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Webscale discovery and information literacy

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Webscale discovery and information literacy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Web Scale Discovery andInformation Literacy –Solution or Problem?Sheila
Corrall,
University
of
Sheffield
iSchool
Mike
Sweet,
Credo
Reference

  • 2. The context for web scale discoverySocial
 Economic
•  24/7
online
networked
society
 •  world
financial
crisis
•  self‐service
and
mutual
support
 •  exchange‐rate
volaDlity
•  learning
communiDes
 •  service
closures
and
job
losses
•  Google
generaDon
 •  high
unemployment
Technological
 PoliDcal
•  digital
asset
management
 •  public
expenditure
cuts
•  cloud
compuDng
 •  doing
more
with
less
•  mobile
connecDvity
and
apps
 •  shared
services
•  business
use
of
social
technology
 •  demonstraDng
value
and
impact

  • 3. Perceptions of libraries, 2010“When
comparing
libraries
to
search
engines,
overwhelmingly,
Americans
consider
search
engines
to
be
more
convenient,
faster,
more
reliable
and
easier‐to‐use.
Americans
consider
libraries
to
be
more
trustworthy
and
more
accurate.
While
Americans
ranked
libraries
ahead
of
search
engines
in
trustworthiness
and
accuracy,
this
disDncDon
evaporates
when
asked
about
the
informa(on
that
is
provided
by
search
engines
and
libraries.
Most
Americans
(69%)
believe
the
informaDon
they
find
using
search
engines
is
just
as
trustworthy
as
they
would
find
from
their
library.”
 (OCLC,
2010,
p.
40)

  • 4. Next generation discovery servicesCommercial
 Open
source
•  AquaBrowser
Library

 •  Blacklight
•  BiblioCommons
 •  Fac‐Back‐OPAC
(Kochief)
•  Ebsco
Discovery
Services
 •  LibraryFind
•  Encore
(InnovaDve
Interfaces)
 •  Rapi
•  Primo
Central
(Ex
Libris)
 •  Scriblio
(WPopac)
•  SirsiDynix
Enterprise
 •  SOPAC
(Social
Opac)
•  Summon
(Serials
SoluDons)
 •  VuFind
•  Visualizer
(VTLS)
 (Breeding,
2010;

•  WorldCat
Local
(OCLC)
 Yang
&
Wagner,
2010)

  • 5. Desired features of discovery services•  Single
search/point
of
entry

 •  Did
you
mean
.
.
.?
 −  for
all
library
materials
 −  spell‐checking
mechanism
•  State‐of‐the‐art
web
interface
 •  RecommendaDons

•  Enriched
content
 •  User
contribuDons
 e.g.
book
cover
images,
user
input
 e.g.
summaries,
reviews,


•  Faceted
navigaDon
of
results
 raDng,
tagging,
folksonomies
 e.g.
dates,
formats,
locaDon
 •  RSS
feeds
•  Simple
keyword
search
box

 •  IntegraDon
with
social
 −  on
every
page
 networking
sites
•  Relevancy
ranking
 •  Persistent
links

 e.g.
influenced
by
circulaDon
data
 (Yang
&
Wagner,
2010)

  • 6. Web scale discovery – the story so far•  Combining
next‐generaDon
catalogues
with
federated
search
 −  integraDng
print
and
digital,
local
and
remote,
records
and
content
•  Providing
access
to
library
resources
within
user
workflows
 −  search
from
library
homepage,
LibGuide,
uni
portal,
Blackboard,
etc
•  Allowing
libraries
to
create
mulDple
profiles
for
communiDes
 −  subject
subsets
of
discovery
resources
to
avoid
overwhelming
users
•  Early
reports
of
dramaDc
impact
on
use
of
licensed
resources
 −  students
able
to
find
things
easily,
but
not
able
to
interpret
results
•  ImplicaDons
for
informaDon
literacy
and
reference
support
 −  from
database
searching
to
understanding
and
evaluaDng
informaDon
 (Gross
&
Sheridan,
2011;
Howard
&
Wiebrands,
2011;
Luther
&
Kelly,
2011;
 Kenney,
2011;
Way,
2010;
Wisniewski,
2010)

  • 7. “InformaDon
literacy
is
knowing
when
and
why
you
need
 informaDon,
where
to
find
it,
and
how
to
evaluate,
use
and
 communicate
it
in
an
ethical
manner.”

