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Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
Group support plan 3.1
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Group support plan 3.1

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  • Transcript

    • 1. Group PositiveBehavioral Support Plan PresentationPaula Dickinson, Tom DeYoung, and Brittany Pike
    • 2. Description of Settingspecial education tables with chairslife skills class one teachereight coed class is 80 minutesstudents problem behaviorsnon-traditional primarily occur inclassroom the last 5 minutescluttered of class
    • 3. Description of the Targeted Studentsfour male studentsone senior, one sophomore, and two freshmanages 14-18two students coded Attention DeficitDisorder, one with Specific LearningDisability: Reading, one with Speech andLanguagewhite, lower-middle class
    • 4. Problem Behaviorhittingpunchingshoving grabbingheadlocks trippingpulling chairs pullingpoking overall aggressivekicking behavior
    • 5. What happens whenthese behaviors occur? The teacher tells the students to stop. The students continue to “horseplay”. In extreme cases, a discipline referral is made.
    • 6. Operational Definition of Target Behavior Physically aggressive contact from one student to another is defined as: hitting, punching, shoving, headlocks, pulling chairs, poking, kicking, grabbing, tripping, or pulling, regardless of intent.
    • 7. Why is the Behavior Occurring?The teacher utilized a functional assessmentchecklist to predict the function of theproblem behavior.
    • 8. The function of thebehavior differs from student to student. Attention Impulse Control Social Acceptance Lack of Social Awareness Boredom
    • 9. ResultsStudents are given They attempt to gainunstructured time. peer and adult attention.
    • 10. Data CollectionEvent recording (frequency) was used to collect data.Check-marks were used to represent the number ofnegative physical contacts between students asdefined by the operational definition.This data was collected during the last 5 minutes ofclass for 5 consecutive days.
    • 11. Data Collection Sheet Target Behavior: Any physically aggressive contact, from one student to another, including, but not limited to: hitting, punching, shoving, headlocks, pulling chairs, poking, kicking, grabbing, tripping, pulling, regardless of intent. ✓= # of instances Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20
    • 12. Raw DataDay FrequencyDay 1 9Day 2 6Day 3 10Day 4 8Day 5 7
    • 13. # of Negative Physical Contacts Per 5 minutes at end of Class Day Baseline Intervention 10 8# of Negative Physical Hits 6 Goal Line 4 2 0 Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 Days
    • 14. Baseline Data AnalysisThe minimum amount of negative, physicalinteractions was 6, and the maximum was 10.The baseline mean was 8 negative, physicalinteractions.There did not appear to be a trend to thefrequency of incidents.The teacher observed that the behaviorfollowed the signaling of the end ofinstruction (stimulus).
    • 15. ABC Antecedent Behavior Consequence teacher signals negative adult and peerend of instruction physical contact attention
    • 16. Target Replacement DesiredBehavior Behavior Behavioraggressive socialize non- non-aggressive behavior aggressively behavior
    • 17. The Replacement Behavior DefinedThrough conversational techniquesand “get to know you” activities,students will receive peerattention and socialize withoutphysical contact.Operational Definition: Socializingnon-aggressively is defined as: nothitting, punching, kicking, etc. toreceive peer attention.
    • 18. The Goal: (Desired Behavior)To teach students positive ways tointeract and socialize.In order to receive positive adult andpeer attention, students will socializewith peers non aggressively withoutteacher initiation and intervention.To increase non-aggressive peerinteractions to 100%, and to decreaseaggressive peer interactions to 0.
    • 19. The Management Plan
    • 20. Step 1 Students collect data on their classmates’ behaviors during the last 5 minutes of class, using the same data collection sheet and operational definition.The teacher shares the baseline data with the students.
    • 21. Step 2 The class discusses the data that was collected.A discussion on expected behaviors during thelast 5 minutes of class takes place. Real life social scenarios socializing with friends socializing with family socializing with strangers
    • 22. What do we do? What should we do?
    • 23. Step 3The teacher explains the goal to the students: tosocialize with peers non aggressively withoutteacher initiation and intervention.Teacher and students discuss a reinforcement plan(what students would like to earn) and schedule.
    • 24. Reinforcement high school students love candy! homework passes fun day!
