Growth, Not Gotcha: Evaluating and Supporting Beginning Teachers

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Presentation to Illinois New Teacher Collaborative, February 2013

Presentation to Illinois New Teacher Collaborative, February 2013

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  • National work Partners with states, school districts, and policymakers to design and implement program and policies that create sustainable, high quality mentoring and PD; Build leadership Capacity;Work to enhance teaching conditions;Improve retention; and Transform schools into vibrant learning communities where all students succeed. In 2011-12, NTC was present in 38 statesImplementing comprehensive induction programs in 16 districtsWork in IllinoisThe Joyce FoundationInform state policy on teacher induction and mentoringGuide the development of induction program standards and program toolsLead statewide induction program leadership network (Grand Victoria Foundation)Induction support – Chicago Public Schools
  • Participants will Gain a deeper understanding of the developmental needs of new teachersExplore the following questions:Does the state’s Performance Evaluation Reform Act provide sufficient, actionable feedback to strengthen new teachers’ practices?How can instructional feedback be provided to new teachers through evaluation systems as well as through aligned policy and program elements?
  • The “greening” of the teaching force1987-88 common teacher in US had 15 years of teaching experienceToday the typical teacher has spent just a single year in the classroomDisproportionate distribution of new teachersLow-income/low-achieving students are most likely assigned a beginning teachers
  • Anticipation - begins during the student teaching portion of preservice preparation. The closer student teachers get to completing their assignment, the more excited and anxious they become about their first teaching position. They tend to romanticize the role of the teacher and the position. New teachers enter with a tremendous commitment to making a difference and a somewhat idealistic view of how to accomplish their goals. Survival - The first month of school is very overwhelming. Despite teacher preparation programs, BTs are caught off guard by the realities of teaching. During the survival phase, most new teachers struggle to keep their heads above water. Although tired and surprised by the amount of work, first-year teachers usually maintain a tremendous amount of energy and commitment during the survival phase, harboring hope that soon the turmoil will subside.Disillusionment - Entered after six to eight weeks of nonstop work and stress. The intensity and length of the phase varies among new teachers. The extensive time commitment, the realization that things are probably not going as smoothly as they want, and low morale contribute to this period of disenchantment. BTs begin questioning both their commitment and their competence. Many new teachers get sick during this phase.Rejuvenation -The rejuvenation phase is characterized by a slow rise in the BT’s attitude toward teaching. It generally begins in January. Having a winter break makes a tremendous difference for BTs. Through their experiences in the first half of the year, BTs gain new coping strategies and skills to prevent, reduce, or manage many problems they are likely to encounter in the second half of the year. During this phase, new teachers focus on curriculum development, long-term planning and teaching strategies.Reflection - Begins in May and is a particularly invigorating time for first-year teachers. Reflecting back over the year, they highlight events that were successful and those that were not. They think about the various changes that they plan to make the following year in management, curriculum, and teaching strategies. The end is in sight, and they have almost made it; but more importantly, a vision emerges as to what their second year will look like, which brings them to a new phase of anticipation.
  • States are demanding greater accountability but flagging on their commitment to develop and support new teachersFew states have induction policies (2012)27 states required teacher inductionOnly 11 required 2 or more years17 states provided dedicated funding for induction and mentoringOnly 11 states provided funding to all of its school districtsEvaluation alone cannot sufficiently inform and accelerate new teacher development
  • Performance evaluation reform act (PERA)Signed 2010 by Governor Pat QuinnRequires annual evaluation of teachers and principals Based on standards of effective practiceObservations by trained evaluatorsincorporate student growth4 performance categoriesExcellent, Proficient, News Improvement or UnsatisfactorySenate Bill 7Enacted June 2011 Sets standard and rules for license suspension filling positions, tenure acquisition, reductions in force and layoffs and recall rights
  • 2002 – state established a teacher induction mandate, “provided that funding is made available”Authorized at $1,200 per beginning teacher, never close2006-07 – State grant program for induction Peaked at $10 million in 2008-9 60 teacher induction/mentoring district or consortia 2008 – Illinois Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Beginning Teacher Induction ProgramsApproved by Illinois State Teacher Certification BoardSets framework for the development of research-based induction program ISBE – Requires these standards for 35 RTT districts And is using the standards to revise the state’s induction grant rules 2010 – Illinois Induction Program ContinuumCompanion doc to the standardsDescribes program development across multiple levels – common language Support for Beginning Teachers in Illinois The state has lagged in its commitment to fund induction for new teachersState policy deems induction desirable, but optionalInduction support varies widelyEvaluation is misunderstood as a means to provide feedback and support to teachersInduction in IL is not a vehicle for instructional supportEnvisioned as a key element to strengthen educator effectiveness and student performance
  • Most district leaders think of induction as separate from evaluation.CCSSR & IERC(examples of districts that have made the connection)School District U-46 (Elgin)Niles Township High School District 219
  • New teachers should be held to the same teaching standards as experienced teachersTwo districts that have taken a different approach:ChicagoElgin
  • AIR -- An evaluation system must be Designed and implemented well to inform teacher learning and strengthen classroom practiceTied to standards and ensure that teacher performance is assessed against those standardsInformed by data from various sourcesInclude measures of student learning and growthA priority within the district with dedicated time, training and support for evaluatorsAn Evaluation system must be integrated with other processes that support growthSuch a system would includeOpportunities for ongoing conversations among teachers, peers, evaluators, instructional coaches and mentors about professional performance, data, and improvement Multiple observations per year (MET suggests 4) Multiple observers (MET) Pre- and Post-observation conferences Trained evaluators Actionable feedback Frequent Informal observations/formative assessment of new teachers
  • Key elements of Induction that improve practice Multi-year program Well trained mentors Mentors who are released from classroom duties Formative assessment that is aligned to the standards/expectations of the evaluation system Time for beginning teachers to work with mentors Common planning time with other teachers Ongoing communication and support from school leaders Reduced teaching load Recognizes the steep and unique learning curve of beginning teachers