(CILIP,
2004)
Seven Pillars of Information Literacy (SCONUL, 2011)
  • 8. One-stop info-shopping: pros and cons✔  Convenient,
easier
and
 ✘  Dumbing
down
of
the
 faster
access
to
informaDon
 informaDon
search
process
✔  Exposure
to
a
wider
range
 ✘  Less
funcDonality
than
 of
sources
and
material
 naDve
database
interfaces
✔  Focus
on
higher‐order
 ✘  NeglecDng
development
of
 informaDon
literacy
abiliDes
 basic
informaDon
skills
✔  More
visibility
and
use
of
 ✘  Poor
foundaDon
for
higher
 library
scholarly
resources
 degrees
and
future
careers
✔  Beier
value
for
money
 from
investment
in
content

  • 9. Competing visions of the libraryThe
resource‐based
view
 InformaDon
literacy
view

•  The
library
is
essenDally
a
 •  The
library
is
essenDally
a
 bundle
of
informaDon
and
 place
of
learning
 other
resources
 •  It
creates
value
through
the
•  It
creates
value
through
use
 development
of
the
ability
 of
its
disDncDve
resources
 to
find,
evaluate
and
use
•  Resource
uDlisaDon
is
the
 informaDon
in
context
 key
performance
measure
 •  InformaDon
capability
is
the
(Barney,
1991;
Wernerfelt,
1984)
 key
performance
measure

  • 10. How?
 Advanced
search
opDons
 Librarians,
faculty
and
 grad
students
want

 more
funcAonality
 Students
need
help
 What?
 Open
 in
understanding

 Approved

 web
 search
results
 scholarly
content
 Some
use
 content
 Most
people
 Google
Scholar
 Web
scale
discovery
 start
a
search
 (with
library
links)

 steers
users
back

 with
Google
 to
the
library

 Single
search
box

  • 11. Four questions for reflection and debate1.  Are
web
scale
discovery
tools
a
good
starDng
point
 for
subject
searches
or
for
exploring
new
topics?
2.  Will
such
tools
help
students
become
competent
 informaDon
users
in
the
work
place
and
later
life?
3.  Do
we
need
to
change
our
informaDon
literacy
 educaDon
to
fit
the
new
discovery
environment?
4.  Can
we
augment
our
discovery
services
to
support
 and
deliver
our
informaDon
literacy
mission?

  • 12. Web‐scale
Discovery–

What’s
Missing
from
this
Library
Answer
to
Google?
 Session
Dtle
here

 Charleston
Conference
2011

  • 13. Agenda
•  Known
Item
vs.
Exploratory
Searching
•  On
the
Open
Web:
Google
vs.
Wikipedia
•  In
The
Library:
Web‐scale
Discovery
Systems

•  Something’s
Missing:
InformaDon
Literacy
Skill
 Reinforcement


  • 14. InformaDon
Literacy
Skills
•  Finding
research
tools
beyond
Google
and
Wikipedia
•  Understanding
the
purpose
of
the
library

•  NavigaDng
the
library

•  Assessing
quality
and
reliability
of
informaDon
•  Discerning
between
different
types
of
materials
•  ConducDng
effecDve
searches
•  Narrowing
topics
•  CiDng
sources
&
avoiding
plagiarism
 The
ERIAL
Project:
hip://www.erialproject.org/ 

  • 15. Not
All
Searches
Are
the
Same
 Known Item Searching Exploratory Searching -Have specific information -Information (article, book, journal, etc.) Need -Need general information in mind -Opportunity for -Lack subject orientation or-Familiar with keywords or Information familiarity with keywordsrelevant search terms Literacy Skill -Need guidance to start -Know where to start Reinforcement searching (website, database, stacks)
  • 16. Searching
on
the
Open
Web

  • 17. Known
Item
Searching
in
Google
 Genome DNA forterre
  • 18. Known
Item
Searching
in
Google

