Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     1 

Running head:  VISUAL VS. VERBAL TROPES 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                    Vis...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     2 

                                                                        Table of Contents...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     3 

                                           Table of Contents:  Figures and Appendices 

 ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     4 

Figure 3‐3: Recall of key points............................................................
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     5 

                                           Abstract 

Using visual tropes to convey ad me...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     6 

         One glance through the 2007 One Show award gallery reveals a collection of print...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     7 

       Ogilvy’s fondness for words may stem from his own experience as a copywriter, but ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     8 

visual puzzle for readers to figure out, rather than “telegraphing” the message in words ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     9 

or ideas and use uncommon and unexpected methods to tell a story about them.  Rhetoric 

...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     10 

deciphered.  Many psychologists have agreed that visual metaphors must first be mentally...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     11 

concrete verbal metaphors.  This study, however, did not directly contrast recall or att...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     12 

       However, further research that directly compares consumer interpretation of visua...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     13 

provable claims because they lack equivalent structure and inarguable meaning.  Because ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     14 

instantly, rather than requiring consumers to take the time of physically reading a head...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     15 

and goals from the world of creative awards shows, and that creative awards do not alway...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     16 

tropes.  After five days, participants took an online survey in which they answered 

qu...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     17 

cause your cigarettes to burn from both ends.  The copy for this ad is stylized fit the ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     18 

group of participants, contained the Tabasco and Orbit ads that used verbal tropes.  Eac...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     19 

Analysis 

       The survey first measured unaided recall of both brands by asking “Whi...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     20 

when they were prompted about the ad.  This measurement helps answer the question of 

c...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     21 

detail that conveyed the ad’s message that Tabasco sauce is hot.  Unaccepted answers 

i...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     22 

       These statements were designed to measure how attention‐grabbing they perceived 
...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     23 

                                                when supplied with the brand name.  Just...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     24 

       An analysis of the content of these open‐ended questions shows that even in the a...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     25 

only one result to be statistically significant:  the difference in the ability for the ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     26 

38% responses; for visual trope, a 4 with 38%.  The range of responses for both types of...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     27 

message was easy to understand, as they did a 5, meaning that they slightly disagreed.  ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     28 

However, the range of responses was much smaller at 2‐5.  Sixty‐two percent of 

respond...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     29 

visual trope is blurred and placed in the background, whereas in the ad with verbal trop...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     30 

brighter, and more surprising than the smoldering “wrong end” of the cigarette in the 

...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     31 

more often with for the ad the visual tropes than the verbal tropes.  This suggests that...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     32 

comprehended better.  This theory supports the idea that visual tropes might ask the 

r...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     33 

response pool would not be diminished by participants who had forgotten or ignored the 
...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     34 

than those who just read a headline.  Advertisers must understand that their consumers 
...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     35 

                                              References 

Effie Awards.  (2007, Novembe...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     36 

Morgan, S. E. & Reichert, T.  (1999). “The Message Is in the Metaphor:  Assessing the 

...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     37 

Shaw, S.  (2008, May 1).  Personal interview. 

Smith, R. A.  (1991).  “The Effects of V...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     38 

        Appendix 1:  Sample Ads 

           Figure 1‐1:  Lego ad 

       2007 One Show...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     39 

Figure 2‐1:  Tabasco ad with visual trope 
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     40 

Figure 2‐2:  Tabasco ad with verbal trope 
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     41 

Figure 2‐3:  Orbit ad with visual trope 
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     42 

Figure 2‐4:  Orbit ad with verbal trope 
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     43 

Figure 2‐5:  Article with visual tropes inserted
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     44 

Figure 2‐6:  Article with verbal tropes inserted 
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     45 

           Appendix 2:  Results 

        Figure 3‐1:  Unaided recall 

     

 

 

 
 ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     46 

          Figure 3‐3:  Recall of key points 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Figure 3‐4:  C...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     47 

                          Figure 3‐5:  “This ad grabbed my attention” 

 




          ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     48 

                     Figure 3‐6:  “This ad was easy to understand” 

                   ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     49 

                           Figure 3‐7:  “I liked this ad” 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    ...
Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     50 

   Special Thanks 

           

Shirley Nelson Garner 

  Jennifer Johnson 

   Erin La...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Summa Cum Laude Thesis

1,742 views
1,648 views

Published on

Visual Tropes vs. Verbal Tropes in Advertising. Libby Issendorf's Summa Cum Laude thesis at the University of Minnesota, 2008. Unpublished.

See the accompanying presentation here: http://www.slideshare.net/libbyjuju/summa-cum-laude-thesis

Published in: Business, Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,742
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
10
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Summa Cum Laude Thesis

