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Action.Reaction - Emotional Design
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Action.Reaction - Emotional Design

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Are we getting the intended emotional response we set out to achieve? In this seminar, we explore the powerful effects of emotion in design; from the way we create interfaces to the way we communicate …

Are we getting the intended emotional response we set out to achieve? In this seminar, we explore the powerful effects of emotion in design; from the way we create interfaces to the way we communicate with our clients.

We focus on methods that help us create engaging digital experiences that impacts the organization's brand entity by focusing on the customer’s wants and needs.

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  • 1. ACTION.REACTION
  • 2. For every action, there is anequal and opposite reaction.- Newton
  • 3. For every design action,there is an emotional reaction.
  • 4. ½
  • 5. What is emotional design?
  • 6. When you have two similar coffee products,emotional design is what makes you makesyou choose one over the other.
  • 7. Emotional design revolves around ourneeds as humans to bond and create aconnection between man and machine.
  • 8. ”Designing an interface to be usable islike a chef creating edible food.”Aaron Walters, Design for emotion
  • 9. “Emotional design is not about nice-to-have warm fuzzyexperiences, it’s central to daily life and the decision-making process for consumers.The more effectively we can apply emotional design inour site, the better conversion rates and sales will be.”Aaron Walter, Design for emotion
  • 10. SELF- ACTUALIZATION SELF-ESTEEM LOVE/ BELONGING SAFETY PHYSIOLOGICALMASLOW’S HEIRARCHY – HUMAN NEEDS
  • 11. PLEASURABLE CREATIVITY PROFICIENCY USABLE RELIABLE FUNCTIONAL DESIGN HEIRARCHY OF HUMAN NEEDS
  • 12. ¨ Attractive things work better ¨ - Don Norman
  • 13. APPEARANCE The Visceral Level Initial impact, touch and feelGets us excited and curious
  • 14. USABILITY The Behavioral Level How things work with relevant " functions that fulfills needs
  • 15. IMPACTThe Reflective Level (Long term) Personal satisfaction, self image. Meaning of a product and whether its worth remembering
  • 16. EMOTIONAL GOALS Appearance Usability ImpactThe Visceral Level The Behavioral Level The Reflective Level
  • 17. Our designs should be:APPEALING EFFECTIVE PLEASURABLE MEMORABLE Grab attention Guide the user Have fun Build a relationship The Emotional Design Scale
  • 18. Plutchik’s Emotion Wheel
  • 19. 3 Emotions to cultivate
  • 20. Emotionally intelligentinteractions = attention to detail that feels organic and human
  • 21. Emotionally intelligent interactions= attention to detail that feels organic and human
  • 22. Design I Motivation I Emotion
  • 23. What causes us to go from a passive¨browsing¨ state to an active ¨doing¨state?
  • 24. The protective frame
  • 25. The protective frame= Lets us focus on the object without distractions
  • 26. The protective frame= Helps us stay in the desired state of mind
  • 27. Making the functional emotional
  • 28. This carafe is not just a carafe.Meet BOO
  • 29. Great design awakens the senses andtakes the experience to the next level,beyond the unexpected.
  • 30. So how can we apply this to our projects that are not Heineken or Google?
  • 31. A sense of belonging
  • 32. Stimulating visualization
  • 33. Dare to stand out from the crowd
  • 34. Are these two different brands?
  • 35. Know your audience
  • 36. Reflective and social
  • 37. Seduction
  • 38. Gamification
  • 39. Do you see the difference?
  • 40. Engaging and relevant
  • 41. FUN
  • 42. Attention to detail
  • 43. Human-like interactions
  • 44. Jumping icons
  • 45. Shaking icons
  • 46. Embodiment – the 3 dots
  • 47. Tone of voice
  • 48. Dissonance
  • 49. Mascots
  • 50. Make it simple
  • 51. When something goes wrong
  • 52. “Emotional design is your insurance to maintainaudience trust when things aren’t going your way”Aaron Walter, Design for emotion
  • 53. The little extras
  • 54. The difference matters
  • 55. So… how can we make this happen?
  • 56. Emotional mapping
  • 57. Mental notes getmentalnotes.com
  • 58. CONVINCE OUR CLIENTS
  • 59. CollaborationFoundation of good design
  • 60. We develop Impact on the consumer The total experience DREAMS Vision, ambition, " MEANING economic value DIRECTION MEANING +The Brand, product and EMOTIONALcommunication strategy EXPERIENCE INTERACTION AESTHETICS + MEANING + Crossmedia concepts, EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCEsystems, product service DESIGN AESTHETICS + MEANING + Products, services, EMOTIONAL EXPERIENCE communication
  • 61. Think out of the box with a team of dedicatedmanagers, designers, programmers and copywriters.
  • 62. Emotional design turns casual users into fanatics,ready to tell others about their positive experience.– Aarron Walter
  • 63. The chain reaction:When designers care and motivate,companies get engaged.When companies show they care,customers create lasting bonds.
  • 64. Det er den som går seg vill som finner de nye veiene.- Nils Kjær
  • 65. Lillian Ayla ErsoyEmail: lillian.ersoy@bekk.noTwitter: LillaylaUX
  • 66. RESOURCES AND FURTHER READING§  Aaron Walter - Design for Emotion§  Stephen Anderson - Seductive design§  Don Norman - Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things§  Michael Apter - Reversal Theory: The Dynamics of Motivation, Emotion and Personality (2007)§  Sabina Idler - Not just pretty: Building emotion into your websites http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2012/04/12/building-emotion-into-your-websites/§  Tad Fry - Design with dissonance http://uxdesign.smashingmagazine.com/2011/10/13/design-with-dissonance/§  The evolutionary stability of a bi-stable system of emotions and motivations in species with an open-ended capacity for learning http://wiki.omega-research.org/The_evolutionary_stability_of_a_bi- stable_system_of_emotions_and_motivations_in_species_with_an_open-ended_capacity_for_learning
  • 67. RESOURCES AND FURTHER READING§  Design and Emotion Conference: http://www.dande2012.com/§  Design and Emotion Society: http://www.designandemotion.org/§  Researching meaning: Making sense of behaviour Simon Norris http://www.nomensa.com/blog/2012/researching-meaning-making-sense-of-behaviour/§  Heineken Club Concept. InSites Consulting http://blog.insites.eu/2012/09/20/our-heineken-concept-club-community-wins-best-presentation-award/§  http://littlebigdetails.com/§  http://designandemotion.org/blog/2011/07/29/getting-emotional-with-jeroen-van-erp/§  https://social.ogilvy.com/why-edible-isn%E2%80%99t-good-enough-the-importance-of-emotional-design/§  http://www.fortune3.com/blog/2012/03/web-design-study-first-impressions/