Introduction to Open Access
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Introduction to Open Access

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Introduction to Open Access Introduction to Open Access Presentation Transcript

  • Open Access Introduction • Rafia Mirza • Digital Humanities Librarian • Clarke Iakovakis • Data & eScience Librarian • Kristine Witkowski • Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Specialist 3/5/2014 1
  • Outline • • • • • • • University Presses Traditional (or Conventional) Publishing Serials & Monographs issues Gold and Green OA Institutional Repositories OA and the Humanities MLA & OA Image via Open access Week http://www.openaccessweek.org/p age/englishhigh-resolution-1 3/5/2014 2
  • University Presses Image via Duncan Hull http://www.flickr.com/photos/dullhunk/3962470782/ 3/5/2014 3 View slide
  • What is traditional or conventional publishing? • In conventional academic publishing, the author signs away their copyright to the publisher Image via Steve Snodgrass http://flic.kr/p/9mjRKW 3/5/2014 4 View slide
  • What is traditional or conventional publishing? • When you sign away your copyright, you need to get permission from the publisher o to put your article on reserve, o to publish derivative works o to post it on academic sites like academia.edu Image via Mike Seyfang http://flic.kr/p/5AXf6j 3/5/2014 5
  • Image via ARL Statistics 2010-11 3/5/2014 6
  • Serials Crisis Profit margins chart By Maura A. Smale 3/5/2014 7
  • Serials Crisis Monograph Crisis 3/5/2014 8
  • Monograph Crisis • The Future of Scholarly Publishing o “Library budgets for monographs in the humanities have declined steadily, in relative and sometimes in absolute terms, leading to proportional reductions in the number of scholarly books sold.” o “Subsidies for university presses have also declined as operational costs have risen, often placing the publishers under great pressure to make profit-based decisions. “ o “Even as they face growing economic problems, university presses are receiving ever more submissions as a result of increased expectations for promotion and tenure in our disciplines and at our institutions of higher learning.” Text via Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of Scholarly Publishing http://www.mla.org/resources/documents/issues_scholarly_pub/repview_future_pub 3/5/2014 9
  • What is OA? • “Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.” P. Suber Image via Duncan Hill http://flic.kr/p/ePZaCf 3/5/2014 10
  • What is OA? Image via opensourceway.com http://flic.kr/p/8Ut2uQ 3/5/2014 11
  • Creative Commons Image via Jan Slangen http://flic.kr/p/9vXrpm 3/5/2014 12
  • Gold • Gold OA o is delivered by journals o is Publisher OA Image via Open Access Week http://www.openaccessweek.org/p age/englishhigh-resolution-1 3/5/2014 13
  • Green • “There are other models that societies can and should explore, including the “green” road provided by institutional repositories and other kinds of scholarly archives.” o Openness, value, and scholarly societies: The Modern Language Association model by Kathleen Fitzpatrick Green OA image via Mitchell N Charity http://www.clarifyscience.info/part/About 3/5/2014 14
  • Research Commons(IR) • Our ResearchCommons is an Institutional Repository o complies with Open Archives Initiative (OAI) Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (PMH) • Which means they are interoperable and deposits are indexed by Google Scholar, Bing, Yahoo, etc. 3/5/2014 15
  • OA and the Humanities • Do Open Access Theses & Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences & Humanities? (College & Research Libraries, PDF, p.376) • MLA Office of Scholarly Communication • [MLA] The Future of Scholarly Publishing, From the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of Scholarly Publishing Footer Text 3/5/2014 16
  • OA and MLA • MLA Journals Adopt New Open-Access-Friendly Author Agreements o 6/5/2012, PMLA, Profession, and the ADE and ADFL bulletins. • Scholarly Communication @ MLA • Beyond the PDF: Experiments in Open-Access Scholar Footer Text 3/5/2014 17
  • OA Journal: ABO • ABO: Interactive Journal for Women in the Arts, 1640-1830 (ISSN 2157-7129) is an open access, interactive, scholarly journal, launched in 2011 by the Aphra Behn Society. • MLA Roundtable Presentation on Open Access: Editing Online Scholarly Journals Footer Text 3/5/2014 18
  • Suggested Readings • Open Access By Peter Suber • The Future of Scholarly Publishing From the Ad Hoc Committee on the Future of Scholarly Publishing • MLA Resources on Publishing and Scholarship • Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy by Kathleen Fitzpatrick, Director of Scholarly Communication at the Modern Language Association Footer Text 3/5/2014 19
  • http://libguides.uta.edu/scholcomm LOC, East Corridor 3/5/2014 20
  • Presenters • Rafia Mirza • Digital Humanities Librarian • rafia@uta.edu • Clarke Iakovakis • Data & eScience Librarian • clarke@uta.edu • Kristine Witkowski • Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Specialist • kwitkowski@uta.edu This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 Unported License. 3/5/2014 21