  1. 1. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     1  Running head:  VISUAL VS. VERBAL TROPES                          Visual Tropes vs. Verbal Tropes in Advertising  Libby Issendorf  University of Minnesota  Summa Cum Laude Thesis
  2. 2. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     2  Table of Contents  Abstract......................................................................................................................................................................... 5  Introduction................................................................................................................................................................ 6  Existing Reseach ....................................................................................................................................................... 7  Current Industry Trend .......................................................................................................................................12  Research Question .................................................................................................................................................15  Methods – Procedures..........................................................................................................................................16                    – Analysis................................................................................................................................................19  Results.........................................................................................................................................................................22  Discussion and Analysis ......................................................................................................................................28  Suggestions for Future Research.....................................................................................................................32  Conclusion .................................................................................................................................................................33  References .................................................................................................................................................................35  Appendix 1:  Sample Ads.....................................................................................................................................38  Appendix 2:  Results..............................................................................................................................................45  Special Thanks .........................................................................................................................................................50   
  3. 3. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     3  Table of Contents:  Figures and Appendices  In‐Text Figures  Figure 3‐1: Unaided recall ..................................................................................................................................22  Figure 3‐2: Aided recall .......................................................................................................................................23  Figure 3‐3: Recall of key points........................................................................................................................23  Figure 3‐4: Comprehension of main message............................................................................................24  Figure 3‐5: “This ad grabbed my attention” ...............................................................................................25  Figure 3‐6: “This ad was easy to understand” ...........................................................................................26  Figure 3‐7: “I liked this ad”.................................................................................................................................27    Appendix 1:  Sample Ads  Figure 1‐1: Lego ad ................................................................................................................................................38  Figure 2‐1: Tabasco ad with visual trope.....................................................................................................39  Figure 2‐2: Tabasco ad with verbal trope....................................................................................................40  Figure 2‐3: Orbit ad with visual trope...........................................................................................................41  Figure 2‐4: Orbit ad with verbal trope ..........................................................................................................42  Figure 2‐5: Article with visual trope ads inserted ...................................................................................43  Figure 2‐6: Article with verbal trope ads inserted...................................................................................44    Appendix 2:  Results  Figure 3‐1: Unaided recall ..................................................................................................................................45  Figure 3‐2: Aided recall .......................................................................................................................................45 
  4. 4. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     4  Figure 3‐3: Recall of key points........................................................................................................................46  Figure 3‐4: Comprehension of main message............................................................................................46  Figure 3‐5: “This ad grabbed my attention” ...............................................................................................47  Figure 3‐5b:  Tabasco Attention T‐test results..........................................................................................47  Figure 3‐5c:  Orbit Attention T‐test results.................................................................................................47  Figure 3‐6: “This ad was easy to understand” ...........................................................................................48  Figure 3‐6b:  Tabasco Comprehension T‐test results.............................................................................48  Figure 3‐6c:  Orbit Comprehension T‐test results ...................................................................................48  Figure 3‐7: “I liked this ad”.................................................................................................................................49  Figure 3‐7b:  Tabasco Attitude T‐test results.............................................................................................49  Figure 3‐7c:  Orbit Attitude T‐test results ...................................................................................................49 
  5. 5. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     5  Abstract  Using visual tropes to convey ad messages has become a trend in creative advertising  awards shows.  This study compares the effects of visual and verbal tropes in advertising  on audience memory, comprehension, and attitude.  For two different brands, the same  trope was depicted in both words and images.  The verbal tropes were remembered more  frequently than the visual tropes; however, the main message was comprehended more  accurately in the visual tropes.  The theoretical explanations and implications of the  findings of this study are further discussed. 
  6. 6. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     6  One glance through the 2007 One Show award gallery reveals a collection of print  ads that are almost exclusively visual.  In the categories of consumer magazine, consumer  newspaper, small space print, and outdoor, none of the recipients of the Gold award have  more than five words of copy.  Across the board of award shows and client reels, copy‐free  print ads with an emphasis on powerful art direction over clever copy have become the  trend.  Jennifer Johnson (2007), former creative director at Leo Burnett, believes that  “people don’t really read anymore.  You need to be able to show them something that they  can just get, without having to work too hard at the copy.”  In a society where people are  exposed to thousands of ads per day, advertisers need ways to break through the media  clutter and catch consumers’ attention with a message that is both intriguing and easy to  understand.  An emphasis on visuals to relay that message appears to be their current  solution.  Contradicting the idea that visuals always communicate better than copy is a man  sometimes called the father of modern advertising, David Ogilvy (1973, 1985).  In two of  his books, he maintains that advertising should be upfront and to the point about product  benefits and defends copy as the most effective way for ads to express these messages.  He  says:  • Your headline should telegraph what you want to say (1985, p. 74).  • The wickedest of all sins is to run an advertisement without a headline (1973, p.  133).  • All my experience says that for a great many products, long copy sells more than  short (1985, p. 84). 
