Nutraceutical Adjunts To Bhrt
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For the health professional that wants to learn about the effects of nutrition on hormone balance.

For the health professional that wants to learn about the effects of nutrition on hormone balance.

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  • This is my pharmacy on the corner of a mixed-use development (Town Green Village or Old Downtown Windsor in Windsor, CA ~ 65 miles north of San Francisco). We live across the street from the pharmacy.
  • http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951968-2,00.html
  • http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951968-1,00.htmlhttp://www.23andme.comhttp://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1813984,00.htmlFor instance, Bygren's research showed that in Overkalix, boys who enjoyed those rare overabundant winters — kids who went from normal eating to gluttony in a single season — produced sons and grandsons who lived shorter lives. Far shorter: in the first paper Bygren wrote about Norrbotten, which was published in 2001 in the Dutch journal ActaBiotheoretica, he showed that the grandsons of Overkalix boys who had overeaten died an average of six years earlier than the grandsons of those who had endured a poor harvest. Once Bygren and his team controlled for certain socioeconomic variations, the difference in longevity jumped to an astonishing 32 years. Later papers using different Norrbotten cohorts also found significant drops in life span and discovered that they applied along the female line as well, meaning that the daughters and granddaughters of girls who had gone from normal to gluttonous diets also lived shorter lives. To put it simply, the data suggested that a single winter of overeating as a youngster could initiate a biological chain of events that would lead one's grandchildren to die decades earlier than their peers did. How could this be possible? Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951968,00.html#ixzz1ESRtG42QBOTTOM LINE: Remember the Human Genome Project? Completed in March 2000, the project found that the human genome contains something like 25,000 genes; it took $3 billion to map them all. The human epigenome contains an as yet unknowable number of patterns of epigenetic marks, a number so big that Ecker won't even speculate on it. The number is certainly in the millions. A full epigenome map will require major advances in computing power. When completed, the Human Epigenome Project (already under way in Europe) will make the Human Genome Project look like homework that 15th century kids did with an abacus. But the potential is staggering. For decades, we have stumbled around massive Darwinian roadblocks. DNA, we thought, was an ironclad code that we and our children and their children had to live by. Now we can imagine a world in which we can tinker with DNA, bend it to our will. It will take geneticists and ethicists many years to work out all the implications, but be assured: the age of epigenetics has arrived. Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1951968-4,00.html#ixzz1ESTAyUQ5
  • A model for the regulation of inflammatory biomarkers. Disease is normally because of dysregulation of numerous inflammatory biomarkers (represented by each bulb). Complete inhibition of a single biomarker (such as COX-2) is more likely to be toxic and unlikely to cure the disease.However, downregulation of several biomarkers is more likely to partially inhibit the dysregulated inflammation, being less toxic and more efficient in treating the disease.
  • The Pharmacogenomics Knowledge Base [PharmGKB]https://www.pharmgkb.org/index.jspNew Targets and New Drugs for ChemopreventionThe importance of suppressing DNA mutation has provided a strong impetus to develop new agents for this purpose. Clinical trials that have used exogenous antioxidants or free-radical scavengers (such as ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, or β-carotene) as chemopreventive agents to suppress mutation have been markedly unsuccessful in most cases. Therefore, a new approach to control ROS, RNO, and electrophilicxenobiotics has been developed, based on the intrinsic mechanisms used by the body to deactivate potentially carcinogenic molecules. This approach, originally termed 'electrophile counterattack' by Talalay and colleagues,[17] now focuses on Nrf2 (nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2), which is a leucine zipper-type transcription factor and a key enhancer of the activity of a number of genes that are cytoprotective because of the ability of their respective protein products to deactivate toxic molecules.[18,19,20,21] These proteins, known as phase 2 enzymes, directly destroy ROS, or deactivate a large number of potentially harmful electrophilic molecules, or stabilize the oxidation and reduction potential of the cell (i.e., reduce oxidative stress). They include essentially all the enzymes of glutathione synthesis and transfer (conjugation with glutathione is a principal defense against harmful xenobiotics), as well as quinonereductase, epoxidehydrolase, thioredoxin, catalase, superoxide dismutase, and hemeoxygenase.The new attempts to use upregulation of Nrf2 activity as a mechanism for chemoprevention rely on a coordinated upregulation of an entire battery of cytoprotective macromolecules that are intrinsic to the cell, rather than trying to use extrinsic small molecules as direct agents for deactivating harmful species. This new strategy provides a marked amplification of the action of chemopreventive agents, since the small molecules that induce Nrf2 activity are not themselves consumed in the deactivation of ROS, RNO, and electrophiles; rather, these inducers amplify physiological protective mechanisms, and this action occurs within the cell, at sites where it is needed. As a result of this amplification effect, one molecule of a chemopreventive inducer can effectively neutralize the harmful effects of a much larger number of potent mutagenic molecules.Nrf2 is now known to regulate its various responsive cytoprotective genes through a common DNA regulatory element, called the antioxidant-response element (ARE).[22] Nrf2 is sequestered by the inhibitory protein, Keap1, until inducers react with cysteinethiol residues on Keap1, which causes a conformational change in the Keap1-Nrf2 complex and the release of Nrf2, allowing Nrf2 to activate responsive genes (Figure 2). Many chemopreventive agents activate the Nrf2-Keap1-ARE pathway; these range from inducers naturally found in food, such as resveratrol, curcumin, and sulforaphane, to synthetic molecules such as oltipraz, which are all presently being tested in clinical trials.[18,19,20,21] Nrf2 can also be activated by phosphorylation, and many signal transduction cascades, such as those that involve mitogen-activated protein kinases, protein kinase C, or phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), can also activate Nrf2.[22]
