Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

The Business Value and the Five A+ Attributes Of An Amazing Community Manager

5,313
views

Published on

Learn the business value of investing in your community management. Also see what it takes to be an amazing community manager!

Learn the business value of investing in your community management. Also see what it takes to be an amazing community manager!

Published in: Education, Technology, Business

1 Comment
5 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • It is very useful and helpful.Thanks for sharing.
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
5,313
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
31
Comments
1
Likes
5
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • 1. Social media has the power to raise brand awareness, increase customer retention, drive leads and meet your organization’s business goals to result in a direct ROI 2. You have the ability to control, moderate and get involved in the conversations about your brand, making it easier to identify positive experiences and provide you opportunities to turn around a negative interaction. 3 Listening on social media will provide you insight into your competitors, how they interact with your target customer, and learn what your audience wants from your brand. Social media is the most effective competitive analysis and focus group you can conduct. 4. Allows your brand to exercise the two meanings of likeable: The literal “like” action to drive a growing community and The Social brand ambassadors that love your brand and express their enthusiasm online for their friends and followers to see, effectively amplifying your word of mouth reach.
  • F on a paper.
  • -Whether you’re a small brand just getting started or a big brand trying to penetrate a new area or launch a new product, through community management is the perfect way to build brand awareness. -Takes time and effort to reach a new audience; there will be tons of questions to answer when attempting to build brand awareness and a community manager will need to tame the crowd -When done right, building brand awareness through social media can be the key to a new brand or product’s success
  • Even big brands need to keep their awareness alive – Logitech is a perfect example. This global brand launches new products frequently and uses community management to reach out to their fans. Announcing products via social media is an excellent way to build awareness about your brand and the new product and community management can effectively achieve this.
  • Many companies use community management as an opportunity to develop their brand’s voice, tone, and personality. Brands need to make sure that their voice is relatable to their target audience and an accurate representation of the brand’s core values.
  • GemsAround is a jewelry business with a heavy focus on customer service: if a customer can dream up a piece, GemsAround will make it. To send this message, GemsAround developed Ruby, who quickly became the voice of the brand and answered all customer service-related inquiries. Ruby posted weekly updates to the page, answered any questions about GemsAround products or services, and made product recommendations to fans. Ruby is girly, fun, and relatable to the GemsAround target demographic.
  • As much as brands want to be heard, it’s just as important for brands to use community management as a listening tool. The more companies listen, the more they’ll understand about their consumers. The more you understand, the better product/service you can provide.
  • On the Voices Against Brain Cancer FB page, community members are constantly sharing stories and photos of loved ones affected by brain cancer. Everyone’s story is different: some are personal stories related to the day to day hardships of people living with cancer. Some community members are mourning a loved one. Some are survivors sharing words of encouragement. Everyone has a different reason for being on the page. Since everyone’s story is different and the topic is so sensitive, it’s important for VABC to read each post, understand why these people are engaging with them, and respond as carefully and appropriately as possible.
  • One of the most valued reasons for a company to seek out Social Media marketing agencies is to grow their fanbase and acquire new customers through strong community management.
  • Spending only $500, dentist Dr. Bob Wagstaff created his first YouTube video. In less than 3 years that video has been seen more than 16 million times and helped to generate over $1.6 million in sales and contracts with Wal-Mart and CVS Pharmacies. Community management strategies: engaging user videos.
  • One of the best things about social media is the easy access to so many people who are fans of your brand already. The socialsphere is the prefect place to show your appreciation for your brand advocates. A goal of CMs should be to set out to find these advocates and REWARD them! With rewarding should also come the element of surprise. *GIVE AWAY SOMETHING* You too can surprise anyone you’d like via social media so long as there’s strategy behind it!
  • Sprinkles NYC announces a password to get a free cupcake everyday! This has an element of fun to it for the fans AND gets people in the door of their store.
