Websitecriteria

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Websitecriteria

  1. 1. E V A L U A T I O N O F WE B S I T E S WEBSITE CRITERIA
  2. 2. SITE SUFFIX • Government site? • www.whitehouse.gov www.state.gov • Organizational? • http://www.peta.org/ www.occupywallst.o rg • A dotcom site? • www.disney.com www.microsoft.com
  3. 3. URL SUFFIX AND WEBSITE PURPOSE • What does the URL says about the purpose of the web site? • .edu = academic, colleges/universities: Examples: www.ucla.edu www.harvard.edu www.csulb.edu www.calstate.edu • .gov = U.S. government produced: Examples: www.whitehouse.gov www.ca.gov www.usda.gov www.ed.gov
  4. 4. Org sites are usually organizational sites for charities, non-profit organizations and sometimes political advocacy groups: • .org = organization, usually charitable, religious or a lobbying group: Examples: www.peta.org www.occupywallst.org http://englishfirst.org/d/ http://www.rootsofchange.org/ • .com = business/marketing, e-commerce • Other URLs • .mil = military site .net = network
  5. 5. WEBSITE CRITERIA • Objectivity • Advocacy [.org and organizational sites] • Emotional appeals • Factual/Neutral • Government • educational • Authority • Authorship • Sponsor/organization • Appropriateness/revelance • Is the website relevant to your topic • Currency • Updated regularly • Presents updated perspective on topic
  6. 6. OBJECTIVITY? Animal Rights • Organizations present specific perspectives on issues they represent • Language Use [emotional versus factual]
  7. 7. ADVOCACY SITE Food Movement
  8. 8. EMOTIONAL APPEAL • Advocacy sites often have emotional appeal through weighted language Examples of emotional appeal and weighted language from www.peta.org
  9. 9. ADVOCACY WITHOUT STRONG EMOTIONAL APPEAL Or, sometimes they do not! You must still evaluate the information on advocacy websites carefully
  10. 10. BIASED PERSPECTIVE [EVEN IF YOU AGREE WITH CAUSE]
  11. 11. GOVERNMENT SITE [WILL PROBABLY CONTAINS STATISTICS AND FACTS] USDA federal government website
  12. 12. HOW TO FIND OUT ABOUT A WEBSITE Go to About Us. Also try Home page
  13. 13. AUTHORITY [UNIQUE TO WEB – CELEBRITIES AND CAUSES] Celebrity endorsement
  14. 14. ROLE OF CELEBRITY [ANOTHER LAYER OF EVALUATION YOU MUST CONSIDER]
  15. 15. MAY BE ADVOCACY BUT NOT .ORG Alternative news source .com suffix still presents advocacy perspective
  16. 16. AUTHORITY IS OFTEN MORE DEFINED IN PUBLISHED SOURCES Writer • Editor • Board Audience Writer Audience Published Sources Web Resources: • Website author • Website Publisher • Or it can be -- No one!
  17. 17. VALUE OF ADVOCACY WEBSITES Reasons to use advocacy websites: • Questions existing information [even factual] • Presents alternative perspectives on topics • Examines conflicting/opposing viewpoints on topics
  18. 18. EXAMPLES • Cigarette smoking: although an issue before websites, 20 years ago official government sources supported smoking as a non harmful, or neutral activity [supported by cigarette manufacturers] • Food safety/GMOs: although government websites maintain the safety of GMOs, independent websites may question this stance CorporationsGovernment Public Where advocacy meets conflicting motives
  19. 19. ACADEMIC/NONACADEMIC? Sources for scholarly information include govt and educational websites:
  20. 20. ACCURACY Is this information found and verified in other sources?
  21. 21. APPROPRIATENESS, RELEVANCY • How relevant is the information to your topic? • How would you use www.occupywallst.org in a research paper? • How does this compare to other sources of verified information: books, reference sources, reports
  22. 22. CURRENCY Look at bottom for date. This usually indicates last updated version of site.
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