  • “Activation of inflammatory pathway mediated through NF-kB by life-style-related factors such as tobacco, stress, dietary agents, obesity, alcohol, infectious agents, irradiation and environmental stimuli that account for as much as 95% of all cancers. Suppression of inflammatory pathway by lifestyle-related agents such as vegetables, fruits, legumes, grains, spices and exercise (such as Yoga), is indicated.”ICAM-1 (Inter-Cellular Adhesion Molecule 1) also known as CD54 (Cluster of Differentiation 54) MMPs(Matrix metalloproteinases )are zinc-dependent endopeptidases; other family members are adamalysins, serralysins, and astacins. The MMPs belong to a larger family of proteases known as the metzincinsuperfamily. Collectively they are capable of degrading all kinds of extracellular matrix proteins, but also can process a number of bioactive molecules. They are known to be involved in the cleavage of cell surface receptors, the release of apoptoticligands (such as the FAS ligand), and chemokine/cytokine in/activation.[2] MMPs are also thought to play a major role on cell behaviors such as cell proliferation, migration (adhesion/dispersion), differentiation, angiogenesis, apoptosis and host defense.iNOS (or NOS2 or Cytokine-Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase): Immune systems and cardiovascular system. Converts L-arginine to citrulline and Nitric OxideC-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR-4) also known as fusin or CD184 (cluster of differentiation 184)Drugs that block the CXCR4 receptor appear to be capable of "mobilizing" hematopoietic stem cells into the bloodstream as peripheral blood stem cells.Inflammation and cancer: how friendly is the relationship for cancer patients?Bharat B Aggarwal and PrashasnikaGehlotCurrent Opinion in Pharmacology 2009, 9:351–369
  • Transmigration of activated T-cells into the intima is mediated by adhesion molecules (ICAM-1; VCAM-1; ELAM-1) expressed on activated endothelial cells. Activation of various inflammatory pathways that lead to expression of gene products linked to cellular transformation, survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis of cancer.uPC: a protease or digestive enzyme that is made by the PC cell, stimulates PC cell and osteoblast growth, and is involved with invasion and metastasis of Prostate Cancer.Current Opinion in Pharmacology 2009, 9:351–369
  • Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 also known as STAT3 is essential for the differentiation of the TH17 helper T cells, which have been implicated in a variety of autoimmune diseases.LOX: LipoxygenaseIn mammals a number of lipoxygenasesisozymes are involved in the metabolism of eicosanoids (such as prostaglandins, leukotrienes and nonclassiceicosanoids)A model for the regulation of inflammatory biomarkers. Disease is normally because of dysregulation of numerous inflammatory biomarkers (represented by each bulb). Complete inhibition of a single biomarker (such as COX-2) is more likely to be toxic and unlikely to cure the disease.However, downregulation of several biomarkers is more likely to partially inhibit the dysregulated inflammation, being less toxic and more efficient in treating the disease. Current Opinion in Pharmacology 2009, 9:351–369
  • http://www.standup2cancer.org/node/3950http://www.ted.com/talks/william_li.html
  • http://www.ted.com/talks/william_li.htmlAngiogenesis out of control: Blinding diseases, Cancer, Psoriasis, Arthritis, AIDS-Kaposis Sarcoma, Rosacea, MS, Obesity, Alzheimer’s, Endometriosis
  • REFERENCES1. Murray RK, Granner DK, Mayes PA, et al. Harper’s Biochemistry. 24th ed. Stamford(CT): Appleton & Lange; 1996.2. Guyton AC. Textbook of Medical Physiology. 8th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders;1991.3. Bradlow HL, Telang NT, Sepkovic DW, et al. 2-Hydroxyestrone: the ‘good’ estrogen.J Endocrin 1996;150:S259-S65.4. Muti P, Bradlow HL, Micheli A, et al. Estrogen metabolism and risk of breast cancer: aprospective study of the 2:16α-hydroxyestrone ratio in premenopausal and postmenopausalwomen. Epidemiology 2000;11(6):635-40.5. Yager JD, Liehr JG. Molecular mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis. Annu RevPharmacolToxicol 1996;36:203-32.6. Westerlind KC, Gibson KJ, Malone P, et al. Differential effects of estrogen metaboliteson bone and reproductive tissues of ovarectomized rats. J Bone Miner Res 1998;13(6):1023-31.7. Bolton JL, Pisha E, Zhang F, et al. Role of quinoids in estrogen carcinogenesis. ChemRes Toxicol 1998;11:1113-27.8. Meilahn EN, De Stavola B, Allen DS, et al. Do urinary oestrogen metabolites predictbreast cancer? Guernsey III cohort follow-up. Br J Cancer 1998;78:1250-55.9. Fishman J, Osborne MP, Telang NT. The role of estrogen in mammary carcinogenesis.Ann N Y AcadSci 1995;768:91-100.10. Zhu BT, Conney AH. Is 2-methoxyestradiol an endogenous estrogen metabolite thatinhibits mammary carcinogenesis? Cancer Res 1998;58:2269-77.11. Butterworth M, Lau SS, Monks TJ. 17 β-estradiol metabolism by hamster hepaticmicrosomes. Implications for the catechol-O-methyl transferase-mediated detoxicationof catechol estrogens. Drug MetabDispos 1996;24(5):588-94.12. Yue TL, Wang X, Louden CS, et al. 2-Methoxyestradiol, an endogenous estrogenmetabolite, induces apoptosis in endothelial cells and inhibits angiogenesis: possiblerole for stress-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and Fas expression. MolPharmacol 1997;51(6):951-62.13. Fujisawa T, Mori M. Influence of bile salts on β-glucuronidase activity of intestinalbacteria. 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Nature of cytochromes P450 involved in the2-/4-hydroxylations of estradiol in human liver microsomes. BiochemPharmacol1992;44(9):1745-56.27. Galbraith RA, Michnovicz JJ. The effects of cimetidine on the oxidative metabolism ofestradiol. New Engl J Med 1989;321(5):269-74.28. Kaaks R. Nutrition, hormones, and breast cancer: Is insulin the missing link? CancerCauses Control 1996;7:605-25.29. Snedeker SM, Diaugustine RP. Hormonal and environmental factors affecting cell proliferationand neoplasia in the mammary gland. ProgClinBiol Res 1996;394:211-53.30. Fan S, Meng Q, Gao B, et al. Alcohol stimulates estrogen receptor signaling in humanbreast cancer cell lines. Cancer Res 2000;60(20):5635-39.31. Steingraber S. Living Downstream. Reading (MA): Addison-Wesley; 1997.32. Zand RS, Jenkins DJ, Diamandis EP. Steroid hormone activity of flavonoids andrelated compounds. Breast Cancer Res Treat 2000;62(1):35-49.33. Scambia G, Ranelletti FO, Benedetti Panici P, et al. Type-II estrogen binding sites in alymphoblastoid cell line and growth-inhibitory effect of estrogen, anti-estrogen andbioflavonoids. Int J Cancer 1990;46(6):1112-16.34. Basly JP, Marre-Fournier F, Le Bail JC, et al. Estrogenic/antiestrogenic and scavengingproperties of (E)- and (Z)-resveratrol. Life Sci 2000;66(9):769-77.35. www.ars-grin/duke.gov. Dr. Duke’s Phytochemical and Ethnobotanical Databases.November 2000.36. Shultz TD, Howie BJ. In vitro binding of steroid hormones by natural and purifiedfibers. Nutr Cancer 1986;8(2):141-47.37. Adlercreutz H. Western diet and Western diseases: some hormonal and biochemicalmechanisms and associations. Scand J Clin Lab Invest 1990:50(S201):3-23.38. Adlercreutz H, Hockerstedt K, Bannwart C, et al. Effect of dietary components,including lignans and phytoestrogens, on enterohepatic circulation and livermetabolites of estrogens and in sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). J SteroidBiochem 1987;27(4-6):1135-44.39. 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Pino AM, Valladares LE, Palma MA, et al. Dietary isoflavones affect sex hormonebindingglobulin levels in postmenopausal women. J ClinEndocrinolMetab 2000;85(8): 2797-2800.48. Wang C, Makela T, Hase T, et al. Lignans and flavonoids inhibit aromatase enzyme inhuman preadipocytes. J Steroid BiochemMolecBiol 1994;50:205-12.49. Xu X, Duncan AM, Merz BE, et al. Effects of soy isoflavones on estrogen andphytoestrogen metabolism in premenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol BiomarkersPrev 1998;7(12):1101-08.50. Xu X, Duncan AM, Wangen KE, et al. Soy consumption alters endogenous estrogenmetabolism in postmenopausal women. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2000;9(8):781-86.51. Barnard ND, Scialli AR, Hurlock D, et al. Diet and sex-hormone binding globulin,dysmenorrhea, and premenstrual symptoms. ObstetGynecol 2000;95(2):245-50.52. Messina MJ, Persky V, Setchell KD, et al. Soy intake and cancer risk: a review of the invitro and in vivo data. Nutr Cancer 1994;21:113-31.53. Barnes S, Peterson TG, Coward L. Rationale for the use of genistein-containing soymatrices in chemoprevention trials for breast and prostate cancer. J Cell BiochemSuppl 1995;22:181-87.54. Cassidy A, Bingham S, Setchell KD. Biological effects of a diet of soy protein rich inisoflavones on the menstrual cycle of premenopausal women. Am J ClinNutr 1994;60(3):333-40.55. Lu LJ, Anderson KE, Grady JJ, et al. Effects of soya consumption for one month onsteroid hormones in premenopausal women: implications for breast cancer riskreduction. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1996;5(1):63-70.56. Kirkman LM, Lampe JW, Campbell DR, et al. Urinary lignan and isoflavonoid excretionin men and women consuming vegetable and soy diets. Nutr Cancer 1995;24(1):1-12.57. Thompson LU, Robb P, Serraino M, et al. Mammalian lignan production from variousfoods. Nutr Cancer 1991;16(1):43-52.58. Adlercreutz H, Bannwart C, Wahala K, et al. Inhibition of human aromatase bymammalian lignans and isoflavonoidphytoestrogens. Steroid BiochemMolecBiol1993;44(2):147-53.59. Mousavi Y, Adlercreutz H. Enterolactone and estradiol inhibit each other’s proliferativeeffect on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in culture. J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol 1992;41(3-8):615-19.60. Phipps WR, Martini MC, Lampe JW, et al. Effect of flax seed ingestion on themenstrual cycle. J ClinEndocrinolMetab 1993;77(5):1215-19.61. London RS, Murphy L, Kitlowski KE, et al. Efficacy of alpha-tocopherol in thetreatment of the premenstrual syndrome. J Reprod Med 1987;32:400-04.62. Malafa MP, Neitzel LT. Vitamin E succinate promotes breast cancer tumor dormancy.J Surg Res 2000;93(1):163-70.63. Muneyvirci-Delale O, Nacharaju VL, Altura BM, et al. Sex steroid hormones modulateserum ionized magnesium and calcium levels throughout the menstrual cycle inwomen. FertilSteril 1998;69(5):958-62.64. Michnovicz JJ, Adlercreutz H, Bradlow HL. 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Curley RW, Humphries KA, Koolemans-Beynan A, et al. Activity of D-glucarate analogues:synergistic antiproliferative effects with retinoid in cultured human mammarytumor cells appear to specifically require the D-glucarate structure. Life Sci 1994;54(18);1299-303.77. Verma SP, Goldin BR, Lin PS. The inhibition of the estrogenic effects of pesticides andenvironmental chemicals by curcumin and isoflavonoids. Environ Health Perspect1998;106(12):807-12.78. Goud VK, Polasa K, Krishnaswamy K. Effect of turmeric on xenobioticmetabolisingenzymes. Plant Foods Hum Nutr 1993;44(1):87-92.79. Susan M, Rao MN. Induction of glutathione S-transferase activity by curcumin inmice. Arzneimittelforschung 1992;42(7):962-64.80. Maltzman TH, Christou M, Gould MN, et al. Effects of monoterpenoids on in vivoDMBA-DNA adduct formation and on phase I hepatic metabolizing enzymes.Carcinogenesis 1991;12:2081.81. Vigushin DM, Poon GK, Boddy A, et al. 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  • http://www.cabecahealth.com/media/sites/36/files/NutrInfluencesEstrogen.pdfMET451 1/01APPLIED NUTRITIONAL SCIENCE REPORTSCopyright © 2001 by Advanced Nutrition Publications, Inc.ReferencesBolton JL, Pisha E, Zhang F, et al. Role of quinoids in estrogen carcinogenesis. Chem Res Toxicol 1998;11:1113-27.Colditz GA. Relationship between estrogen levels, use of hormone replacement therapy, and breast cancer. J Natl Cancer Inst 1998;90(11):814-23.Thomas HV, Reeves GK, Key TJ. Endogenous estrogen and postmenopausal breast cancer: a quantitative review. Cancer Causes Control 1997;8(6):922-28.Rose PG. Endometrial carcinoma. New Eng J Med 1996;335(9):640-49. Hankinson SE, Willett WC, Manson JE, et al. Plasma sex steroid hormone levels and risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. J Natl Cancer Inst 1998;90(17):1292-99. Zanetta GM, Webb MJ, Li H, et al. Hyperestrogenism: A relevant risk factor for the development of cancer from endometriosis. GynecolOncol 2000 Oct;79(1):18-22.Kuiper GG, Lemmen JG, Carlsson B, et al. Interaction of estrogenic chemicals and phytoestrogens with estrogen receptor & beta. Endocrinology 1998;139(10):4252-63. Kaaks R. Nutrition, hormones, and breast cancer: Is insulin the missing link? Cancer Causes Control 1996;7:605-25. Snedeker SM, Diaugustine RP. Hormonal and environmental factors affecting cell proliferation and neoplasia in the mammary gland. ProgClinBiol Res 1996;394:211-53. Fan S, Meng Q, Gao B, et al. Alcohol stimulates estrogen receptor signaling in human breast cancer cell lines. Cancer Res 2000;60(20):5635-39. Steingraber S. Living Downstream. Reading (MA): Addison-Wesley; 1997:248-51.Murray RK, Granner DK, Mayes PA, et al. Harper’s Biochemistry. 24th ed. Stamford (CT): Appleton & Lange; 1996. Guyton AC. Textbook of Medical Physiology. 8th ed. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 1991. Bradlow HL, Telang NT, Sepkovic DW, et al. 2-Hydroxyestrone: the ‘good’ estrogen. J Endocrin 1996;150:S259-S65.Muti P, Bradlow HL, Micheli A, et al. Estrogen metabolism and risk of breast cancer: a prospective study of the 2:16-hydroxyestrone ratio in premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Epidemiology 2000;11(6):635-40. Yager JD, Liehr JG. Molecular mechanisms of estrogen carcinogenesis. Annu Rev PharmacolToxicol 1996;36:203-32. Westerlind KC, Gibson KJ, Malone P, et al. Differential effects of estrogen metabolites on bone and reproductive tissues of ovarectomized rats. J Bone Miner Res 1998;13(6):1023-31.Meilahn EN, De Stavola B, Allen DS, et al. Do urinary oestrogen metabolites predict breast cancer? Guernsey III cohort follow-up. Br J Cancer 1998;78:1250-55. Fishman J, Osborne MP, Telang NT. The role of estrogen in mammary carcinogenesis. Ann N Y AcadSci1995;768:91-100. Zhu BT, Conney AH. Is 2-methoxyestradiol an endogenous estrogen metabolite that inhibits mammary carcinogenesis? Cancer Res 1998;58:2269-77. Butterworth M, Lau SS, Monks TJ. 17-beta-estradiol metabolism by hamster hepatic microsomes. Implications for the catechol-O-methyl transferase-mediated detoxication of catechol estrogens. Drug MetabDispos 1996;24(5):588-94.Shultz TD, Howie BJ. In vitro binding of steroid hormones by natural and purified fibers. Nutr Cancer 1986;8(2):141-47. Adlercreutz H, Hockerstedt K, Bannwart C, et al. Effect of dietary components, including lignans and phytoestrogens, on enterohepatic circulation and liver metabolites of estrogens and in sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG). J Steroid Biochem1987;27(4-6):1135-44.Cassidy A. Potential tissue selectivity of dietary phytoestrogens and estrogens. CurrOpinLipidol 1999;10:47-52. Brzezinski A, Debi A. Phytoestrogens: the "natural" selective estrogen receptor modulators? Eur J ObstetGynecol 1999;85:47-51.Lissin LW, Cooke JP. Phytoestrogens and cardiovascular health. J Am CollCardiol 2000;35(6):1403-10.Knight DC, Eden JA. A review of the clinical effects of phytoestrogens. ObstetGynecol1996;87(5):897-904. Messina MJ, Persky V, Setchell KD, et al. Soy intake and cancer risk: a review of the in vitro and