  • Fan feedback is important to community managers because it allows them to hear exactly what the customer is saying. It also creates a relationship that emotionally attaches the customer with the brand.
  • Hpnotiq has their own recipes, but they also encourage fans to create and post their own recipes. Hpnotiq listens and shares out to its larger community giving each fan who creates a recipe the opportunity to be heard and feel important.
  • Fan feedback is important to community managers because it allows them to hear exactly what the customer is saying. It also creates a relationship that emotionally attaches the customer with the brand.
  • -One of the many ways community management can add value to your business is through its capacity to develop long-term relationships with your biggest brand ambassadors. -People trust other people more than they trust brands, and they relate better to a consumer’s story than they do to a brand’s story. It makes sense, then, to have real people who are out and about, sharing their love of your brand to the world. You can find and develop relationships with these individuals through community management. -Once you’ve identified your brand ambassadors, you should develop a social framework or some kind of program to bring them all together to share their love of your brand on a regular basis.
  • -Restaurant.com identified their biggest brand advocates through a survey that asked customers to share their Restaurant.com experience. The ones who rated their experience the highest and shared their stories were then asked to join an exclusive Facebook group, called The Food Family. -Nearly 4,000 members strong, these brand ambassadors share stories, provide feedback, and receive star treatment, special deals and an inside scoop on Restaurant.com news. -These customers feel particularly valued, and as a result are the first line of defense on the Facebook page. They’re quick to defend anyone attacking RDC, and they’re also more than willing to share their positive experiences with the rest of the Restaurant.com community.
  • -One of the greatest features of community management is its capacity to change consumer perception about your brand. By taking the right steps, you can turn an angry customer into a happy one, sometimes even converting them to a lifelong brand advocate. -These steps include publicly acknowledging the customer’s complaint, taking their complaint offline to determine how best to resolve the issue, and then taking action to actually resolve the issue in an efficient manner.
  • One McDonald’s customer, Fadra, had taken her son on the last day of that particular Happy Meal promotion to get the final missing Marvel hero, but got the Littlest Pet Shop instead. She sent an angry tweet to the fast food restaurant. As a result, McDonald’s sent the missing Marvel figurine with a handwritten note to Fadra. People love to feel valued, and a great way of doing that is through handwritten notes and real, non-electronic mail. They get excited, they take pictures, they post to twitter, etc… all because a brand proves there are real people behind the brand who care about them. The result? A happy boy with his completed set of figurines from McDonald’s. Oh yeah, and Fadra happened to have a popular blog where she shared the story. The result for McDonald’s from an offline good-will gesture was a positive blog that receives 50,000 views a month. She went from upset customer to one of McDonald’s best brand advocates, and she’s online all the time, defending McDonald’s From one gesture, there is a ton of positive sentiment for McDonald's. The social media team was quick to point out that while it wasn’t a crisis – effectively they were dealing with an upset four-year-old and a mother who had to deal with an upset four-year-old – it was an opportunity to go the extra mile.
  • -One of the greatest features of community management is its capacity to change consumer perception about your brand. By taking the right steps, you can turn an angry customer into a happy one, sometimes even converting them to a lifelong brand advocate. -These steps include publicly acknowledging the customer’s complaint, taking their complaint offline to determine how best to resolve the issue, and then taking action to actually resolve the issue in an efficient manner.
  • One McDonald’s customer, Fadra, had taken her son on the last day of that particular Happy Meal promotion to get the final missing Marvel hero, but got the Littlest Pet Shop instead. She sent an angry tweet to the fast food restaurant. As a result, McDonald’s sent the missing Marvel figurine with a handwritten note to Fadra. People love to feel valued, and a great way of doing that is through handwritten notes and real, non-electronic mail. They get excited, they take pictures, they post to twitter, etc… all because a brand proves there are real people behind the brand who care about them. The result? A happy boy with his completed set of figurines from McDonald’s. Oh yeah, and Fadra happened to have a popular blog where she shared the story. The result for McDonald’s from an offline good-will gesture was a positive blog that receives 50,000 views a month. She went from upset customer to one of McDonald’s best brand advocates, and she’s online all the time, defending McDonald’s From one gesture, there is a ton of positive sentiment for McDonald's. The social media team was quick to point out that while it wasn’t a crisis – effectively they were dealing with an upset four-year-old and a mother who had to deal with an upset four-year-old – it was an opportunity to go the extra mile.
