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Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
Workscitedinresearch
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Workscitedinresearch

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  • 1.  Citing your resources is important because- 1. It tells the reader where you found your information. 2. It shows respect for the work of the author/authors. 3. It enables the reader to use and/or validate the resource if they need to. 4. Not citing the source is plagiarism which if a form of dishonesty which can get you into a lot of legal trouble.
  • 2. Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. Title. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright date.Note the punctuation marks and format for citing work by a single author.Example:Smith, John. Space: The Greatest Expanse in the Universe. New York: Harper Collins, 2003.
  • 3.  First Author’s Last Name, First Author’s first Name, and Second Author’s Full Name. Title. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright date. Note punctuation marks in citation. Example:Smith, John H. and Mary L. Lamb. Space: The Greatest Expanse in the Universe. New York: Harper Collins, 2003.
  • 4.  Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Article Title.” Name of Encyclopedia. Edition Year. Note punctuation marks in citing of encyclopedias. Example: Smith, John. “Space.” World Book Encyclopedia. 2000 ed.
  • 5.  Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Article Title.” Magazine title. Issue Date: page number(s) of article. Note punctuation in citation. Example:Smith, John. “Local School Helps Students Write Better Papers.” Austin American Statesman. 15 October. 2001: D12.
  • 6.  Author (if known). “Title of Article.” Title of complete work. (if given-underlined). Date of visit <full http address>. (be sure enclosed in angle brackets.) Pay attention to punctuation in citing. Example: “Biographical Data: Walter M. Schirra.” Astronaut Biographies. 10 Jan. 2006 http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/s chirra-wm.html>.
  • 7.  If there are more than three authors or editors, list only the first one followed by et al (this means others). Sources are always cited alphabetically. Remember: The Works Cited document only lists the sources you actually used in your research paper; whereas, a Bibliography lists ALL of the sources that you researched.
  • 8.  Using your template for “Compiling Information for Works Cited” go to the library and find your sources. Be sure to provide all of the proper information. After gathering the required sources create your Works Cited page (handwritten or typed). Submit Works Cited page for lesson evaluation purposes.

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