdotes  Take mentee to professional meetings
  • ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITY IN MENTORING: MENTEE  Respect and trust for your mentor  Let your mentor know as soon as possible the kind of goals you want to achieve from the mentoring program  Take the initiative to ask for help or advice  Don’t be defensive  Assume the mentoring connection is strictly professional  Prepare yourself to move beyond the mentoring connection once, it has served the purpose.  Show your appreciation for the efforts made by your mentor
  • ROLES IN MENTORING: MENTEE CONT. Keep the door open to return to your mentor for assistance and advice in future
  • MENTOR/MENTEE RELATIONSHIP CONT.  Professional and less experienced mentee  Refer them to your networks for single issue mentoring  Mentee’s Personal Development plan (NICE)  Needs  Interests  Concerns  Expectations  Look for other mentors based on the re- evaluation of the mentee’s needs
  • WHY SPECIAL MENTORING PROGRAMS FOR THE YOUTH WHICH ARE STRUCTURED AND PROFESSIONAL ? a) Substance Abuse (alcohol and Drugs) b) Peer Pressure c) Self-image and personal insecurities d) Class or ethnic identity e) School Performance f) Sexuality g) Depression h) Career Development i) Information to resources and access to scholarship opportunities .
  • BENEFITS AND PITFALLS OF MENTOR MENTEE RELATIONSHIP  Cross gender mentoring  Same sex mentor – after work social activities  Provide emotional and psychological support  Over –familiarity may affect mentee/mentor relationship  Problems with a mentor who does not keep commitments  Possibility of becoming possessive of the mentee “ Take my Mentor Please”
  • BENEFITS AND PITFALLS CONT.  Mentee who is not honest and does not keep appointments “Take this mentee away please.  Joint Responsibility: Both mentor and mentee are responsible for keeping the information exchanged confidential.
  • WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT OR INTERESTING THINGS YOU HAVE LEARNT FROM THIS PRESENTATION?  What do you make of mentoring now?  Are you a mentee or mentor?  Who is your mentor?  How did you come to regard that person as your mentor?  Does the person know that you are their mentee?  What do you intend to do with the information you have gathered today?  Questions and comments
  • I've learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel. -- Maya Angelou DON’T GIVE UP o Peter Gabriel and Kate Bush “Don’t Give UP”
  • TSHIPIDI CAN OPEN DOORS, BUT MENTEES HAVE TO WALK THROUGH THEM