in vivo data. Nutr Cancer 1994;21:113-31.Kirkman LM, Lampe JW, Campbell DR, et al. Urinary lignan and isoflavonoid excretion in men and women consuming vegetable and soy diets. Nutr Cancer 1995;24(1):1-12.Thompson LU, Robb P, Serraino M, et al. Mammalian lignan production from various foods. Nutr Cancer 1991;16(1):43-52. London RS, Murphy L, Kitlowski KE, et al. Efficacy of alpha-tocopherol in the treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. J Reprod Med 1987;32:400-04.Muneyvirci-Delale O, Nacharaju VL, Altura BM, et al. Sex steroid hormones modulate serum ionized magnesium and calcium levels throughout the menstrual cycle in women. FertilSteril 1998;69(5):958-62.Michnovicz JJ, Adlercreutz H, Bradlow HL. Changes in levels of urinary estrogen metabolites after oral indole-3-carbinol  treatment in humans. J Natl Cancer Inst 1997;89(10):718-23.Tiwari RK, Guo L, Bradlow HL, et al. Selective responsiveness of human breast cancer cells to indole-3-carbinol, a chemopreventive agent. J Natl Cancer Inst 1994;86(2):126-31. Michnovicz JJ, Bradlow HL. Altered estrogen metabolism and excretion in humans following consumption of indole-3-carbinol. Nutr Cancer 1991;16(1):59-66. Yuan F, Chen DZ, Liu K, et al. Anti-estrogenic activities of indole-3-carbinol in cervical cells: implication for prevention of cervical cancer. Anticancer Res 1999;19(3A):1673-80.Tully DB, Allgood VE, Cidlowski JA. Modulation of steroid receptor-mediated gene expression by vitamin B6. FASEB J 1994;8(3):343-49.Minton JP, Walaszek Z, Schooley W, et al. Beta-glucuronidase levels in patients with fibrocystic breast disease. Breast Cancer Res Treat 1986;8:217-22.Walaszek Z, Szemraj J, Narog M, et al. Metabolism, uptake, and excretion of a D-glucaric acid salt and its potential use in cancer prevention. Cancer Detect Prev 1997;21(2):178-90.Goud VK, Polasa K, Krishnaswamy K. Effect of turmeric on xenobioticmetabolising enzymes. Plant Foods Hum Nutr 1993;44(1):87-92. Susan M, Rao MN. Induction of glutathione S-transferase activity by curcumin in mice. Arzneimittelforschung 1992;42(7):962-64. Jeong HJ, Shin YG, Kim IH, et al. Inhibition of aromatase activity by flavonoids. Arch Pharm Res 1999;22(3):309-12.Zhu BT, Loder DP, Cai MX, et al. Dietary administration of an extract from rosemary leaves enhances the liver microsomal metabolism of endogenous estrogens and decreases their uterotropic action in CD-1 mice. Carcinogenesis 1998;19(10):1821-27.Maltzman TH, Christou M, Gould MN, et al. Effects of monoterpenoids on in vivo DMBA-DNA adduct formation and on phase I hepatic metabolizing enzymes. Carcinogenesis 1991;12:2081.Vigushin DM, Poon GK, Boddy A, et al. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of D-limonene in patients with advanced cancer. Cancer ChemotherPharmacol 1998;42:111-17.
  • SIDE NOTE: Look at DOPAMINE QUINONE as a similar story. During AMPHETAMINE ABUSE, too much DA is secreted at dopaminergic terminals and the MAO and tyrosinase enzymes are overwhelmed. DA gets auto-oxidized to DA-Quinone and this ROS destroys stiatal/basal ganglia resulting in chorea-like (Huntington’s Chorea) movement disorders
  • Endocrine: Testosterone made in testis acting on the hear muscle, for exampleAutocrine: Estrogen made in the breast tissues that affect and acts on ERs in that same breast tissueParacrine: Breast tissue that aromatizes Estradiol to Testosterone where it acts on HRs in nearby breast tissue
  • Tongat Ali: In the sensitive area of erectile dysfunction and male virility, there are many options available to aid and assist in regaining strength, performance, and regularity of the male reproductive system.  One such assistance comes from the plant Tongkat Ali (Eurycomalongifolia).  Originating from Malaysia and areas of Southeast Asia, it has long been used as an aphrodisiac.  The Tongkatali tree can grow to up to about 36 feet in height.  All parts of the Tongkat Ali tree have been used to treat the male sex drive, while also acting as a tonic for general well-being.  Physical trainers and athletes have also been known to use Tongkatali to safely increase testosterone levels for increased muscle mass and definition.This testosterone-enhancing herb is used to build up male libido, as well as combating fatigue, and strengthens the muscle and blood circulation to ensure proper and enjoyable sexual activity. Tongkat Ali has been shown in studies to increase testosterone levels in males up to 93%.  In a study from the Reproductive Research Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, men between the ages of 31-52 regularly took Tongkat Ali.  Results indicated increased testosterone levels; thus improving libido, energy as well as muscle mass (Source: Excerpt from Molecular Biology of the Cell, September 1, 2002)  While there are many other benefits to this plant, the more popular use of this is to address sexual concerns. It stimulates sex drive, appears to thicken semen with increased sperm count, reduces incidences of premature ejaculation, and aids in maintaining erections. Tongkat Ali acts as a tonic, not only for the immune system and the muscular system, but the reproductive system as well. The most important part of the semen is the spermatozoa, as it is the male generative cell which fertilizes the female ovum, and this is what the Tongkat Ali tones and strengthens. The stimulating nature of this herb assists in carrying a normal amount of blood to all parts of the body, equalizing circulation or restoring imbalances of circulation.  An imbalance begins to occur in men from the age of 40 and onwards, when androgens (a steroid hormone) become deficient.  This hormone has specific effects on tissue growth and brain function.  The Tongkat Ali had been suggested to block the negative feedback to the pituitary gland and hypothalamus that initiates this deficiency, and essentially tricks the body into producing testosterone levels experienced by men in their 20s  (Source: Dr. James Stoxen, Ch. 39-a, Eureka Bioscience Collection, October 3, 2003).

Nutraceutical Adjunts To Bhrt Presentation Transcript

  • 1. NutraceuticalAdjunts to BHRT
    It’s never just about the hormones: Vitamins, Supplements, Herbs used in support of hormone health
    By
    Mark Burger, Pharm.D., RPh
    Health First! Pharmacy & Compounding Center
  • 2. Introduction
    … Compounding Pharmacists
  • 3. Objectives
    • Give compounding pharmacists some Evidence Based logic supporting the use of vitamins, nutraceuticals and herbs in augmenting BHRT;
    • 4. Discuss the hormone mimicry, homonogenics and general phytocrinology of plant substances;
    • 5. Discuss and demonstrate the physiology of PCOS, endometriosis, breast and (?) other cancers as related to estrogen metabolism;
    • 6. Discuss the individual nutraceuticals, their clinically effective dose ranges and commercial products that contain them
    • 7. Discuss the support of the thyroid gland with nutraceuticals and phytotherapy.
  • Consults and Testing
    • BHRT
    • 8. Supplement Reviews
    • 9. Medication Therapy Management
    • 10. Symptom Driven
    • 11. Saliva Testing for Hormones
    • 12. Nutrient Testing (Serum)
    • 13. Neurotransmitter (AM Urine)
    • 14. NeuroEndocrine (AM Urine/Saliva)
  • Genomics and Epigenomics
    • TIME Magazine, January 6, 2010: Why Your DNA ISN’T Your Destiny (cover story)
    • 15. WHAT WE DO TODAY AFFECTS THE NEXT GENERATION (Darwin was wrong, Lamarck was right)
  • Homunculi in sperm as drawn by N. Hartsoecker in 1695
    Lamarck, Darwin, Mendel
    (which one DON’T you know?)