  • A+
  • A community manager needs to be analytical so that they can grasp why you're monitoring and responding in social networks in the first place. The community manager needs to be able to answer questions like, where does your community live? Who is your audience? What are your goals in being an active brand on social networks, and how can you best achieve those? The community manager also needs to have tactical analytical skills that will help them find that information through various tools and draw out insights from there.
  • Birchbox is a monthly subscription service that delivers curated samples of new high-end beauty, grooming, and lifestyle products. Birchbox’s goal is to revolutionize the way consumers discover products and deliver to brand partners a better way to access customers – but to do this they had to access that unique customer base and change the way that they shop for beauty products. This is where being analytical about community management was essential for BirchBox. They had to be very smart about understanding where their community existed within social networks; what Birchbox recognized was that this community they were trying to reach had interests beyond beauty products. Birchbox has targeted their key demographic, whom are active users of Pinterest, by creating inspiration boards on the site are in line with the common interest of their community members.
  • Birchbox used this same concept across other key social networks where they found their demographic participating. They discovered that current Birchbox users are avid watchers of certain television shows
  • The @birchbox community management team began live-tweeting the shows, engraining themselves within a non-product conversation that was happening amongst their customers. And as Birchbox began to identify interest from men through their analysis of their changing community landscape, they adapted and created a male-focused brand voice on @BirchboxMan
  • Community managers also need to be aware of the conversations happening about the brand, and the landscape around the brand. This is the pro-active element of community management, where community managers are actively engaging with the community and are aware of the resources needed to appropriately contribute to the needs of the community.
  • Four Seasons uses their main handle to promote local handles, national scale news, and hashtag Twitter chat promotions such as #FriFotos. Not every four seasons property has it’s own Twitter handle, but they are aware of the communities where there is a strong conversation happening and have created specialized handles for those locations that need personalized attention.
  • The Four Seasons is aware of the community needs and has appropriately allocated resources to those conversations. They have grown their community by connecting with and retweeting local influencers, and joining in conversations outside of just hotel chatter – they are vocal experts on the destinations , regardless if you’re a Four Seasons guest.
  • Alert is perhaps one of the most important competencies a community manager can have. This requires a CM to be action-oriented. They need to listen, respond, and engage so that the community feels heard.
  • Listen. Respond. Engage. And repeat! This process is the cornerstone of strong community management, as seen here by the responsive brand, Toys R Us. Their community managers are alert to the questions, concerns, and comments across social networks and respond to every issue or sentiment with helpful, actionable responses.
  • Listen. Respond. Engage. And repeat! This process is the cornerstone of strong community management, as seen here by the responsive brand, Toys R Us. Their community managers are alert to the questions, concerns, and comments across social networks and respond to every issue or sentiment with helpful, actionable responses.
  • Community Managers MUST be authentic. In order to build sustainable, rich relationships within the community the community manager must have a clear voice. Customers and fans want to interact with a person, not a company, not an FAQ page, not a standardized response. The most successful community managers have the agency from their company to be original and create an authentic experience that tells the story of your brand. They need to have the power and skills to create that brand experience!
  • Boloco, a Boston-based fast casual burrito chain, is a great example of authenticity in community management. The brand has a well-developed a brand voice on social media channels which they use to build relationships on a personal level. They create an authentic experience in all interactions.
  • Boloco, a Boston-based fast casual burrito chain, is a great example of authenticity in community management. The brand has a well-developed a brand voice on social media channels which they use to build relationships on a personal level. They create an authentic experience in all interactions.
