Current Research on Games for Managing Chronic Conditions, Lieberman, 6-13-2012
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Current Research on Games for Managing Chronic Conditions, Lieberman, 6-13-2012

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Presentation by Debra Lieberman at the 2012 Games for Health Conference

Presentation by Debra Lieberman at the 2012 Games for Health Conference

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    Current Research on Games for Managing Chronic Conditions, Lieberman, 6-13-2012 Current Research on Games for Managing Chronic Conditions, Lieberman, 6-13-2012 Presentation Transcript

    • Current Research on Games for Managing Chronic ConditionsPresentation to the Games for Health Conference Boston, MA Debra Lieberman, Erica Biely, Ramsey Nijem, & Marta Delcor UC Santa Barbara June 13, 2012
    • We found games & research on thesechronic conditions Diabetes  Crohn’s disease Asthma  HIV / AIDS Kidney disease  Multiple sclerosis Malaria  Heart Disease Hepatitis  Cancer Tuberculosis  STDs, STIs Sickle cell disease  Autism Hypertension  Depression Arthritis  Alzheimer’s Cystic fibrosis
    • Some patterns / similarities emerged Can we boil most self-management games down to just a few game designs? Likewise, is the research limited to a few repeating study designs and research questions? So, I ask you to provide counter-examples:  Where are examples of innovation?  What are your ideas for innovation? Here are the patterns we found in today’s games:
    • 5 chronic condition game “genres” or formats1. Knowledge games2. Self-management skill games3. Simulation games4. Nurturing games5. Goal setting and social support games (not discussed today; used mostly for fitness and prevention, but there is great potential for disease self-management)Some games are hybrids of two or more genres
    • Characters1. No characters (puzzles, card games)2. Fantasy characters3. Realistic characters4. Self character (avatar)5. Helper character / tutor / doctor / sage6. Co-learner character that models the joy of discovery7. Role model characters (positive, negative, transitional)8. Enemies that cause illnessSome characters have the chronic condition, some do not
    • Settings1. No setting (puzzles, card games)2. Fantasy worlds3. Real world4. Inside the human body
    • Intended outcomes1. Knowledge gain; deeper understanding2. Skill development and rehearsal  Health decision-making  Self-care  What to do in social situations3. Changes in attitudes, risk perceptions, empathy, self-concepts – all can lead to behavior change4. Social support – instrumental and emotional5. Motivation for health behavior change in real life
    • Repurposed off-the-shelf commercial gamescould be used for chronic conditions Aerobic fitness and weight loss Dance games, Wii Fit, Kinect games Mental acuity, attention, memory Scrabble, Sudoku, Tetris, Dakim, Brain Age Physical therapy and rehabilitation Wii balance board, Kinect motion sensor Phobia reduction Auto racing games to address fear of driving
    • Theory integrated into the game design For example, Extended Parallel Process Model (Witte) Game presents a threat message  Players feel threat of the chronic condition:  Perceived severity, susceptibility Game instills efficacy through rehearsal of self- management  Players see the efficacy of the recommended response as they rehearse that response  Self-efficacy, response efficacy
    • R2 = .03 Perceived susceptibility .18* .35*** R2 = .15 ). Perceived severity R2 = .19 Playingthe health game Improved behaviors .20** .35*** and health outcomes R2 = .05 Self efficacy for self-management behaviors .17** -.11** .28*** R2 = .08 Response efficacy of self-management behaviors
    • Here are examples of games formanagement of chronic conditions The Diabetic Dog (diabetes) Re-Mission (cancer) Bronkie the Bronchiasaurus (asthma) Heart Sense (heart disease)
    • The Diabetic Dog
    • The Diabetic Dog Nurturing of a “patient” character Simulation of chronic disease self-management Underlying multivariate algorithm of actions and effects Make health decisions and see the consequences The nurtured character’s health outcomes (good outcomes are needed to win the game) are based on the player’s health decisions in the game
    • Bronkie the Bronchiasaurus
    • Bronkie the Bronchiasaurus Role playing adventure game Fantasy characters Set in the real world (real consequences of good or bad asthma self-management) Nurturing of one’s own character The character’s health outcomes (good outcomes are needed to win the game) are based on the player’s health decisions in the game
    • Re-Mission  Produced by HopeLab, Palo Alto, CA  For teens and young adults who have cancer  To improve cancer knowledge, adherence, sel f-care
    • Re-Mission Role playing adventure game Fantasy characters Set in the human body Nurturing of characters The nurtured character’s health outcomes (good outcomes are needed to win the game) are based on the player’s health decisions in the game
    • Heart Sense
    • Heart Sense “Role playing game in which you help the hero try to solve a crime and simultaneously rescue his career and find romance. However, as the hero, some of the many characters you might get clues from, need your help to deal with heart attacks before they or others can help you. Since, for their own reasons, they often dont believe they are having a heart attack or dont want to take care of it promptly, there are significant obstacles to helping these characters help themselves. And if you prefer to harm these characters, you are free to do so, but watch out, your own future will be affected as well!”
    • Heart Sense Role playing adventure game Realistic characters Set in the real world Nurturing of characters The nurtured character’s health outcomes (good outcomes are needed to win the game) are based on the player’s health decisions in the game
    • Research examples Re-Mission, Bronkie Randomized controlled trials(no slides, just speaker’s description)
    •  Do you recommend any disease self-management games with different formats and behavior change strategies? Innovative ideas for designing disease self-management games?
    • Thank you! Debra Lieberman, Erica Biely, Ramsey Nijem, Marta Delcor Health Games Research UC Santa Barbara www.healthgamesresearch.orgDatabase: www.healthgamesresearch.org/db