    What Grandpa ate, affects how long the Grandkid lives [by as much as 32 years!]
  • 16. Nutritional & Functional Medicine Approaches to Hormone Balance
    • Obesity = ↑ Estrogen ↑ Insulin ↓ Leptin
    • 17. High-Protein = ↓ insulin +↑ glucagon (especially important in the AM when cortisol is naturally elevated)
    • 18. Upper GI Support: ↑ Acid = ↑ protein +↑methyl donors (Vitamin B’s & FA)+ ↑Fe/Mg/Zn absorp.
    • 19. Liver Support: ↑ Phase I & II metabolism -> effective elimination of estrogen metabolites
    • 20. Lower GI Support: Pre- & Probiotics, N-3 Fish Oils, Fiber (lignans)
  • Genomic & EpigenomicInfuences(remember: you CAN change this!)
    Low or Slow METHYLATORS (exacerbated by ↓ gastric acidity)
    High AROMATIZERS (driven by ↑ insulin)
    Nrf2 (NF-E2-Related Factor 2: transcription factor)
    ↑ production of SOD and glutathione
    ↓ production of NF-kappa B & other pro-inflammatory factors
    In Norrbotten, if you were born during the abundant years, your kids might live 32 fewer years!
  • 21.
  • 22.
  • 23. How Do Nutraceuticals Compare?
    Drugs
    Nutraceuticals
    Celecoxib
  • 24. “For a long time, doctors thought that testosterone, the male sex hormone, fueled the growth of some prostate tumors, he says. Prostate cancer treatment, therefore, has focused on blocking testosterone. But more recently, "we began to realize that estrogen is involved as well.””“But by a year later, 25% of men taking Acapodene had developed prostate cancer compared with 31% of those on a placebo. "For every 100 men with PIN treated with the drug for a year, [nearly seven cancers] are prevented," Price says.” By Charlene  Laino WebMD Feature Reviewed Below
  • 25. “Conclusions: In men undergoing RP BMI was associated with adverse pathological featuresand a greater risk of biochemical progression.”FREEDLAND, STEPHEN J. Et al. OBESITY AND RISK OF BIOCHEMICAL PROGRESSION FOLLOWING RADICAL PROSTATECTOMY AT A TERTIARY CARE REFERRAL CENTER. Journal of Urology. 174(3):919-922, September 2005. BELOW
    http://www.wmfurology.com/pca.htm
  • 26. Conclusion: The percentage of obese men undergoingRP in our data set doubled in the last 10 years. Obesity wasassociated with higher-grade tumors, a trend toward increasedrisk of positive surgical margins, and higher biochemical failurerates among men treated with RP. A BMI 35 kg/m2 was associatedwith a higher risk of failure than a BMI between 30 and 35 kg/m2.Journal of Clinical Oncology, 10.1200/JCO.2004.04.181Received April 28, 2003Accepted November 10, 2003
    “First my nads shrink, then my willy won’t work, now my prostate is whacked. I have got to lose some weight!”
  • 27. “The wooly mammoths are getting harder and hard to find.”
    “The diet known as calorie restriction (CR) is the most reproducible way to extend the lifespan of mammals. Many of the early hypotheses to explain this effect were based on it being a passive alteration in metabolism. Yet, recent data from yeast, worms, flies, and mammals support the idea that CR is not simply a passive effect but an active, highly conserved stress response that evolved early in life's history to increase an organism's chance of surviving adversity.”Sinclair DA. Toward a unified theory of caloric restriction and longevity regulation. Mech Ageing Dev. 2005 May 10; PMID: 15893363 PubMed Below
    http://images.art.com/images/PRODUCTS/
    large/10087000/10087743.jpg
  • 28. Liver Support
    Diet,
    Exercise,
    Stress Mgmt.
    Product Information Below
    Liver Tonic
    Lipotropic Factors
    Detox Medical Food
    Detox Buffer
    Vitamins A, C, D, E, Thiamin, B6, B2, Niacin, L-5-methyltetrahydrofolate, B12 to support Phase I and Phase II liver detoxification
    Nutrients involved in fat metabolism, including inositol, choline, and taurine, methyl donors, folic acid, vitamins B6 &B12, and select herbs that are traditionally used to support bile flow & healthy liver fxn.
    15 Gm N2, 160 Kcal, 19 Gm CHO, 3 Gm Fat + catechins + B vites + A, D, E, C, Biotin + AAs for liver detox
    Milk Thistle Extract 70 mg [standardized to 80% silymarin (56 mg)]
    to supports healthy liver function and helps protect liver tissue
    1 TID
    2 with meals
    2 scoops 1 – 4+ / day
    3 with UC
  • 29. “DALLAS - March 3, 2005 - Cholesterol, often stigmatized for its role in heart disease, has long been known to be essential for the health of the fat-laden membranes that surround individual cells.”“Through an interaction with a protein called the oxysterol binding protein (OSBP), cholesterol holds together a group of enzymes that deactivates extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK). Overactive ERK is associated with multiple cancers.”Researchers discover a good side to cholesterol in controlling cell signals http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/utsw/cda/dept37389/files/210108.html Media Contact: MeghaSatyanarayana214-648-3404e-mail: megha.saty@utsouthwestern.eduARTICLE BELOW
    Cholesterol prevents cancer.
    Statin Sales
    "Cell signals have to be tightly controlled," said Dr. Richard G.W. Anderson, chairman of cell biology and senior author of the study. "If the signaling machines do not work, which can happen when the cell doesn't have enough cholesterol, the cell gets the wrong information, and disease results."
  • 30. FIGURE 2. Hypothetical scheme showing potential mechanisms whereby n–6 (promote) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and n–3 (suppress) PUFAs may promote and suppress carcinogenesis, respectively.
    Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Jun;79(6):935-45. PMID: 15159222
  • 31. “GLA exerts selective toxic effects on cancer cells without affecting normal cells.”
