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  • 1. Christmas dinner is the primary meal traditionally eaten on ChristmasEve or Christmas Day. Christmas dinner around the world may differ andthe traditions present below can reflect the culture of the respectivecountry it is being celebrated in. Contents 1 Austria 2 France 3 Germany 4 United States 5 Lithuania, Belarus and Ukraine
  • 2. AustriaChristmas cuisine in Austria. Christmas Eve is the celebration of the endof the pre-Christmas fast. Christmas Eve is historically the day that thetree is decorated and lit with real candles, so that the Christkindl mayvisit. Christmas Day is a national holiday in Austria and most Austriansspend the day feasting with their family. Fried carp, Sacher torte andChristmas cookies (lebkuchen and sterne) are eaten, and many otherchocolate delicacies including edible Christmas ornaments. Christmasdinner is usually Goose, Ham servedwith Gluhwein, Rumpunsch, and Chocolate Mousse.
  • 3. FranceIn France and some other French-speaking countries, aréveillon is a long dinner, and possibly party, held on theevenings preceding Christmas Day and New Years Day. Thename of this dinner is based on the word réveil (meaning"waking"), because participation involves staying awake untilmidnight.
  • 4. GermanyIn Germany, the primary Christmas dishes are roast goose and roastcarp, although suckling pig or duck may also be served. Typical sidedishes include roast potatoes and various forms of cabbage suchas kale, brussel sprouts, and red cabbage. In some regions the Christmasdinner is traditionally served on Christmas Day rather than ChristmasEve. In this case, dinner on Christmas Eve is a simpler affair, consisting ofsausages or pasta salad. Sweets and Christmas pastries are nearlyobligatory and include marzipan, spice bars , several types of bread, andvarious fruitcakes and fruited breads like Christstollen and DresdenerStollen
  • 5. United StatesMost Christmas customs in the United States have been adopted from those in theUnited Kingdom.Accordingly, the mainstays of the British table are also found in theUnited States: roast turkey (or other poultry), beef, ham, or pork; stuffing (ordressing), squash, roasted root vegetables, brussels sprouts, and mashed potatoesare common. Common desserts include pumpkin pie, plum pudding or Christmaspudding, trifle, marzipan, pfeffernusse, sugar cookies, fruitcake, apple pie, GooseberryPie, carrot cake, bûche de Noël, and mince pies. In the South, coconut cake, pecanpie, and sweet potato pie are also common.The centerpiece of a sit-down meal varies on the tastes of the host but can beham, roast beef, or goose, particularly since turkey is the mainstay at dinner for theAmerican holiday of Thanksgiving in November, around one month earlier. Regionalmeals offer incredible diversity. Virginia has oysters, ham pie, and fluffy biscuits, a nodto its very English 17th century founders. The Upper Midwest includes dishes frompredominantly Scandinavian backgrounds such as lutefisk and mashed rutabaga orturnip. In some rural areas, game meats like elk, opossum or quail may grace thetable, often prepared with recipes that are extremely old: it is likely that similarfoodstuffs graced the tables of early American settlers on their first Christmases.
  • 6. Lithuania, Belarus and UkraineIn the areas of the former Polish-LithuanianCommonwealth (e.g., Lithuania, Poland), an elaborate and ritualizedmeal of twelve meatless dishes is served on the Eve of Christmas (24December), Ukraine and Belarus (6 January). This is because the pre-Christmas season is a time of fasting, which is broken on ChristmasDay.