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Five Keys to Getting your Job Done Inside your Company
 

Five Keys to Getting your Job Done Inside your Company

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Whatever perspective is ultimately seen as the most helpful, there seem to be some tangible things companies can do to improve the chances of success....

Whatever perspective is ultimately seen as the most helpful, there seem to be some tangible things companies can do to improve the chances of success.
Experts at many Consultant Companies agree that, like everything else in business management, improving execution is an ongoing process.
However, they say there are steps any company can take that should provide some incremental gains.
We have prepared a presentation to discuss this subject and share some new ideas.
We hope that you enjoy it!

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    Five Keys to Getting your Job Done Inside your Company Five Keys to Getting your Job Done Inside your Company Presentation Transcript

    • Five Keys to Getting the Job Done Inside Your Company
    • Introduction
      • Whatever perspective is ultimately seen as the most helpful, there seem to be some tangible things companies can do to improve the chances of success.
    • Introduction
      • Experts at many Consultant Companies agree that, like everything else in business management, improving execution is an ongoing process.
      • However, they say there are steps any company can take that should provide some incremental gains.
    • Develop a Model for Execution
      • It is important for managers to "have a model [identifying] the critical variables that define -- at least for the manager -- the things they have to worry about when they put together an implementation plan.
    • Develop a Model for Execution
      • Without that, managers will say something like, 'We just hand the ball off to someone and let them run with it,' and that's the execution plan. That isn't going to go anywhere."
    • Choose the Right Metrics
      • While sales and market share are always going to be the dominant metrics of business, We could say that more and more of the best companies are choosing metrics that help them evaluate not only their financial performance, but whether a plan is succeeding.
    • Choose the Right Metrics
      • But we need to warn that it's important to choose metrics in a package so that they can change if market conditions change.
    • Don't Forget the Plan
      • Plans are often simply agreed to and then forgotten.
      • One way advocated by some consultants to keep the plan on center stage is to separate executive meetings about operations from those focused on strategy.
    • Don't Forget the Plan
      • Most of times day-to-day concerns often so overwhelm the executive team that such an agenda management process is the only way to keep executive attention focused on the organization's progress.
    • Assess Performance Frequently
      • One of the reason why some companies are so good at execution is they know daily if what it is doing in each of their branches/stores get results or not.
    • Assess Performance Frequently
      • They are able to mitigate the damage in a way they wouldn't have if results had been slower in coming.
      • By shortening the performance monitoring cycle -- from quarter-by-quarter to month-by-month or week-by-week -- top management can get more "real-time" feedback on the quality of execution down the line.
    • Communication
      • We can say that companies often go wrong by creating a cultural distinction between the executives who design a strategy and people lower down in the corporate hierarchy who carry it out.
      • Asking ongoing questions about the status of a plan is a good way to ensure that it will continue to be a priority.
    • Lico Reis Consultoria & Línguas Roberto Lico Reis Feel free to send us suggestions about new presentations, that can help you to face your life or professional challenges. www.licoreis.com [email_address] E-books: www.migre.me/oQ5 Linkedin: www.migre.me/1d9r Twitter: @licoreis