    http://www.northwestern.edu/newscenter/stories/2005/11/gammalinolenic.html Below
    Therefore, ourresults raisethe possibility that GLA-induced transcriptional repressionof the Her-2/neuoncogene may represent a molecular approachto treat Her-2/neu–overexpressing carcinomas, i.e., incombination with trastuzumab. Although extensive preclinicaland clinical studies are necessary before GLA can enter clinicaltrials, our findings suggest that future studies assessing theclinical relevance of GLA-regulated Her-2/neu promoter activityare warranted.J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Nov 2;97(21):1611-5. PMID: 16264182 Below
    Picture:http://www.esew.org/warning_lists/plants/plants5.htm
  • 32. Omega 3 Oils & Cancer Prevention1. Reduce inflammation2. Reduce angiogenesis3. Decrease Oncogenes4. Induce differentiation5. Suppress NFKB6. Suppress bcl-2 (apoptosis blocker)7. Reduce cachexia
    3
    Pro -Cancer
    Article
    Below
    Anti -Cancer
    1,5
    4
    EPA/DHA
    Virus / Inflammation
    6
    7
    NFKB
    COX-2
    2
    Cancer
    Supply
    Line
  • 33. Pleo + Poly
    Morphic
    The Ultimate Detox
    Complete Protein
    - Methionine
    - Cysteine
    MCT’s (energy)
    Fiber (transit time)
    Energy Nutrients
    - B1, B2, B3, B5, Mg
    Phase II conjugates
    - NAC, (GSH synthesis)
    - Sodium Sulfate,
    - Amino Acids
    Methylation Support
    - 5MTHF, B12, B6
    - Methionine, Choline
    Bi-functional modulators
    - Ellagic Acid, (pomegranate)
    - Catechins, (green tea)
    - Watercress (PEITC)
    Additional Support
    - Silymarin (SOD)
    - Artichoke (anti oxidant)
    - Vitamins, minerals,
    - additional anti oxidants
    Genetic
    Nutritioneering
    8
    Big
    Functional Medicine
  • 34. Pancreatic Enzymes
    5 TID away from food
    Omega 3’s
    4 to 10 + / day
    Activated Omega 6
    2 BID
    Plant Nutrients
    1 Scoop QD
    Any borage seed oil, an essential fatty acid that is converted in the body to DGLA (dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid), the direct precursor of beneficial series 1 prostaglandins
    Protease  104,000 USP, Amylase  104,000 USP
    Lipase  16,640 USP
    Per 1 tablet
    300 mg EPA + 200 mg DHA per Softgel
    Any Green Food
    Multi No Iron
    2 BID
    Immune Support
    15 drops QID
    Detox + Buffer
    Vitamins A, C, D, E, Thiamin, B6, B2, Niacin, L-5-methyltetrahydrofolate, B12 to support Phase I and Phase II liver detoxification
    Any good, absorbable, professional-line multivitamin
    15 Gm N2, 160 Kcal, 19 Gm CHO, 3 Gm Fat + catechins+ B vites + A, D, E, C, Biotin + AAs for liver detox (conjugation)
    Extracts from live mycelial and fruiting stages of specially cultivated mushroom strains
    Product info Below
    2 scoops BID to TID
    3 BID to TID
  • 35. Estrogen Metabolism1.Diet, Exercise, Stress Management – FLT2. Increase Brassica Family (2-OH)3. Support for Liver (glucoronidation, sulfation, methylation)4. Support for Bowel Clearance4. Antioxidant Support
  • 36. Estrogens, whether you make them, whether you take them . . .whether you have been unknowingly, intoxicated by them. . .Whether you are a man or a woman . . .You need to get rid of them every day . . . IN A HEALTHY WAY!!!!
  • 37. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the hypothesis thatbreast cancer can be initiated by estrogen exposureand thatestrogen metabolizing genes are involved inthis mechanism. Chin Med J (Engl). 2005 Sep 20;118(18):1507-16. PMID: 16232327 Below
    Estrogen Metabolism is important.
  • 38. Hey, why do you cells continue to proliferate?
    “We believe it would represent a serious error in judgment with regard to public health to ignore the clear message from these combined studies published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and the Journal of the American Medical Association that estrogen/progestin therapy increases the risk to breast cancer.”Kuller LH. Effect. Effect of hormone replacement therapy on breast cancer risk: estrogen versus estrogen plus progestin. J Natl Cancer Inst. 92(4):328-332.
    I’m just following orders. Estrogen says divide, I divide.
  • 39. obesity has been linked to leptin resistance”Nat Clin Pract Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2005 Jun;2(6):273-80. PMID: 16265231
    CONCLUSIONSAdipocytokines were shown to participate to some extent in the process of carcinogenesis, …”“It is well documented that obesity increases the risk of some types of cancer such as that ofcolon, breast and prostate.” Leptin, the most widely studied member of a family, stimulatesgrowth, migration and invasion of cancer cellsin vitro and also potentiates angiogenesis, thushaving the capacity of promoting malignant biological behavior of cancer in vitro.Physiol Res. 2005 Oct 17; PMID: 16238454 Below + article below
    “Leptin, the most widely studied member of a family, stimulatesgrowth, migration and invasion of cancer cells” “also potentiates angiogenesis”Physiol Res. 2005 Oct 17; PMID: 16238454 Below + article below
    Leptin (from fat)
    is a
    Pro-carcinogen
    http://www.svimr.unimelb.edu.au/price1.htm
  • 40. Ana M. Soto, M.D.
    The increasing risk of breast cancer and other cancers has paralleled the proliferation of synthetic chemicalssince World War II.An estimated 85,000 synthetic chemicals are registered in the United States, yettoxicological screening data are available for only 7 percent of these chemicals. http://tuftsjournal.tufts.edu/archive/2003/february/oped/index.shtml Below
    “85,000 synthetic chemicals are registered”
    7% are screenable.
    7% is approximately 1 in 14
    200 chemicals found in newborns
    Theoretically could be 2800.
  • 41. http://www.health.library.mcgill.ca/osler/archives/index.htm
    "One of the first duties of the physician (pharmacist?) is to educate the masses not to take medicine."William OslerThe Principles and Practice of Medicine (1892)http://goanimal.com/newsletters/2005/big_pharma/big_pharma.html
    William Osler
    http://mcgovern.library.tmc.edu/OslersWeb/OP1/FP0000aB.htm
  • 42.
  • 43. Can We Eat to Starve Cancer?: William Li, MD
    • Turmeric Soy
    • 44. Vitamin E Artichoke
    • 45. Selenium Vitamin D3
    • 46. Tea
    • 47. Green Tea
    • 48. Lavender
    • 49. Brassica
    • 50. Grapes
    • 51. Garlic
    http://www.ted.com/talks/william_li.html
  • 52. Not Enough
    Too Much
    “16% decrease in fertility for each unit increase of BMI”
    Ferlitsch K, et al. Body mass index, follicle-stimulating hormone and their predictive value in in vitro fertilization. J Assist Reprod Genet. 2004 Dec;21(12):431-6. PMID: 15704518 BELOW
  • 53. “Cortisol is regenerated from cortisone by 11ß-hydroxysteroiddehydrogenase type 1 (11HSD1), amplifying glucocorticoid actionin adipose tissueand liver. (11)HSD1 inhibitors are being developedfor type 2 diabetes and may be most effective inobesity, whereadipose 11HSD1 is increased.”Diabetes. 2005 May;54(5):1364-70. PMID: 15855321 Below with article
    FIG. 1. Metabolism of d4-cortisol to form d3-cortisone and d3-cortisol. D, deuterium = 2H.
    “Life was not as stressful when I was thin.”
    Adipose magnifies cortisol
  • 54. Progesterone to Estrogen Ratio
    “Before menopause, progesterone-to-estrogen ratios vary from about 20:1 to about 170:1, at different phases of the menstrual cycle. For a pregnancy to occur, an ideal ratio of 30:1 or possibly 60:1 may be needed. . . A low progesterone-to estrogen ratio, such as 10:1, can result in infertility in pre-menopausal women and abnormal uterine bleeding in women of menopausal age.”
    “These birth control pills work great. I have not had a cycle in 6 years.”
    Bland, New Approaches to Anti-Aging: 2001, page 71
  • 55. MENOPAUSE
  • 56. How will dysglycemiaaffect your body?
    • Fatty Liver
    • 57. Heart Attack
    • 58. Stroke
    • 59. Neuropathy
    • 60. Hypertension
    • 61. Dementia
    • 62. Depression
    • 63. Retinopathy
    • 64. Obesity
    • 65. inflammation
    • 66. Infertility
    • 67. Gout
    • 68. Sexual Dysfunction
    “Insulin resistance, per se, seems to be necessary for the components of Syndrome X to develop, but it is not sufficient. In order to understand the pathophysiology of Syndrome X,it must be realized that not all tissues respond similarly to insulin within the same individual. For example, although the ability of insulin to stimulate glucose uptake by muscle and inhibit adipose tissue lipolysis is highly correlated within an individual, insulin resistance at the level of the muscle and adipocyte does not mean that insulin action on the kidney is impaired.”Reaven, Gerald M. SYNDROME X INSULIN RESISTANCE, HYPERINSULINEMIA, AND CORONARY HEART DISEASEChapter 28 - April 1, 2002,http://www.endotext.org/diabetes/diabetes9/diabetes9.htmARTICLE BELOW
  • 69. “In a 1981 landmark report, Doll and Peto, 1 estimated that35% of US cancer deaths were attributable to dietary factors.”“Although recent findings on fruit and vegetable consumption and cancer may be disappointing, reductions in blood pressure and epidemiological evidence for lower risks of cardiovascular disease provide sufficient reason to consume these foods in abundance.”Willett, W. Diet and Cancer An Evolving Picture JAMA. 2005;293:233-234.ARTICLE BELOW
    1/3 + of cancers are related to poor diet.