  7. 7. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     7  Ogilvy’s fondness for words may stem from his own experience as a copywriter, but  his long, successful career testifies to the validity of his opinions.  On visuals, he explains,  “The kind of photographs which work hardest are those which arouse the reader’s  curiosity.  He glances at the photograph and says to himself, ‘What goes on here?’” (1973 p.  144).  But Ogilvy maintains that to discover the meaning of the photograph, “[the  consumer] reads your copy to find out.”  For him, even with strong visuals, copy is an  essential part of an advertisement.  The Effie Awards, sponsored by the American Marketing Association, reward ads  based solely on how effectively the campaign has met its goals, such as increased  awareness, brand equity, or sales.  Advertisements that won Effies in 2007 are almost  exclusively based in words rather than images.   For example, the winner of the world’s  most effective marketing campaign in 2007 was Apple’s “Get a Mac” campaign, which  featured 14‐page magazine inserts that used hundreds of words to describe product and  brand benefits.  Images of Apple computers and iPods accompany the text, but the ad truly  relies on its copy to communicate its message (http://www.effie.org, 2007).  To further complicate the debate of whether visuals work better than words, award‐ winning One Show ads do not merely show a picture of the product being advertised.   Instead, many use visual tropes that communicate specific product benefits with creative,  unique visuals.  For example, a Lego ad shows an image of a train depot that is completely  empty except for a pile of green Lego bricks on the tracks.  The only copy occurs in tiny  print in the bottom right corner and reads “Build it,” alongside the Lego logo  (See Figure 1‐ 1 in the Appendix).  Ads like these inherently invite reader engagement by presenting a 
  8. 8. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     8  visual puzzle for readers to figure out, rather than “telegraphing” the message in words as  Ogilvy recommends.  But by making the message less straightforward, advertisers risk  burying the benefits of their products in these visuals and demanding more mental  involvement than consumers care to give.   Has the sophistication of consumers risen far enough from Ogilvy’s glory days that  visuals are no longer too much mental work for them to decipher?  Or are awards shows  and advertising organizations so eager to reward fresh, thought‐provoking images that  they are neglecting to measure ad effectiveness?  Have advertisers learned how to create  visual tropes that engage their consumers without making them work too hard for  comprehension, or should they stick with clear copy to convey their messages?  EXISTING RESEARCH  To begin answering these questions, researchers have conducted several studies to  examine the role of visuals in persuasive communication.  Images have always been an  important part of advertisements, but recently advertisers have begun relying on them to  convey more important elements of their messages (Phillips 2003).  Messaris (1997) notes  that while persuasive communication has been studied for hundreds of years, the focus of  that research has always been on verbal communication.  There is still ample room for  further investigation into the world of visual persuasion, specifically forms of visual  rhetoric.  Rhetorical figures, also called figures of speech, can be defined as “artful deviations  in the form taken by a statement” (McQuarrie and Mick 1996).  In other words, rhetorical  figures use novel or unexpected ways to convey their message.  They take ordinary objects 
  9. 9. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     9  or ideas and use uncommon and unexpected methods to tell a story about them.  Rhetoric  can be divided into two types:  schemes (which utilize excess regularity like repetition) and  tropes (which utilize irregularity).  Tropes are considered the more complex of these two  types, as they often use words outside their literal sense to create new, unexpected  meaning and comparisons between two ideas.  Tropes are incomplete and require the  audience to engage with them to make sense of the words or images in context of the ad.   For example, a metaphor is a type of trope that suggests that one object or concept is or is  like an unrelated object or concept.  “The lake was as smooth as glass” is a metaphor.   Another type of trope is hyperbole, which uses obvious and intentional exaggeration to  convey its message.  “We had to wait an eternity” is a hyperbole (McQuarrie and Mick  1996).  In both of these examples, the reader understands that the metaphor is not literal.   He or she does not think that the lake is actually made up of glass or that the wait actually  lasted forever.  But the reader understands the dramatic comparison that highlights the  similarities between the objects compared: that the lake is incredibly smooth in the same  way that a pane of glass is incredibly smooth, or that the wait lasted an extremely long time  in the same way that an eternity is an extremely long time.  McQuarrie and Mick (1999) point out that most existing studies that deal with visual  rhetoric in persuasive communication have been limited to examining metaphor.  Other  tropes like hyperbole, pun, or irony lack sufficient research to determine their effects on  the consumer, especially in contrast to verbal tropes of the same types.  The question of how consumers process tropes in advertising is itself confusing.   Current research provides conflicting information as to how exactly metaphors are 
  10. 10. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     10  deciphered.  Many psychologists have agreed that visual metaphors must first be mentally  translated into words before they can be decoded (Phillips 2003).   Logically, then, a verbal  metaphor would be comprehended more quickly and with less mental effort than a visual  one, since the consumer would not have to go through the additional mental process of  translating pictures to words.  But specifically within the discipline of advertising, little scholarly research has been  done to indicate whether visual or verbal metaphors are more effective (Morgan and  Reichert 1999).  Some research has indicated that visual metaphors might be recalled more  frequently.  Kaplan (1992) cites studies in the field of psychology that have shown visual  metaphors to be remembered more easily than verbal metaphors.  However, this research  did not specifically measure the effects of metaphors in advertising.  Whittock (1990) believes that advertisers make metaphors easier to understand  when they use visuals to convey their messages.  He argues that when consumers interpret  verbal metaphors, they create mental images to accompany the ideas expressed in words  as they decode the metaphor.  By using images to illustrate the comparison presented in  verbal metaphors, advertisers shorten the decoding process by supplying the consumer  with that image already.  Lester (2002) agrees that visuals aid recall because people tend to  remember things visually or spatially rather than verbally.  Morgan and Reichert (1999) performed a study that compared visual and verbal  metaphors in advertising.  The purpose of their study was to compare right‐ and left‐brain  use in decoding metaphors, but they also found that their subjects understood the  meanings of the advertisements more accurately when visuals were present to illustrate 
  11. 11. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     11  concrete verbal metaphors.  This study, however, did not directly contrast recall or attitude  toward verbal and visual metaphors.  It also included both a visual and verbal  representation of the same metaphor in many of the sample ads for the study.  At the time,  this was realistic; many ads in the marketplace contained both a visual and a headline to  communicate the same idea.  However, as stated earlier, copy‐free advertising is becoming  more popular and comprising the majority of award‐winning advertising at creative shows.  McQuarrie and Mick (2002) discovered that when reading magazines, consumers  paid more attention to ads with visual tropes.  In another study, they found that ads with  visual tropes not only gained more attention from consumers, but were also liked better  than those without (1999).  In this study, however, they were comparing ads that contained  visual tropes to those that contained visuals without tropes.  For example, an ad for a  motion sickness remedy depicted the package for the sickness as a seat belt buckle in a car.   The modified ad adds a buckle to the seat belt and moves the package slightly farther back  in the seat, removing the visual metaphor.  It could be argued that the real finding for this  study is that ads with tropes are more effective than ads without them.  Aside from the limited findings they have gleaned from these studies, advertising  researchers have assumed that visual and verbal metaphors have equal effects on  consumers.  This assumption is validated by researchers who have found that metaphor  occurs at the level of thought rather than at the level of language and images and that the  specific form the metaphor takes has little to do with how it is understood (Forceville  1996; Hitchon 1997).  Smith (1991) determined that advertising messages are interpreted  similarly, whether they are based in images or words. 