Transcript

  • 1. Growth, Not Gotcha:Evaluating and Supporting Beginning TeachersINTC 8th Annual Induction and Mentoring Conference February 26, 2013 Liam Goldrick Director of Policy Dalia Zabala Associate Director of Policy
  • 2. when we focus on teachers, our students succeedCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 3. New Teacher Center• Focuses on improving student achievement by accelerating the effectiveness of new teachers and school leaders• Founded in 1998 as part of University of California, Santa Cruz• Became an independent non-profit in 2009• Policy & program work in Illinois began in 2005Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 4. OutcomesPARTICIPANTS WILL EXPLORE…• The developmental needs of new teachers• The relationship & alignment between induction and evaluation• The utilization of coaches/mentors/evaluators• The development and leveraging of teacher leadership• The role and responsiveness of state policyCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 5. New Teachers The Changing Face of the Teaching Force Richard Ingersoll and Lisa Merrill http://www.gse.upenn.edu/review/feature/ingersolCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 6. New Teachers (continued)Ellen Moir, 1990http://newteachercenter.org/blog/phases-first-year-teachingCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 7. New Teachers and TeacherEvaluation• Evaluation systems do not sufficiently prioritize teacher development• Evaluation is often the sole means of feedback on teachers’ performance• States are demanding greater accountability but flagging on their commitment to develop and support new teachers • 43 states require annual teacher evaluations • Only 11 require induction/mentoring for all 1st& 2nd year teachersCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 8. The Illinois Context2010 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION REFORM ACT (PERA)• Requires annual evaluation of teachers and principals• 4 performance categories• Districts have two options: • Develop their own system • Use all or portions of a state-designed modelPERFORMANCE EVALUATION ADVISORY COUNCIL (PEAC)• Provides input from educators to ISBE• Monitors PERA• Developed rules for districts developing their own systemCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 9. The Illinois Context (continued)TEACHER INDUCTION IN ILLINOIS• 2002 – state established a teacher induction mandate, ―provided that funding is made available‖• 2006-07 – State grant program for induction• Illinois RTT grant – includes induction funding in 35 participating RTT districts• 2008 – Illinois Standards of Quality and Effectiveness for Beginning Teacher Induction Programs• 2010 – Illinois Induction Program ContinuumCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 10. Illinois Education LeadersCONCERNS FROM ILLINOIS EDUCATION LEADERS1. The connection between teacher evaluation and induction is rarely considered or made.2. The needs of new teachers are not systematically factored into the design of evaluation systems.• Illinois has not made induction a central component of a statewide educator effectiveness system.• Most district leaders think of induction as separate from evaluation.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 11. Illinois Education Leaders (continued)ISSUES THAT EMERGED• New teachers should be held to the same teaching standards as experienced teachers• Distinguishing between feedback • from formal observations vs. • feedback that is formative in nature• Districts can align the induction and evaluation by using the Danielson Framework• Limitations in the number of educators receiving evaluator certification trainingCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 12. What Evidence Suggests aboutEvaluationEVALUATION MUST BE INTEGRATED WITH OTHERPROCESSES THAT SUPPORT GROWTH• Opportunities for ongoing conversations• Multiple observations per year• Multiple observers• Pre- and Post-observation conferences• Trained evaluators• Actionable feedback• Frequent Informal observations/formative assessment of new teachersCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 13. What Evidence Suggests aboutInductionIMPACT OF INDUCTION• The greatest improvement in instructional practice takes place in the early years in the classroom• Comprehensive induction programs • accelerate the effectiveness of beginning teachers • produces greater student learning gains • have a positive impact on new teacher retentionCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 14. What Evidence Suggests aboutInduction (continued)KEY ELEMENTS OF INDUCTION THAT IMPROVE PRACTICE• Multi-year program• Well trained mentors• Mentors who are released from classroom duties• Formative assessment aligned to evaluation• Time for beginning teachers to work with mentors• Common planning time with other teachers• Ongoing communication and support from school leaders• Reduced teaching load• Recognition of the steep and unique learning curveof beginning teachersCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 15. Aligning Evaluation and InductionALIGNING EVALUATION AND INDUCTION Have one set of expectations/standards for both induction and evaluation Use results from evaluation to Plan professional development for an individual teacher Identify training opportunities for a group of teachers Develop individualized learning plans Inform mentoring and