    • 25. Reinforcement PlanA chart is placed next to the door with students’ first names.As students are walking out of class, the teacher will hand them each a sticker ifthe individual did not demonstrate the target behavior (independent groupcontingency)If all students get a sticker, the class gets a sticker (interdependent groupcontingency).When a student reaches 5 stickers, they get an available prize of their choosing(pens, candy, stress ball, homework pass).When the whole class reaches 7 stickers, they will receive a “fun day” (movie day,PJ day, ice cream party, pizza party).Group Management System: Independent: because students are working towards a prize for themselves. Interdependent: because students are working together to earn a class reward.
    • 26. Reinforcement Chart 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19Dan ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯Tim ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯Jen ✯ ✯ ✯ ✯Class ✯ ✯
    • 27. Step 4The teacher introduces activities, which will take place during thelast 5 minutes of each class period. Such as: Situational Questions (ex: If you were stuck on an island...) Find someone who... Show and TellThese activities will introduce, teach, and reinforce sociallyacceptable behaviors (appropriate conversational volume andtopics, proximity, physical contact only when instructed by teacherfor purpose of activity, etc)
    • 28. Step 5Intervention begins, and data is collected!
    • 29. Data Collection SheetTarget Behavior: Any physically aggressive contact, from one student to another,including, but not limited to: hitting, punching, shoving, headlocks, pulling chairs, poking,kicking, grabbing, tripping, pulling, regardless of intent.✓= # of instances Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓✓ Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 ✓✓✓ ✓ ✓ Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 ✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓✓✓✓ ✓✓✓ ✓✓ ✓✓ Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 ✓
    • 30. Raw DataDay 6 3Day 7 1Day 8 1Day 9 0Day 10 0Day 11 5Day 12 6Day 13 3Day 14 2Day 15 2Day 16 0Day 17 1Day 18 0Day 19 0Day 20 0
    • 31. # of Negative Physical Contacts Per 5 minutes at end of Class Day Baseline Intervention 10 8# of Negative Physical Hits Trend Line 6 Goal Line 4 2 Trend Line 0 Day 1 Day 2 Day 3 Day 4 Day 5 Day 6 Day 7 Day 8 Day 9 Day 10 Day 11 Day 12 Day 13 Day 14 Day 15 Day 16 Day 17 Day 18 Day 19 Day 20 Days
    • 32. Data AnalysisChange in Mean: Baseline Mean=8.0,Intervention Mean=1.6Change in Level: There was a large,immediate drop in level from the baselinedata point of 6 to the intervention data pointof 3 and the intervention mean of 1.6.Latency of Change: The intervention had animmediate impact by dramatically reducingincidents of physical contact.
    • 33. Data Analysis cont.Variability: The baseline variability was ahigh of 10 and low of 6 incidents of physicalcontact. The after intervention variabilitywas a high of 6 and a low of 0.Percentage of non-overlapping data: Thereis 100% of non-overlapping data.The Intervention data fell below the goallinefor most of the intervention, including theend of the data cycle, proving theintervention to be sucessful.
    • 34. SummaryBased on the recorded data: the change inmean, change in level, latency of change,variability and percentage of non overlappingdata; all support the intervention andprocedures as being successful.
    • 35. ReflectionThe intervention worked. There was a hiccup whenstudents came back from vacation, but the teacher wasable to reestablish the plan for success in the end.The intervention most likely worked because thestudents were given ownership of their learning andsocial time. In addition, they also received attention,which is what they wanted.The antecedent and the desired behaviors werechanged multiple times.It was difficult to find out the antecedent for an entireclass, and a plan that would work for all, or most.
    • 36. Difficult to come up with a realistic plan on ahypothetical situation.Because we based it on a behavior that we arefamiliar with, it was easier to come up with a plan.We soon figured out that because we had so manycomponents we could not split up tasks. We had to doeverything together.
    • 37. RecommendationsKnow your students. What reinforcement is going towork for them?Know what exactly the student wants. In other classes,students might be displaying the same behaviorbecause of other reasons.Make sure that operational definitions are clearlydefined from the beginning.Use keynote graphing! It was easier to work with, andless complicated to transport.Use your resources!
    • 38. Don’t reinvent the wheel.Make sure you have enough time for the planningprocess.If the school has a school wide PBS system in place,the plan would be easier to implement or may not evenbe needed.
    • 39. Thank You

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