  12. 12. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     12  However, further research that directly compares consumer interpretation of visual  and verbal tropes is necessary (Phillips 2003).  Both studies by McQuarrie and Mick (1999,  2002) and the study by Morgan and Reichert (1999) compared ads for different brands and  products with different features benefits.  Most importantly the ads they compared used  different metaphors to communicate their messages.  This raises the question of validity in  comparing advertisements with potentially different target audiences, creative strategies,  and messages.  It is possible that the advertisements featuring visual metaphors had  advertised brands that were more well‐liked or well‐known than those in the ads with  verbal metaphors, or vice versa. It is also possible that one specific message measured was  more memorable or easier to understand.  Because of these inconsistencies, further  research is needed to directly compare visual and verbal tropes.  The same message for the  same product must be presented purely in text and purely with visuals.    CURRENT INDUSTRY TREND    Before further research can be conducted to examine the effectiveness of visual  versus verbal tropes, the current industry trends toward visual tropes must be examined.      One potential explanation for an industry trend that emphasizes visuals rather than  text points to the reason many consumers mistrust and dislike advertising:  the potential  for deception.  Using images to convey meaning in advertisements serves a greater purpose  than aesthetic attractiveness; it also has a legal advantage for the advertiser.  Messaris  (1997) and McQuarrie and Mick (1999) state that visual devices do not have an established  syntax the way that verbal devices do.  Unlike words with concrete definitions—one  product is better than another or one action caused a result—visuals do not make explicit, 
  13. 13. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     13  provable claims because they lack equivalent structure and inarguable meaning.  Because  visuals are open to more interpretations than text, they have the ability to mislead  consumers.  Advertisers have more flexibility to make outrageous or false product claims  that could be firmly refuted if expressed in text by arguing that their target is  misunderstanding their visual claims.    Many ad professionals think visuals resonate more with consumers and are easier  to understand than verbal messages.  In the book Creative Advertising:  Ideas and  Techniques from the World’s Best Campaigns, Mario Pricken argues early on that “stories  can be told in an effective way without using words” (2002).  He devotes most of his book  to advertisements that tell stories with visual elements, encouraging budding copywriters  to think visually rather than verbally, so that consumers understand advertising messages  “at a glance.”  According to Pricken, visual tropes require the least amount of work for  consumers to comprehend.    Professionals within the ad industry have other theories about the trend toward  images.  Sarah Shaw, retired copywriter from three major Twin Cities agencies, believes  that whether an ad is anchored in text or in visuals, it needs to first and foremost be  relevant to the consumer before it will gain any attention.   Then it needs to communicate  as much information as possible at first glance.  “The people who are really interested will  read the body copy, but 80% of people will skip it” (2008).  Instead, most consumers rely  on what they see in the headline and visual, which is why so much emphasis is placed on  the clarity and simplicity of both of these.  The potential for visuals to communicate 
  14. 14. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     14  instantly, rather than requiring consumers to take the time of physically reading a headline,  could increase the amount of information the consumers can get from the ad at first glance.  Jennifer Johnson agrees.  “Your visuals should do as much of the work in your ad as  possible.”  While she emphasizes that many great ads do rely on copy, the trend in the  industry is moving toward increased visuals.  Above all, she mandates that effective ads  need to be simple, and she believes visuals can often achieve simplicity better than text can  (2007).      Shaw notes, too, that advertising is not the only industry to have an increased  reliance on visuals to convey its message.  She cites an increase in pictures and video in  news media to tell stories and entertain.  “People are expecting to see more visuals and get  more instant information from them,” she says (2008).  The ad industry trend toward  increased reliance on visuals to communicate could be a response to match consumers’  sophistication and increased visual literacy.  Shaw also stresses that copy‐free ads are not yet the norm in most consumer print,  and that not every brand or every product can use them successfully.  “[Ads that rely  completely on visuals] are great for brands like [Tabasco and Orbit], but you can’t use an ad  like this to sell insurance,” she says of copy‐free print (2008).  She believes that visual‐only  ads work best for established brands trying to convey a single, simple message.  In  response to the recent trend towards copyless ads in creative awards shows like the Clios  and One Show, she says, “I don’t place much stock in awards shows.  I’m in the business  world.”  This statement suggests that the business world of advertising has different values 
  15. 15. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     15  and goals from the world of creative awards shows, and that creative awards do not always  translate into advertising effectiveness.    This belief underscores the importance of studying the effectiveness of visual  advertising, especially as compared to verbal.  As Shaw said, the most important thing for  an ad to be is relevant; secondly, simple.  Regardless of how many creative awards an ad  might win, in the business world, its goal is to effectively communicate with consumers.   This leads to the question:  do visual messages present their argument more simply and  clearly than verbal messages, especially when the complex rhetorical figure of tropes is  involved?  RESEARCH QUESTION    Further research is needed to determine the different strengths and weaknesses of  verbal and visual tropes in advertising.  Therefore, this study was conducted to answer the  following research question:    Do visual and verbal tropes in advertising have different effects on memory,  attitude, and comprehension?  METHODS  Procedures    To answer this question, a study was designed to directly compare the effectiveness  of the same trope expressed in words and in pictures.  Two groups of university students  were asked to read an article that related to media in society.  One group read and article  that included ads with visual tropes; the other read an article with ads that used verbal 
  16. 16. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     16  tropes.  After five days, participants took an online survey in which they answered  questions that measured their memory, comprehension, and attitude about the ads.   Two advertisements that use visual rhetoric to convey their messages represented  visual tropes in this study.  Both of these advertisements have won awards from  prestigious creative advertising associations:  the Tabasco ad “Cigarette” by Sino Pacific has  won a Cannes Gold Lion, and the Orbit White ad “Lampshade” by BBDO Chicago has won a  New York Festivals award.  These honors ensure that the ads are the type of creatively  applauded ads referred to earlier.  Both ads are completely free of copy except the  appearance of the brand names.  Both Tabasco and Orbit have high brand awareness  within the audience surveyed.  Both brands also have large target audiences that  encompass the 18‐ to 24‐year‐olds surveyed in this study.  Both are the types of parity  products that Sarah Shaw had cited as products that can convey effective messages with  visual tropes.    In order to compare these visual tropes to verbal tropes, their messages were  translated into text for the comparison ads that the second group of survey participants  would read.  The original Tabasco ad that uses visual trope is an image of a man’s hand  holding a cigarette that is burning from both ends.  In the background, out of focus, is a  bottle of Tabasco sauce and the corner of a plate of food (See Figure 2‐1 in the Appendix).   The verbal translation of the trope in this ad is: Tabasco sauce is so hot that after eating it,  your cigarette will burn from both ends because your mouth will start the “wrong” end on fire.   To compare this message verbally, the message is translated into the copy Caution:  May 