  • 19. Exploratory
Searching
in
Google

  • 20. Source: http://flic.kr/p/4XmARC
  • 21. Exploratory
Searching
in
Google

  • 22. Wikipedia
•  Advantages
 –  Provides
background
and
vocabulary
 –  Comprehensive,
consistent,
easy
to
access
and
use
 –  Provides
potenDally
useful
links
•  LimitaDons
 –  Not
always
trustworthy
 –  Not
customized
for
audience
 –  Doesn’t
acDvely
promote
informaDon
literacy
skills

  • 23. Known
Item
Searching
in
Discovery
Systems

  • 24. Known
Item
Searching
in
Discovery
Systems

  • 25. Exploratory
Searching
in
Discovery
Systems

  • 26. PossibiliDes
•  What
is
the
Wikipedia
equivalent
for
the
library
and
 Webscale
Discovery
Systems?
•  What
could
we
do
with
these
tools?

  • 27. Online
Reference
Services
•  Blending
of
contextual
content,
searching
and
links
•  Comprehensive
coverage
from
authoritaDve
sources
•  Giant,
interconnected
encyclopedia
•  Easily
digesDble
presentaDon
of
informaDon

  • 28. Online
Reference
Services
•  Links
to
library
curated
resources
•  Tools
for
exploraDon
and
narrowing
of
topics
•  IntegraDon
with
relevant
tools,
inc.
discovery
•  Help
and
tutorials
to
build
informaDon
literacy
skills

  • 29. Other
Approaches
to
InformaDon
Literacy

  • 30. Other
Approaches
to
InformaDon
Literacy

  • 31. Other
Approaches
to
InformaDon
Literacy

  • 32. Integration in Web-scaleDiscovery
  • 33. Summary
•  Discovery
systems
are
powerful
tools
•  Online
Reference
Services
have
the
potenDal
to
 complement
discovery
systems
AND
promote
 informaDon
literacy
skills

  • 34. Exploratory
Searching
in
Discovery
Systems

  • 35. Define information needAccess, search, find, retrieveEvaluate currency and accuracyManage and organizeIntegrate and synthesizeCreate, adapt, summarizeCommunicate and presentNovice • Advanced Beginner • Competent • Proficient • Expert
  • 36. InformaDon
Literacy
•  key
factors
to
library/faculty
informaDon
literacy
success
(as
stated
by
the
 ERIAL
Project:
hip://www.erialproject.org/).
 –  Finding
research
tools
beyond
Google
and
Wikipedia
 –  Understanding
the
purpose
of
the
library

 –  NavigaDng
the
library

 –  Assessing
quality
and
reliability
of
informaDon
 –  Discerning
between
different
types
of
materials
 –  ConducDng
effecDve
searches
 –  Narrowing
topics
 –  CiDng
sources
&
avoiding
plagiarism

  • 37. Other
Approaches
to
InformaDon
Literacy

  • 38. Library’s
Answer
to
Wikipedia
•  Provide
relevant
contextual
informaDon
•  AuthoritaDve
sources
•  Curated
links
to
local
resources


•  Help
and
tutorials
to
build
informaDon
literacy
skills
•  Provide
for
alternaDve
modes
of
topic
exploraDon
 –  VisualizaDon
tools
 –  Related
vocabulary
•  Integrated
in
key
educaDon
systems,
including
 Discovery
Systems

  • 39. Modes
of
Shopping

  • 40. It
is
not
content,
but
context
that
will
maier
most
a
decade
or
so
from
now… Paul
Saffo,
InsDtute
for
the
Future
 Wired,
March
1994 

  • 41. It’s
the
Context,
Stupid
 
“The
scarce
resource
will
not
be
stuff,
but
 point
of
view...
 
The
future
belongs
to
neither
the
conduit
or
 content
players,
but
those
who
control
the
 filtering,
searching,
and
sense‐making
tools
 we
will
rely
on
to
navigate
through
the
 expanses
of
cyberspace.”
 (Saffo,
1994)

  • 42. Four questions for reflection and debate1.  Are
web
scale
discovery
tools
a
good
starDng
point
 for
subject
searches
or
for
exploring
new
topics?
2.  Will
such
tools
help
students
become
competent
 informaDon
users
in
the
work
place
and
later
life?
3.  Do
we
need
to
change
our
informaDon
literacy
 educaDon
to
fit
the
new
discovery
environment?
4.  Can
we
augment
our
discovery
services
to
support
 and
deliver
our
informaDon
literacy
mission?