  • Almost every single community management attribute we’ve discussed so far requires adaptability. The social media landscape is changing everyday, and with that, community needs, behaviors, and expectations are changing just as quickly. A great community manager is able to shift focus from answering customer service inquires on Twitter to sourcing and curating content on a Pinterest board without missing a beat. Community managers must be not just flexible with social changes, but also active in keeping the pulse on what’s new, what the next big thing will be for their community. And how to grow with the community through those changes.
  • In 2009 Domino’s Pizza had no social media presence, until two employees uploaded a video to YouTube of themselves doing disgusting things to a sandwich before it went out on delivery. They are a great example adaptability, look how far they have come today.
  • Domino’s set up a Twitter account to respond and reassure customers that this was an isolated incident and they were taking the necessary measures to correct it. From there, Domino’s leveraged the help of your still-loyal customers who became Twitter followers. Domino’s generated a unique voice on social making it a priority to respond to negative feedback and welcoming new ideas from fans and followers. They adapted from a company with no social presence, to one with extremely response, active community management addressing complaints and praise on a near constant basis.
  • Review your practices and make sure you hit all these marks.
  • Consistency - Social Media is a rapidly changing landscape and cannot be mastered in a six week crash course. LCC provides biweekly trainings (offered all year) along with other opportunities to learn such as guest lecturers, networking events, tutoring, and an exclusive homeroom for students to collaborate. Trainings and webinars are hosted live, but can be accessed later at a time that works best for your team. Human Powered —Unlike other social media training programs, you won’t just be pressing play on a pre-recorded video. LCC hosts trainings with chat to answer questions live, one on one consulting sessions, and in-person events and workshops. Community —The opportunity to participate in a collaborative environment is crucial for your social media team’s success LCC brings together a network of community managers and social media professionals to share experiences and brainstorm with, crowdsource ideas from, and more. Thought Leadership – Likeable media is one of the leading social media agencies in the industry and is led by NY Times Bestselling author, Dave Kerpen. LCC is the combined resources of the staff at Likeable and the lessons learned over the years in the space, in a teachable program.
  • CMAT - To start, your community manager will take the CMAT - the Community Manager Assessment Test. This test measures and evaluates the current knowledge of community management and social media. Social Studies - Your community manager will participate in bi-weekly, in-depth training webinars. Each webinar is accompanied by a live Twitter chat to answer questions in real time. Extracurricular Activities - LCC provides opportunities for continuing education throughout the year. Enrollment includes access to workshops, opportunities to network with other community managers, and more! Likeable U - Every LCC student gets a complimentary ticket to Likeable U, our annual full-day social media conference. Community managers will get hands-on experience working with Twitter, Facebook, Google+, Radian6, and other must-have tools. Tutoring - Hourly tutoring is available whether your community manager is looking for added guidance, or just wants some one-on-one time to discuss specific brand challenges. Homeroom - LCC students get exclusive access to Homeroom, a Facebook group where Community Managers can connect, and share resources. It’s the perfect place to ask questions and receive instant feedback from tons of Community Managers and the Likeable team! Lunch and Learn - Your Community Manager will have access to our Lunch & Learn program featuring monthly in-person workshops with representatives from industry leaders like LinkedIn, Klout, and more! It’s firsthand knowledge straight from the source
  • CMAT & Workshop – To start, both Likeable and your team will have a full day in-person meeting to define the goals and objectives of the corporate training. The group will go over the CMAT - the Community Manager Assessment Test – to gauge the experience level of the group. Lesson Plan Brainstorm – After the initial workshop both Likeable and your team will meet to review the outline for the corporate training. Likeable will present the working lesson plan and we will collaborate and brainstorm tweaks if needed. Custom Creation – Once deciding on a final lesson plan, Likeable sets out to create a completely original and custom corporate training for your team. The training will be tailored to your industry and company with competitive examples, company case studies, and more. Corporate Training – Likeable teaches you and your entire team everything they need to know about social media management for your brand. Likeable professors/presenters come from senior leadership and have experience speaking at multiple conferences, universities, and companies. Continuing Education – Following corporate training, your company is given access to tangible deliverables that will set them up for success when executing their social media plans. Delivery of follow up materials will include post-survey, copies of the modules, best practices guide, sample reports, etc.
  • Transcript