  17. 17. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     17  cause your cigarettes to burn from both ends.  The copy for this ad is stylized fit the layout of  the Tabasco label (See Figure 2‐2).  This art direction in which the ad copy replaces the words on the label comes from  another award‐winning campaign run by Tabasco that featured close‐up shots of the label  with ad copy instead of the brand name and descriptive text on the label.  Using this  particular layout is validated because Tabasco has already run ads with this type of art  direction.  The main message for consumers to take away from both versions of this ad is  that Tabasco sauce is extremely hot.    The second ad used in the study is for Orbit White, a variety of Orbit gum.  The  original Orbit White ad that uses visual tropes contains an image of a woman whose head is  covered by a lampshade.  The shade appears illuminated, as though light is radiating from  her head.  She is holding a pack of Orbit White gum.  The background features 1970’s‐style  patterned wallpaper (See Figure 2‐3).  The verbal translation of the trope in this ad is that  Orbit White will make your teeth so white that you will need a lampshade to shield the  brightness of your smile.  For the verbal trope comparison ad, this is translated into the copy  Your smile will need a lampshade!  To keep the mood of the original ad, this copy is stylized  and placed over a patterned background that resembled the wallpaper background of the  original (See Figure 2‐4).  The main message for consumers to take away from this ad is  that Orbit White whitens teeth.    For the study, the ads were inserted into a two‐page article.  The first version of the  article, given to one group of participants, contained the ads from both brands that used  visual tropes to convey their messages.  The second version of the article, given to the other 
  18. 18. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     18  group of participants, contained the Tabasco and Orbit ads that used verbal tropes.  Each  ad up the left half of a two‐page spread; the right half contained the text of the article  (See  Figures 2‐5 and 2‐6).  This format was chosen to simulate a more realistic reading  experience, rather than having the students specifically study the advertisements in  question outside of a natural reading context.  The article for the survey was chosen  because it discussed media in society, which was the topic of a class in which all of the  study participants were enrolled.   Students were recruited to participate in the study with the incentive of extra credit  in their introductory mass communication class.  Fifty‐six students participated in the  study; 32 read the article that included ads with verbal tropes and 24 read the article that  included ads with visual tropes.  The participants ranged in age from 17 to 25 and were  comprised of 32% male students and 68% female students.  They represented 17 different  majors and multiple ethnicities.    Participants were split into two sessions for reading the article.  Each group was  asked to read the article silently in a group setting and answer a follow‐up survey five days  later.  They were not allowed to take the handouts with them or to take notes about the  handouts.  They were not advised as to what type of questions would be on the survey, but  were instructed that it would ask questions about what they had read.  Participants  received the survey via email and had two days to complete it to earn their extra credit  points.     
  19. 19. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     19  Analysis  The survey first measured unaided recall of both brands by asking “Which brands, if  any, do you remember being advertised on the same handout as the article?”  On the next  page, respondents were prompted with the brand name Tabasco and then asked whether  they remembered the ad.  If they did remember, they were given two open‐ended  questions. The first, “What do you remember about this ad?” was designed to measure the  salience of each ad’s message.  The imprecise wording of this question was chosen  intentionally in order to give respondents liberty to describe what they remembered most  clearly or most prominently.  Measuring the salience of the ad’s message helps determine  whether the readers understood the key message of the ad, and what elements of the ad  were remembered most clearly and prominently.    Responses to the prompt for respondents to list what they remembered about each  ad were coded according to whether they identified the main message that the ad  communicated.  Answers that correctly expressed the message affirmed that the ad’s  message was the most salient memory in the respondents’ minds. Two types of answers  were accepted:  those that mentioned key elements of the trope that were integral to its  meaning, and those that correctly translated the trope into plain English that conveyed the  main message of the ad.  The most important point about the trope itself in the Tabasco ad  was that the cigarette would burn at both ends; for Orbit, it was that the smile would need  a lampshade.  In plain English, the main messages for the ads were that Tabasco sauce is hot  and that Orbit gum whitens teeth.  Above all, accepted responses affirmed that the message  of the ad was the most salient element in consumers’ minds and was remembered first 
  20. 20. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     20  when they were prompted about the ad.  This measurement helps answer the question of  comprehension, but mostly investigates more deeply the question of memory.  This  question and the coding of the answers explain not just whether the ad was remember, but  what about it was remembered.  Specifically for verbal tropes, accepted answers identified elements about what the  copy said.  Sample accepted answers included:  • “it will make your cigarette burn at both ends” (for Tabasco)  • “this gum will make your smile bright.” (for Orbit)  Unaccepted answers alluded to the layout of the text or other visual elements of the  ad that did not relate to its message.  Some of these included:  • “I remember that it was a zoomed in picture of a tabasco bottle.” (for Tabasco)  • “not much.  I just remember the logo.” (for Orbit)  For visual tropes, accepted answers identified visual elements that conveyed the  ad’s meaning:  • “It was a picture of a hand holding a cigarette that was burning at both ends.   Behind is a bottle of Tabasco on the table.” (for Tabasco)  • “It was a person with a lampshade on their head, and it looked like there was a  light coming from her head.  (Presumably her teeth)” (for Orbit)  Unaccepted answers cited visual elements that did not contribute to the ad’s  message.  For example, unaccepted answers for the Tabasco visual trope may have noted a  cigarette in the frame, but did not mention that it was burning at both ends, the crucial 
  21. 21. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     21  detail that conveyed the ad’s message that Tabasco sauce is hot.  Unaccepted answers  included:  • “There was someone holding a cigarette, the picture just showed the person's right  hand holding the lit cigarette between their fingers.” (for Tabasco)  • “I just remember a woman with the gum, but her entire head was covered, you could  just see her torso and legs.  She wasn't wearing anything that was ‘revealing’, and  the ad seemed really low key, maybe even a bit melancholy.” (for Orbit)  Many other unacceptable responses were variations of “I don’t remember,” or “I  don’t know.” For a complete list of responses, please see the appendix.  The second open‐ended question, “What do you think the ad was trying to say (its  message)?” was intended to measure the clarity with which respondents could describe the  ad’s main message.  If respondents were able to accurately remember and restate the ads’  main messages, the ad would be determined to be highly comprehendible.  Responses to the question of what the respondent judged to be the ad’s main  message were coded by whether the main message was correctly identified.  Accepted  answers for Tabasco mentioned that Tabasco sauce was hot; accepted answers for Orbit  mentioned that Orbit gum whitens teeth.  Respondents were also asked to rank on a Likert scale of 1‐7 how much they agreed  with the following statements:  • This ad grabbed my attention.  • The main message of this ad was easy to understand.  • I liked this ad. 