  • 70. Stress
    Adipose
    Toxins
    Insomnia
    The Oxidative Seven
    Lack of Anabolic Hormones
    Talk
    Impaired Cellular Communication
    February 23, 2004
    Poor Diet
  • 71. “ . . .oxidation of the carcinogenic 4-hydroxy catechol estrogens(CE) of estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2) to catechol estrogen-3,4-quinones(CE-3, 4-Q) results in electrophilic intermediates that covalentlybind to DNA to form depurinating adducts. The resultant apurinicsites in critical genes can generate mutations that may initiatevarious human cancers.”
    4-OH estrogens increase cancer risk.
    Cavalieri,E.L. et al.; Molecular origin of cancer: Catechol estrogen-3,4-quinones as endogenous tumor initiators Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA Vol. 94, pp. 10937-10942, September 1997
  • 72. Nutritional Influences on Estrogen Metabolismhttp://www.cabecahealth.com/media/sites/36/files/NutrInfluencesEstrogen.pdf
    { The Bad
    { The Good
    { The Ugly
  • 73. Table 1. Sources of Estrogens
  • 74. “Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that mimics theaction of the human hormone estrogen,can leachfrom polycarbonate plastic.3 Human exposure to BPAis widespread. A Centers for Disease Control study detectedBPA in the urine of 95 percent of adults sampled.4Scientists have measured BPA in the blood of pregnantwomen, in umbilical cord blood and in the placenta, all atlevels demonstrated in animals to alter development.5,6”SOURCE BELOW: http://www.environmentalobservatory.org/library.cfm?refid=77083
    Xenoestrogens
    BPA
    95% penetrance
  • 75. Table 2. Mechanisms through which dietary and nutritional factors may influence estrogen metabolism
  • 76. Nutrients to Promote 2-methoxy estrogens
    Flax Lignans, Kudzu, Soy, I3C (also Aromatase Inhibitors)
    Folic Acid, 5-Formyl THF, TMG/DMG, Choline, BetaineHCl, B6, B12 (methyl donors)
    Magnesium (co-factor for COMT)
    “The effects of 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME)-induced apoptosis was examined in human leukemia cells(U937 and Jurkat) in relation to mitochondrial injury, oxidative damage, and perturbations in signaling pathways. 2ME induced apoptosis in these cells in a dose-dependent manner”Gao N. et al. 2-Methoxyestradiol-induced apoptosis in human leukemia cells proceeds through a reactive oxygen species and Akt-dependent process Oncogene (2005) 24, 3797−3809.ABSTRACT BELOW
    2-Methoxyestrogens kill Leukemia cells.
  • 77. Prescriptions Filled
    ZITHROMAX 39,535,047
    AMOXICILLIN 35,768,145
    75,303,192
    2004 Estimated US Cancer Deaths*
    Women272,810
    “Among 2266 women with breast cancer, as compared with 7953 controls, the use of antibiotics was more common; the risk of breast cancer was greater with longer duration of antibiotic use and was consistent across antibiotic classes. This observation is potentially worrisome in that antibiotic exposure is common and sometimes nonessential.”Roberta B. Ness, MD, MPH; Jane A. Cauley, DrPH,Antibiotics and Breast Cancer—What's the Meaning of This? JAMA Vol. 291 No. 7, February 18, 2004ARTICLE BELOW
    • 25% Lung & bronchus
    • 78. 15% Breast
    • 79. 10% Colon & rectum
    • 80. 6% Ovary
    • 81. 6% Pancreas
    • 82. 4% Leukemia
    • 83. 3% Non-Hodgkin lymphoma
    • 84. 3% Uterine corpus
    • 85. 2% Multiple myeloma
    • 86. 2% Brain/ONS
    • 87. 24% All other sites
    Antibiotics are associated with increased breast cancer.
    ONS=Other nervous system.
    Source: American Cancer Society, 2004.
  • 88. Breast Cancer
    Conditions causally related to obesity.
    arthritis,
    breast cancer,
    heart disease,
    colorectal cancer,
    type 2 diabetes,
    endometrial cancer,
    end-stage renal disease,
    gallbladder disease,
    hypertension,
    liver disease,
    low back pain,
    renal cell cancer,
    obstructive sleep apnea,
    stroke and
    urinary incontinence.
    Sexual Dysfunction *
    Infertility *
    Fatigue *
    Depression
    http://www.obesity.org/treatment/cost.shtml Below
    ETIOLOGY
    genetic, endocrine and exogenous factors (28).
    http://www.kbsplit.hr/rakdojke/breastcancer.htmBelow
  • 89. The Ugly: 3,4-quinones of E2 and E1
    Use of CEE (Premarin or PremPro) promotes
    Presence of BENZENE RING (critical to effect on DNA) [NOTE: also dopamine!]
    2-double bonded OXYGENS at the 3 & 4 positions
    Formation of DNA Adducts (Adenine & Guanine)
    Leaves a –OH (hydroxyl) “stub” on DNA
    May be responsible for MANY cancers
    See work of ErcoleCavalieri, et al Univ Neb.
  • 90. Anti-Oxidant Influences
    Vitamins A, E, C, D3, Selenium
    Curcumin (turmeric)
    Grean Tea (polyphenols like EGCG)
    Flavonoids
    Flavonols: myricetin & quercetin
    Flavones: apigenin & luteolin
    Flavanones: herperidin & naringenin
    Flavan-3-ols: catechin, epicatechin, epicatechingallate, epigallocatechin, & EGCG
    Anthocyanidins: cyanidin, pelargonidin (Umcka)
  • 91. Anti-Oxidant Influences (cont.)
    Scutellariabarbata extract
    Astragalus root extract
    N-acetylcysteine (-> glutathione-S-transferase ->GSH mercapturates)
    Resveratrol
    Iodine
    Methyl-donors (B6, B12, 5-MTF, Di- & Tri-methyl glycine aka betaineHCl (Phase II)
    Calcium D-glucarate (Phase II)
  • 92. Anti-Oxidant Influences (cont.)
    Mushrooms (esp. Coriolus & Reishi)
    Lycopene5 mg PO QD
    Vitamin D3 (at levels 50-80 ng/mL)
    Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) [↓ insulin’s ↑ effect on aromatase]
    Magnesium [necessary co-factor for COMT]
  • 93. PhytocrineInfuences
    Four types of Hormones
    Endo-crine (from some other place in body)
    Auto-crine (from the same place/cell)
    Para-crine (from an adjacent cell)
    Phyto-crine (from a plant outside the body)
    3 main mechanisms of action (for AGONISTIC action)
    Functional Mimetic (doesn’t sit on hormone receptor)
    Improved hormone production (phytohormonogenic)
    Direct binding to HR (phytohormone)
    Phyto-estrogen (flax, soy, hops, sesame oil, tofu, etc.)
    Phyto-progestins (diosgenin)
    Phyto-androgens (pine pollen extract)
  • 94. PhytocrineInfuences (cont.)