coaching Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 16. Models of Evaluation Systems thatSupport New TeachersHILLSBOROUGH COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS, MONTGOMERYCOUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS, AND PLEASANTON UNIFIEDSCHOOL DISTRICT• Duration of induction support• Support providers vs. evaluators• Program embedded in a support system• Number of observations per year• Post-observation conference• Expectations for new teachers• Training and support for evaluators and mentors• Release time for mentors/coachesCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 17. Models of Evaluation Systems thatSupport New Teachers (continued)ALIGNMENT BETWEEN EVALUATION AND INDUCTIONHillsborough Montgomery PleasantonThe district has a PAR program The district has a PAR program School principals arefor veteran teachers and an where consulting teachers responsible for teacherinduction program for new support and evaluate new evaluation while inductionteachers where mentors also teachers. Consulting teachers coaches support new teachers.serve as evaluators. To develop a Summative Report There are predeterminedevaluate, mentors ―swap‖ and an administrator develops a expectations for teachers inmentees three times a year. separate Evaluation Report their first and second year.Because mentors also serve as creating checks and balances to Coaches help new teachersevaluators, they are more the system. The two sets of data work toward meeting thoseacutely aware of the evaluation inform the recommendation expectations and administratorssystem and are better able to made by a separate PAR Panel evaluate the teachers’help new teachers develop to the superintendent regarding performance on the same set oftoward the goals and a teacher’s contract renewal, expectations.expectations of the evaluation. It need for continued assistance,is up to new teachers to or termination.communicate outcomes of theirevaluation to their mentor.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 18. Models of Evaluation Systems thatSupport New Teachers (continued)CHALLENGES AND LESSONS LEARNED• Credibility and buy-in from veteran teachers• Communication between evaluators and mentors• Including all stakeholders• Integrating new members• Maintaining support for the programCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 19. Recommended Priorities1. Design a comprehensive educator effectiveness system that encompasses both evaluation and robust instructional feedback and support. For new teachers, this system must include induction support aligned with PERA’s evaluation requirements.1. Encourage and enable teacher leaders to serve as teacher mentors and as peer evaluators. Instructional improvement is a collective responsibility and is too critical and time intensive an endeavor to leave solely to school administrators.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 20. Recommendations for State PolicyMakersALIGNING INDUCTION WITH EVALUATION• The Governor and the Illinois General Assembly should require districts to provide induction and mentoring support to all beginning teachers and provide dedicated state funding• State policymakers should formalize requirements for the frequency/regularity of instructional feedback to new teachers.• PEAC should recommend that ISBE establish clear expectations for the evaluation and support of new• ISBE should communicate and model the relationship between teacher induction and teacher evaluation within a broader system of educator effectiveness.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 21. Recommendations for State PolicyMakers (continued)INVOLVING TEACHERS IN PEER OBSERVATION ANDEVALUATION• The state should encourage the utilization of existing teacher leaders (instructional coaches, mentors, National Board certified teachers) as peer observers and evaluators.• ISBE and PEAC should ensure that evaluators are effectively trained not only in observing teaching, but also in conducting purposeful coaching conversations.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 22. Recommendations for PERAImplementersALIGNING INDUCTION WITH EVALUATION SYSTEMS• Every Illinois school district should operate a standards- based teacher induction program and align it with their PERA-mandated evaluation system.• School districts should pay special consideration to design elements that help align teacher evaluation and induction.• School districts should clarify the relationship between formative and summative assessment—and the purpose of classroom observations associated with each.• School superintendents and principals should schedule regular meetings between evaluators and mentors.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 23. Recommendations for PERAImplementers (continued)INVOLVING TEACHERS IN PEER OBSERVATION ANDEVALUATION• School districts should consider utilizing teacher leaders as classroom observers within PERA evaluation systems.Copyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 24. The best way to improve student learning is to strengthen the instructional practices of teachers through job-embedded professional development and instructional supportCopyright © 2013 New Teacher Center. All Rights Reserved.
  • 25. Thank you For More Information Liam Goldrick Director of Policylgoldrick@newteachercenter.org Dalia Zabala Associate Director of Policydzabala@newteachercenter.org www.newteachercenter.org