  22. 22. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     22  These statements were designed to measure how attention‐grabbing they perceived  the ad to be, how easy they found the ad to comprehend, and what their attitude toward  the ad was.  On the Likert scale, a “1” response indicated that the respondent strongly  agreed with the statement; a “7” indicated that he or she strongly disagreed.  A “4” response  is considered neutral.  The same questions were repeated regarding the ad that the participant saw for  Orbit.  The final page asked participants to optionally submit demographic information.  RESULTS    In unaided recall, the Tabasco ad that used verbal tropes was remembered more  frequently; there was little difference between the recall of ads that used verbal or visual  Figure 3 - 0 trope for the Orbit brand (See Figure 3‐1).  For  the Tabasco ad, 40.6% of respondents who had  seen the verbal iteration of the ad were able to  identify the brand name without being  prompted; just 16.7% of respondents who had  seen the visual version could name the brand.   For the Orbit ad, of those who had seen the  verbal trope, 28.1% remembered the brand without a prompt; 25% remembered the visual  trope version.     For aided recall, the ads that used verbal tropes were remembered more frequently  for both brands (See Figure 3‐2 on the next page).  The difference was more dramatic for  Tabasco.  Of the respondents who had seen the verbal trope, 78.1% remembered the ad 
  23. 23. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     23  when supplied with the brand name.  Just  Figure 3 - 2 29.2% of those who had seen the visual  version remembered the ad after being  given the brand name.  For Orbit, 46.9% of  respondents remembered the verbal ad  when prompted; 33.3% remembered the  visual ad.   For the open‐ended question, “What  do you remember about this ad?” respondents who had seen the ads with visual tropes  gave accepted answers that identified key messages more often than respondents who had  seen ads with verbal tropes (See Figure 3‐3).  For the Tabasco ads, 28.6% of respondents  who saw the visual trope identified that the sauce was so hot that it caused the cigarette to  burn from both ends. Just 8.7% of those who saw the ad with verbal trope mentioned  responses about Tabasco being hot or a cigarette burning at both ends.  For Orbit, 50% of  respondents who saw the visual trope  Figure 3 - 3 mentioned the key point of the lampshade  on the woman’s head because of the  brightness of her teeth, while only 7.7% of  those who saw the verbal trope could  identify that the ad was about needing a  lampshade for a bright smile or that Orbit  whitens teeth.  
  24. 24. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     24  An analysis of the content of these open‐ended questions shows that even in the ads  that used verbal trope, most respondents remembered visual elements of the ad.  In fact,  52% of those who remembered the Tabasco ad mentioned that the copy was designed in  the layout of the Tabasco label.  Of those who remembered the Orbit ad, 20% mentioned  Figure 3 - 4 the paisley background.  These numbers  greatly exceeded the 8.7% and 7.7% who  cited the message of the ads as something  they remembered.     Responses to the question, “What  do you think the ad was trying to say?”  were also coded by whether respondents  correctly identified the main message.  For  the Orbit brand, the visual trope garnered accepted answers more frequently than did  verbal trope; there was no significant difference in the Tabasco ads (See Figure 3‐4).  Of  respondents who had seen the visual trope in the Orbit ad, 40% correctly identified its  main message; 23.1% of those who had seen the verbal trope did the same.  In the Tabasco  ad, 14.3% of those who saw the visual trope and 13% of those who saw the verbal trope  correctly identified the main message.    Respondents were also asked to rank whether they agreed with opinion statements  about the ads on a Likert scale of 1‐7, with a 1 response meaning “strongly agree” and a 7  response meaning “strongly disagree.”  The results for all three of the statements showed  little difference between the visual and verbal tropes (See Figure 3‐5).  T‐tests determined 
  25. 25. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     25  only one result to be statistically significant:  the difference in the ability for the verbal  Tabasco ad to grab the viewers’ attention more than the visual version of the same ad  (p=0.028).  For the statement, “This ad grabbed my attention,” respondents who had seen  Figure 3 - 5 the verbal Tabasco ad rated it a 2.9 on a 7  point scale with 1 being “strongly agree.”   Those who had seen the visual version of the  ad rated it a 4.4, slightly below a “neutral”  ranking of 4.  Seventy‐one percent of  respondents gave the Tabasco ad with verbal  trope a positive value rating of 1, 2, or 3  responses that all indicate agreement with the statement.  Only 29% of those who saw the  visual trope gave a positive value rating.  The most frequent response for the verbal trope  was a 2 with 38% of the responses, indicating fairly strong agreement with the statement  about the adding grabbing attention.  Also, none of the respondents who saw the visual ad  rated its ability to grab their attention as a 1 or 2.  The range of responses for the verbal  trope was 1‐6; for visual, 3‐7.  The responses to this question correspond to the  significantly higher number of respondents who remembered the Tabasco ad with the  verbal trope versus the visual trope in both unaided and aided recall.    For the Orbit ad, the small difference in responses was not statistically significant.   On average, those who saw the verbal trope rated it a 3.5; the visual trope, 3.3.   Forty‐six  percent of respondents who saw the verbal trope gave it a positive value rating; 50% of  those who saw the visual trope did the same.  The mode for the verbal trope was 5 with 
  26. 26. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     26  38% responses; for visual trope, a 4 with 38%.  The range of responses for both types of  tropes was 1‐6.    The second statement measured by Likert scale read, “The main message of this ad  was easy to understand.”  The degree to which respondents agreed with this statement  demonstrated their perceived clarity of the ad’s message and their ability to comprehend it.    Figure 3 - 6 For this statement, t‐tests determined that  the differences in responses for both brands  were not statistically significant (See Figure  3‐6).  The average response for those who  saw the verbal trope for Orbit was 2.8; for the  visual trope, it was 3.8.  Additionally, 69% of  respondents gave the verbal trope a positive  value rating.  The mode was a 1, or “strongly agree,” which was selected by 38% of  respondents.  Of those who saw the visual trope, 37% gave it a positive value rating; the  mode was a neutral 4 rating with 25% of responses.  There was a wide range of responses  for each type of trope; both had ranges of 1‐7.    For the Tabasco ad, also, the results were similar for both the verbal and visual  trope.  The average response for verbal trope was 3.3; for visual, 3.6.  Fifty percent of  respondents exposed to the verbal trope gave it a positive value rating, as did 43% of those  who saw the visual trope.  The mode response to the verbal trope was a 2, with 29% of  responses.  There was a wide variation of responses to the visual trope.  An equal  percentage of respondents (29%) rated the ad a 2, meaning that they agreed that the 
  27. 27. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     27  message was easy to understand, as they did a 5, meaning that they slightly disagreed.  The  two had similar ranges, as well; responses to the verbal trope ranged from 1‐7; to the visual  trope, 1‐6.      The final statement about which respondents rated their agreement was, “I liked  this ad.”  This statement measured the positive or negative attitude that respondents had  Figure 3 - 7 about the ads.  No statistical difference was  detected in between visual and verbal  tropes for either brand (See Figure 3‐7).   For Tabasco, the ad with verbal trope  earned an average 3.5 rating with 33% of  respondents giving it a 3 rating, the most  frequent response.  Sixty‐two percent of  respondents gave this ad a positive value rating, and the range of responses was between  1‐7.  Results for the visual trope were very similar.  The average rating was 3.7, although  the mode was lower as 43% of respondents rated the ad a 5.  Forty‐three percent of  respondents gave the visual trope a positive value rating.  The range of responses was  much smaller and only varied from 2‐5.    For the Orbit ad, results were also similar for both types of trope.  The average  response for the verbal trope was a 3.3 with 23% of respondents choosing 3 and 23%  choosing 4.  Fifty‐four percent of respondents gave the verbal trope a positive value rating,  and the range of responses was 1‐6.  For the visual ad, the average was a very similar 3.1.  