    • 1. The Business Value and the Five A+ Attributes Of AnAmazing Community Manager Presented by Dave Kerpen #likeable http://slideshare.net/likeable
    • 2. Have a Question?• Tweet questions to @LikeableCC or using the hashtag #likeable• Ask questions on our Facebook page at fb.com/likeablecc• Use the chat bar in GoToWebinar to ask questions! #likeable
    • 3. Agenda• Why Invest In Community Management?• 10 Ways Community Management Can Add Value To Your Business• 5 A+ Attributes Of An Amazing Community Manager #likeable
    • 4. Who is Likeable? #likeable
    • 5. Why Community Management? #likeable
    • 6. The Difference It Can MakeUnlikeable Social Media Likeable Social Media #likeable
    • 7. One Comment Becomes Two #likeable
    • 8. Worst Moments Become Public #likeable
    • 9. Employees Can Air Dirty Laundry #likeable
    • 10. What Do These Have in Common? Poor Community Management! #likeable
    • 11. Top 10 Ways CommunityManagement Can Add Value To Your Business #likeable
    • 12. 1. Increase Brand Awareness #likeable
    • 13. Brands Doing It RightLogitech* #likeable *client
    • 14. 2. Build Your Brand Voice #likeable
    • 15. Brands Doing It RightGemsaround* #likeable *client
    • 16. 3. Understand Your Audience #likeable
    • 17. Brands Doing It RightVoices Against Brain Cancer* #likeable *client
    • 18. 4. Acquire New Customers #likeable
    • 19. Brands Doing It RightOrabrush #likeable
    • 20. 5. Reward & Retain Customers #likeable
    • 21. Brands Doing It RightSprinkles #likeable
    • 22. 6. Receive Fan Feedback #likeable
    • 23. Brands Doing It RightHpnotiq* #likeable *client
    • 24. 7. Find Brand Ambassadors #likeable
    • 25. Brands Doing It RightEntenmann’s* #likeable *client
    • 26. 8. Develop Long-Term Relationships #likeable
    • 27. Brands Doing It RightRestaurant.com* #likeable *client
    • 28. 9. Change Customer Perception #likeable
    • 29. Brands Doing It RightMcDonald’s #likeable
    • 30. 10. Provide Customer Service #likeable
    • 31. Brands Doing It RightZappos #likeable
    • 32. Recap #likeable
    • 33. Five A+ Attributes Of AnAmazing Community Manager #likeable
    • 34. 5 A+ Attributes For an AmazingCommunity Manager • Analytical • Aware • Alert • Authentic • Adaptable #likeable
    • 35. Analytical• Where does your community live?• Who is your audience?• What are your goals and how will you achieve them?• How can you learn from the community? #likeable
    • 36. Analytical• Birchbox on Pinterest #likeable
    • 37. Analytical• Birchbox on YouTube #likeable
    • 38. Analytical• Birchbox on Twitter #likeable
    • 39. Aware• Are you pro-actively joining conversations with your community members?• Do you have the appropriate resources allocated to deal with priority community engagement?• Are prepared to service the needs of the community? #likeable
    • 40. Aware• Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts #likeable
    • 41. Aware• Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts #likeable
    • 42. Alert• Are you listening to the community• Are you responding to their comments?• Are you actively engaging and reacting to community sentiment? #likeable
    • 43. Alert• Toys “R” Us #likeable
    • 44. Alert• Toys “R” Us #likeable
    • 45. Authentic• Do you have a clear understanding of the brand voice and tone?• Do you provide relevant content or thought leadership on topics related to your brand?• Do you authentically build relationships with your customers and community members? #likeable
    • 46. Authentic• Boloco Twitter #likeable
    • 47. Authentic• Boloco Facebook #likeable
    • 48. Adaptable• Are you nimble to react to a changing social landscape?• Are you flexible enough to grow with the community? #likeable
    • 49. Adaptable• Domino’s Pizza YouTube #likeable
    • 50. Adaptable• Domino’s Pizza Twitter #likeable
    • 51. Are you A+? Analytical Aware Alert Authentic Adaptable #likeable
    • 52. Need Help?• For info on social media training for your community manager contact Gaby at gaby@likeable.com• For info about social media execution for your brand contact Carrie at carriet@likeable.com• Email TODAY and get a free copy of Likeable Social Media
    • 53. Why LCC? #likeable
    • 54. Logistics Se p t. 10 $ #likeable
    • 55. Contact Us/Thanks!/Grand Prize • Email TODAY and get a free copy of Likeable Social Media! • Carrie Tylawsky - carriet@likeable.com • Gaby Piazza – gaby@likeable.com #likeable

    ×