    Phyto-Anti-Hormones (antagonists)
    Saw Palmetto (serenoarepens) 320 mg QD
    Holy Basil (ocimum sanctum) aka Tulsi2 caps QD
    Nettle root (urticadioca) 300 mg/day
    Fenugreek (trigonellafoenum-graecum)
    Sweet fennel (foeniculumvulgare) [beta-sitosterol]
    Pygeum (africanum) [beta-sitosterol] 100 mg/day
    Sea buckthorn oil [highest beta-sitosterol content at 1650 mg/100mL]
  • 95. PhytocrineInfuences on Thyroid
    • Sea Kelp (iodine source)
    • 96. Bladderwrack (iodine source+anti-estrogen)
    • 97. Hops (enhances uptake of iodine & suppresses NF-Kappa B ->↓TNFa & ↓IL-6
    • 98. Coleus forskolii (mimics TSH ↑Na-I-symporter or NIS, promotes secretion of T3 & T4)
    • 99. L-Tyrosine (source of thryoxine backbone)
    • 100. Ashwaganda (↑ production of thryoidhorm.)
    • 101. Bacopamoniera (↑ T4 with ->T3)
  • PhytocrineInfuences on Thyroid(continued)
    • Anything that reduces inflammation (↓NF-kappa B) will improve 5’-deiodinase and therefore ↓ rT3 formation!
    • 102. Guggul, Rosemary oil, Sage, Hops, Coleus and Asragalus all do this to some extent
    • 103. They also increase the expression of the RXR receptors (retinoid-X-receptors) where thyroid receptors (TR) couple with RXR to form a heterodimer that is thought to be the principle mediator of target gene regulation on target cells by the T3 hormone! (↓BPA)
  • Dosing of Nutraceutical and Products
    Betaine HCL (BPP by Thorne) 2-6 w/meal
    Detox Factors (ITI) or LiverMax (Adv Naturals)
    Ultra-Clear (MG); Medi-Clear (Thorne) or Clear DeTox (PE) [medical foods] BID meal
    R-Plus NAC (Geronova Research) [R-LA + NAC]
    Meta Lipoate 300 (Metagenics) 1 cap PO BID
    Resvoxitrol (OrthoMolec) 1 cap PO BID w/food
    Resveratrol Plus (PE) 1 cap BID w/food
    Nrf2 Activator (Xymogen) [brocc, turm, green tea, bioperine, pterostilbenes] 1 cap QD to BID w/f
  • 104. Dosing of Nutraceutical and Products (cont.)
    Breast Defend (ecoNugenics): DIM, coriolus, reishi, turmeric, scutellaria, quercetin, astragalus1-4 caps PO BID w/food
    Cell Guardian (Natura): NAC, DIM, CDG, B6, B12, FA, Se, broccoli, cabbage, wasabi & pomegranate 3 caps QD to BID
    CDG EstroDIM (OrthoMolecular): DIM + Calcium d-glucarate + I3C 2 caps QD w/food
    DIMension 3 (Xymogen): Turmeric + DIM + Bioperine2 caps QD to BID w/food
  • 105. Dosing of Nutraceutical and Products (cont.)
    LifeShield Immunity (New Chapter): 18 mushrooms 1 cap BID anytime
    Reishi (New Chapter) 2 caps QD anytime
    Coriolus-MRL (Mycology Research Labs) 2 to 6 tablets PO QD
    Alapars (niacin + NAC) 1 tablet PO TID
    Clinical Nutrients for Diabetics (ITI) 2 tabs PO w/each meal
    Methyl-SP (Apex) [B6, B12, FA, Mg, choline, TMG, MSM, beet root, betaineHCl] 2 caps TID
  • 106. Dosing of Nutraceutical and Products (cont.)
    • Prostate Optimizer (Jarrow) [D3, SP, Lyco, N3, Milk thistle, Nettle, Lignans, Grean tea, Broccoli]
    1 sofgel PO TID w/food
    • Testo-Gain (Douglas Labs) [2.25 grams of an herbal blend of ashwag, damiana, mucuna, etc.]
    3 caps PO QD w/food
    • ITI Man (ITI) [maca, yohimbine, rhodiola, horny goat weed, ginseng, tongatali]1 cap BID
    • 107. Maca-3 (PE) [macamides, macaenes, tuber]
    1 cap BID anytime (AM & mid-afternoon)
  • 108. “Obese men are 30% more likely to experience erectile problemsthan those of normal weight.”Lewis RW.  Can weight loss improve the erectile function of obese men? Nature Clinical Practice Urology (2004) 1, 68-69 ARTICLE BELOW
    “Another effective strategy for prolonging the lifespan is caloric restriction: in data presented here, the persistence of estrogen-sensitive cells in the hypothalamus of caloric restricted 22-month-old female mice,may explain the persistence of reproductive function at an age, when reproductive function has long ceased in ad libitum fed controls.”Timiras PS et al. The ageing phenome: caloric restriction and hormones promote neural cell survival, growth, and de-differentiation Mechanisms of Ageing and Development Volume 126, Issue 1 , January 2005, Pages 3-9 ABSTRACT BELOW
  • 109. Dysglycemia Medical Food
    Dysglycemia Support tabs
    Dysglycemia Support
    Alpha Lipoic Acid, Cinnamon,
    L-carnosine, Taurine, B-vites, Chromium, Zinc, Biotin, Selenium, EGCG, Vanadium, Etc.
    Containing:
    15 Gm N2, 175 kcal, chromium, biotin, cinnamon, etc.
    Diet,
    Exercise,
    Stress Mgmt
    Exercise & Diabetes are virtually incompatible
    2 BID
    2 scoops 1 to 5x / day
    Herbal Glucose Support
    Neuropathy
    support
    Islet Cell Support
    PPAR support
    Niacinamide 500 mg,
    N-acetylcysteine 200 mg. to inhibit PARS, free radical generation, cytokines, and collagenase.
    Conjugated Linoleic Acid 1 Gm. + Rosemary Leaf 40 mg. tosupport healthy glucose and insulin metabolism through its activation of PPAR alpha and PPAR gamma—potent insulin sensitizers.
    Alpha Lipoid Acid 200 mg/2 tabs to support the health and function of neurological tissue, especially peripheral nerves. Crosses the blood-brain barrier.
    Fenugreek Seed 6.5:1 Extract 1,000 mg; Bitter Gourd 10:1 Ext. 152 mg; Gymnema Leaf 10:1 Ext. 100 mg
    1 or 2 BID PC
    600 mg / day
    1 or 2 TID
    1 or 2 TID
  • 110. Maybe I should consider natural medicine!
    “OBJECTIVE: Physicians’ suicide rates have repeatedly been reported to be higher than those of the general population or other academics,”“RESULTS: The aggregate suicide rate ratio for male physicians, compared to the general population, was 1.41, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.21–1.65. For female physicians the ratio was 2.27”Schernhammer, ES et al. Suicide Rates Among Physicians: A Quantitative and Gender Assessment (Meta-Analysis), Am J Psychiatry 161:2295-2302, December 2004 PMID: 15569903 Below
  • 111. Be a Badger
    Aggressiveness, Reliance, Self-Expression
    The power of the Badger totem is its aggressivenessand the willingness to fight for what it wants.This aggression can also be turned to healing –
    for Badger is the keeper  of Earth's healing herbs. 
    Badger people are quick to express their feelings with concern for the consequences.  They are often healers who have the courage to use unconventional methods.Badger has the ability to persist to find a cure.
    Badger people are often leaders and bosses, the one who will get the job done.
    If you have a Badger as a totem, you will likely be solitarybut comfortable being alone.You are comfortable within yourself and very self-reliant.
    Badger anger can get you out of apathy,but be careful not to cut yourself (or others) to ribbons using.Badger is a powerful totem when used properly.
  • 112. Thank you!