  28. 28. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     28  However, the range of responses was much smaller at 2‐5.  Sixty‐two percent of  respondents gave the visual trope a positive value rating with the mode being a 2 at 37%.    For results and accompanying charts, please see the appendix.  DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS  The survey results point to two distinct conclusions:  that verbal tropes were  recalled more frequently, but that visual tropes resulted in increased comprehension.  The difference between recall of verbal tropes and visual tropes is significant,  especially for the Tabasco ad.  For both unaided and aided recall, the percentage of  respondents who remembered the ad with the visual trope was more than double the  percentage of those who remembered the ad with the verbal trope (40.6% and 16.7%  unaided; 78.1% and 29.2% aided).  The difference is less dramatic for the Orbit ad, but still significant in terms of aided  recall.  Although the unaided recall numbers are similar (28.1% verbal and 25% visual), the  percentage of respondents who remembered the Orbit ad after the brand name prompt  was higher for those who had seen the verbal trope than the visual trope (46.9% versus  33.3%).  Several factors within the ads themselves may have affected these results.  In both of  the ads that used verbal tropes, visual cues that identified the brand name were larger and  more prominent.  This increased importance of the brand name may have made brand  identification easier or more salient for readers and facilitated brand recall.  In the Orbit ad  with verbal trope, the logo and brand name occupied approximately twice the area that  they did in the ad with visual trope.  Similarly, the brand name in the Tabasco ad with 
  29. 29. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     29  visual trope is blurred and placed in the background, whereas in the ad with verbal trope,  the entire layout of the ad suggests the Tabasco bottle and represents the brand identity.  Although the brand identities may have been more firmly established in the ads  with verbal trope, this difference could be argued to be characteristic of ads that primarily  use verbal tropes to convey their messages.  Using images to convey so much of the  message limits the space that can be used to display identifying brand characteristics.  Ads  with verbal tropes, however, can rely on just a few words to convey their messages, and  therefore have more physical space to devote to branding.  The implications for advertisers  are that prominent brand identification may facilitate recall, and that further research  should be conducted to measure the effects of visual and verbal tropes that blatantly  display the brand name with those that use more subtle branding techniques.  Another important factor may have been the degree to which the ads immediately  surprised or intrigued the readers with unexpected or unusual elements.  Regarding the  Tabasco ad, t‐tests confirm that respondents agreed with the statement “This ad grabbed  my attention” significantly more often for the ad with verbal trope than the one with visual  trope.  But as already stated, the design and layout of this ad takes a familiar image (the  Tabasco label) and changes it into something unexpected.  Because of this unexpectedness,  this art direction may be inherently more attention‐grabbing than the more subtle image of  the cigarette with both ends burning.   Similarly, the visual trope in the Orbit ad was comprehended better than the one in  the Tabasco ad.  This could be because the Orbit ad contains a more blatantly unexpected  image than the Tabasco ad.  The lampshade that replaced the woman’s head was larger, 
  30. 30. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     30  brighter, and more surprising than the smoldering “wrong end” of the cigarette in the  Tabasco ad.  Its novelty may have aided in respondents’ ability to recall and restate its  message.  Taking something familiar and changing it to make it novel or unexpected  appeals to readers’ desire to engage with the ad and figure out the meaning of familiar  objects or ideas used in new ways (Pricken).  This is the appeal of tropes in general for  advertisers.  The implication is that advertisers should consider using tropes that  immediately telegraph to the reader that they have taken something ordinary and changed  it into a new message in order to spark the readers’ attention and motivate them to engage  with the ad.  While smaller percentages of respondents remembered ads that used visual tropes,  those who did remember were better able to restate the ads’ meanings.  However, they did  not perceive the ads as easier to understand.  For the Orbit ad, responses to the statement  “The main message of this ad was easy to understand” contrasted the data from the open‐ ended questions that asked respondents to list what they remembered about the ads and  what the ads’ main messages were.  Although respondents did not perceive the visual trope  to be easier to understand than verbal, they recalled key points of the ad and the ad’s main  message more frequently than did respondents who were exposed to the verbal trope.    Responses to this statement for the Tabasco ad were statistically similar for both  types of trope.  This accurately reflected how readers interpreted the ad, because their  ability to restate the main message of the ad in the open‐ended question was also similar  for both types of trope.  However, in responding to the question, “What do you remember  about this ad?” they listed key elements of the ad that directly contributed to its meaning 
  31. 31. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     31  more often with for the ad the visual tropes than the verbal tropes.  This suggests that  although respondents may have accurately gauged their comprehension of the ads’ main  messages to be similar, the specific idea of the cigarette burning at both ends was more  salient for respondents who had seen the ad with visual trope.  The fact that respondents comprehended the visual tropes better but did not judge  them to be easier to comprehend suggests that visual tropes might demand more  elaboration from readers in order to understand their messages.  Since readers could more  accurately restate the message of visual ads, they might be expected to have judged these  as easier to understand.  However, they judged both types of trope as very similar in terms  of how easy they are to understand.  The increased comprehension and retention of the  main messages in ads that are not any easier to understand could be linked to the  Elaboration Likelihood Model (Petty 1986, 1999).  This model indicates that when  consumers elaborate on the arguments of the message to a certain extent, changes in their  attitude regarding the ad and the brand are longer lasting.  The same general principles can  be applied to this study.  When readers take the time to elaborate on the visual ads and  complete their meaning, they understand the meaning better and are more likely to be able  to restate that meaning.  Other studies have indicated that incomplete information in advertisements— information that the reader must mentally figure out and complete to determine its  meaning—is often remembered better than stimuli that do not require as much elaboration  (Heimbach 1972).  Although the ads themselves were not remembered as frequently when  visuals that required completion from the reader were given, their messages were 
  32. 32. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     32  comprehended better.  This theory supports the idea that visual tropes might ask the  readers to engage more with the ad, which not all readers are motivated or able to do.  But  those who do elaborate on the visual trope and understand its meaning will retain that  message better that those who just skim a line of text.  The implication for advertisers is  that they need to weigh the advantage of more people reading and remembering an ad that  requires less elaboration against the advantage of fewer people elaborating on an ad to a  greater extent but comprehending the ad’s message more clearly.  Another important conclusion drawn from the results is that visual elements in all  ads, even ones with primarily verbal messages, are the elements of the ads recalled most  frequently.  In the Tabasco ad with verbal trope, 52% of respondents cited a visual element  of the ad when asked what they remembered.  They listed details about the layout of the  text or the suggested image of the bottle about six times more often than they stated any  part of the ad’s message.  Additionally, in the Orbit ad with verbal trope, 20% of  respondents mentioned a visual element of the ad like the paisley background.  The  implication of this finding is an affirmation that art direction is crucial to an ad’s successful  communication, because visual elements were by far the respondents’ most salient  memories of the ads.  SUGGESTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH  Further study into the advantages over visual trope versus verbal trope should  include experiments that measure only attitude and comprehension, rather than recall.   Although the setting of these ads would be less realistic than that of this study, the 
  33. 33. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     33  response pool would not be diminished by participants who had forgotten or ignored the  ads.    To create a more realistic reading environment, the ads could be inserted into  magazines and interspersed with other ads that did not use trope at all.  Comparing ads in  this setting could give more accurate results as to how attention‐grabbing ads with visual  and verbal trope really are, and whether they are recalled more frequently than ads  without a form of trope.  Another important point of differentiation in future studies would be to ensure that  ads with both verbal and visual tropes were measured against ads that use only one of  these devices.  Morgan and Reichert’s study (1999) that found metaphors with both visuals  and copy to be more effective than copy alone opens a door for new research possibilities  that compare different combinations of tropes.  One question to examine is whether  relaying the message in both visuals and copy would diminish the readers’ need for  elaboration and make the results similar to copy‐only ads, in which the message wasn’t  remembered or comprehended as well.   CONCLUSION  So who is right—the One Show and their copy‐free images or David Ogilvy and his  blatant headlines?  Although more research is required to draw absolute conclusions, this  study indicates that consumers’ visual literacy enables them to comprehend visual tropes  more effectively than verbal.  It seems that while verbal tropes might communicate their  brand identity more quickly or easily with readers, eliciting a higher recall rate, the  consumers who are motivated to engage with visual ads internalize their meaning better 
  34. 34. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     34  than those who just read a headline.  Advertisers must understand that their consumers  are sophisticated and visually literate.  They must weigh the advantage of making their ad  easier to recall with consumers’ increased comprehension of its message. 
  35. 35. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     35  References  Effie Awards.  (2007, November 15).  <http://www.effie.org>  Forceville, C. (1996).  Pictorial metaphor in advertising.  New York:  Routledge.  Heimbach J.T., & Jacoby J.  (1972).  The Zeigernik effect in advertising.  In M. Venkatesan  (Ed.).  Proceedings of the Third Annual Conference (Association for Consumer  Research).  p. 746‐758.  Hitchon, J. C. (1997).  The locus of metaphorical persuasion:  An empirical test.  Journalism  and Mass Communication Quarterly, 74(1), 55‐68.  Johnson, J.  (2008, February 28).  Personal interview.  Kaplan, S. J. (1992), "A Conceptual Analysis of Form and Content in Visual Metaphors,"  Communication, 13(2), 197‐209.  Lester, P. M. (2002).  Visual Communication:  Images with Messages.  Belmont, CA:  Thomson  Wadsworth.  Messaris, P. (1992).  “Visual ‘Manipulation’: Visual Means of Affecting Responses to  Images,” Communication, 13(3), 181‐195.  Messaris, P. (1997).  Visual Persuasion:  The Role of Images in Advertising.  Thousand Oaks,  CA:  Sage Publications.  McQuarrie, E. F. & Mick, D. G.  (1996, March).  Figures of Rhetoric in Advertising Language.   Journal of Consumer Research, 22, 424‐438.  McQuarrie, E. F. & Mick, D. G.  (1999, June).  Visual Rhetoric in Advertising:  Text  Interpretive, Experimental, and Reader‐Response Analyses.  Journal of Consumer  Research, 26, 37‐54. 
  36. 36. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     36  Morgan, S. E. & Reichert, T.  (1999). “The Message Is in the Metaphor:  Assessing the  Comprehension of Metaphors in Advertising.”  Journal of Advertising, 28(4), 1‐12.  Ogilvy, D. (1973).  Confessions of an Advertising Man, London, England:  Southbank  Publishing.  Ogilvy, D. (1985).  Ogilvy on Advertising, London, England:  Vintage Books.  One Club.  15 November 2007  <http://www.oneclub.org>  Petty, R. E., & Cacioppo, J. T. (1986). Communication and Persuasion: Central and  Peripheral Routes to Attitude Change. New York: Springer‐Verlag.  Petty, R. E., & Wegener, D. T. (1999). The Elaboration Likelihood Model: Current Status and  Controversies. In S. Chaiken & Y. Trope (eds.), Dual Process Theories in Social  Psychology (pp. 41‐72). New York: Guilford Press.  Phillips, B. J.  (1997). “Thinking into it:  Consumer interpretation of complex advertising  images.  Journal of Advertising, 26(2), 77‐87.  Phillips, B. J.  (2000).  “The impact of verbal anchoring on consumer response to image ads.   Journal of Advertising, 29(1), 15‐24.  Phillips, B. J.  (2003).  “Understanding Visual Metaphor in Advertising.”  Persuasive Imagery,  ed. Linda M. Scott & Rajeev Batra.  297‐310.  Lawrence Erdbaum Associates.   Mahweh, NJ.  Pricken, M. (2002).  Creative Advertising:  Ideas and Techniques from the World’s Best  Campaigns.  London:  Thames & Hudson.  Scott, L. M.  “Images in Advertising:  The Need for a Theory of Visual Rhetoric.”  The Journal  of Consumer Research, September 1994, 21, 252‐273. 
  37. 37. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     37  Shaw, S.  (2008, May 1).  Personal interview.  Smith, R. A.  (1991).  “The Effects of Visual and Verbal Advertising Information on  Consumers’ Inferences.”  Journal of Advertising, 20 (4), 13‐24.  Whittock, Thomas (1990), Metaphor and Film, Cambridge, MA:  Cambridge University  Press. 
  38. 38. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     38  Appendix 1:  Sample Ads  Figure 1‐1:  Lego ad  2007 One Show Gold Award  Color: Full Page or Spread ‐ Single         
  39. 39. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     39  Figure 2‐1:  Tabasco ad with visual trope 
  40. 40. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     40  Figure 2‐2:  Tabasco ad with verbal trope 
  41. 41. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     41  Figure 2‐3:  Orbit ad with visual trope 
  42. 42. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     42  Figure 2‐4:  Orbit ad with verbal trope 
  43. 43. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     43  Figure 2‐5:  Article with visual tropes inserted
  44. 44. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     44  Figure 2‐6:  Article with verbal tropes inserted 
  45. 45. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     45  Appendix 2:  Results  Figure 3‐1:  Unaided recall                                Figure 3‐2:  Aided recall   
  46. 46. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     46  Figure 3‐3:  Recall of key points                  Figure 3‐4:  Comprehension of main message 
  47. 47. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     47  Figure 3‐5:  “This ad grabbed my attention”    Figure 3‐5b:  Tabasco Attention T‐test results      t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances   Verbal Visual Mean 2.92 4.44 Standard Deviation 1.28 1.51   P (T<=t) two-tail 0.028051264   Because p < 0.05, the difference is statistically significant. Figure 3‐5c:  Orbit Attention T‐test results  t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances Verbal Visual Mean 3.54 3.25 Standard Deviation 1.81 1.58 P (T<=t) two-tail 0.705787323 Because p > 0.05, the difference is not statistically significant.
  48. 48. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     48  Figure 3‐6:  “This ad was easy to understand”                  Figure 3‐6b:  Tabasco Comprehension T‐test results  t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances   Verbal Visual Mean 3.33 3.57   Standard Deviation 1.66 1.90 P (T<=t) two-tail 0.77143403   Because p > 0.05, the difference is not statistically significant.   Figure 3‐6c:  Orbit Comprehension T‐test results  t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances Verbal Visual Mean 2.79 3.75 Standard Deviation 1.93 2.25 P (T<=t) two-tail 0.328035521 Because p > 0.05, the difference is not statistically significant.  
  49. 49. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     49  Figure 3‐7:  “I liked this ad”                  Figure 3‐7b:  Tabasco Attitude T‐test results    t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances Verbal Visual Mean 3.49 3.71   Standard Deviation 1.56 1.38 P (T<=t) two-tail 0.683477849   Because p > 0.05, the difference is not statistically significant.   Figure 3‐7c:  Orbit Attitude T‐test results  t-Test Two-Sample Assuming Unequal Variances Verbal Visual Mean 3.29 3.13 Standard Deviation 1.49 1.13 P (T<=t) two-tail 0.778537605 Because p > 0.05, the difference is not statistically significant.
  50. 50. Visual vs. Verbal Tropes     50  Special Thanks    Shirley Nelson Garner  Jennifer Johnson  Erin Lamberty  Mary Moga  Sarah Shaw  Brian Southwell  Dan Wackman 

×