Katy Swalwell Pedagogy Presentation
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Dr. Katy Swalwell's "Pedagogy: What Are Historical Texts" presentation for Power of Place Teaching American History, Summer 2012

Dr. Katy Swalwell's "Pedagogy: What Are Historical Texts" presentation for Power of Place Teaching American History, Summer 2012

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Katy Swalwell Pedagogy Presentation Katy Swalwell Pedagogy Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • Pedagogy:What Are HistoricalTexts?Katy Swalwell, Ph.D.George Mason UniversityJune 19, 2012
  • 1:00 – 4:30ObjectivesIntroductionsReading & Historical Thinking ReviewPractice SourcingBREAKReading & Digital Primary Source ReviewPractice Searching
  • ObjectivesDefine and practice historical thinkingInspire an idea for a “historical thinkingquestion” you would like your kids to wrestlewith /answerAnticipate challenges and possibilities withregards to engaging your students inhistorical thinkingBecome familiar with online historicalarchives
  • IntroductionsState your… NAME SCHOOL GRADE LEVEL If you could go back in time to witness one historical event for yourself, what would it be and why?
  • What is NOT “historical thinking”? Thinking that history is … GIVEN NEUTRAL INACCESSIBLE SYNONYMOUS WITH THE PAST
  • What IS “historical thinking”? Thinking that history is … EVOLVING CONSTRUCTED ACCESSIBLE DISTINCT FROM THE PAST Reading, analysis, and writing that is necessary to tell stories about the past. What do we know and how do we know what we know? Why do particular histories persist?
  • Historical “Binoculars” She was tired Rosa and wanted to sit down Parks Started the 195Arrested 5 sitting on a bus for Montgomery bus boycott
  • Source 1 (1954): “A letter sent to MayorGayle.” In Jo Ann Robinson’s TheMontgomery Bus Boycott and the WomenWho Started It. Knoxville: The University ofTennessee Press, 1987. p.viii. Available athttp://historicalthinkingmatters.org/rosaparks/1/sources/19/fulltext/Source 2 (1955): Abernathy, Ralph.“Recollection of the First MIA Mass Meeting.”In Daybreak of Freedom: The MontgomeryBus Boycott. Edited by Stewart Burns. ChapelHill, NC: The University of North CarolinaPress, 1997. pp. 93-95. Available athttp://historicalthinkingmatters.org/rosaparks/1/sources/22/fulltext/Source 3 (1955): Azbell, Joe. “5000 atMeeting Outline Boycott: Bullet Clips Bus.”Montgomery Advertiser.http://www.archives.state.al.us/teacher/rights/lesson1/doc2.htmlSource 4: Photo of ClaudetteColvinhttp://www.montgomeryboycott.com/img/biophotos/bio_colvin2.jpg
  • Historical “Binoculars” She was tired Rosa and wanted to sit down Parks Started the 195Arrested 5 sitting on a bus for Montgomery bus boycott
  • Historical “Binoculars” Leaders were unsure if boycottClaudette Colvin would work She was tired Rosa and wanted to sit down Parks Started the 195 Arrested 5 sitting on a bus for Montgomery bus boycott Consciously chosen as symbol for being JoAnn Robinson married, Christian, “respectable”
  • How do you teach historical thinking?DEVELOP A HISTORICAL QUESTIONSEEK OUT MULTIPLE PRIMARY ACCOUNTS &PERSPECTIVES TO ANSWER THE QUESTION“SOURCING”:Identify, Attribute, Judge Perspective, and AssessReliability(READ, QUESTION, CONTEXTUALIZE, andANALYZE) What does the source say? What did sources have to lose or gain by their accounts? For what audiences were the sources written? How are accounts similar different? (VanSledright, 2004)
  • Which of these steps is most complicated for you? Which of these steps is most complicated for your students?What makes it difficult to teach history this way? -- DEVELOP A HISTORICAL QUESTION -- SEEK OUT MULTIPLE PRIMARY SOURCES -- “SOURCE” THE SOURCES -- CONNECT CLAIMS WITH EVIDENCE
  • Let’s Practice…Foundations Course Questions:How have schools been segregated (by race)?What strategies have been tried to desegregateschools?Which strategies have been effective and why?Strategy: Court CasesExample: Brown v. the Board of EducationWhat was the response to the “Brown Decision” inVirginia?Watch Stacy Hoeflich in action, then complete TASK
  • Task One Review What claims do you think you could make? How did Virginia respond to the Brown decision? What was challenging about this task? Intriguing? New? Inadequate? Helpful? How would you adapt this activity for your students? How would you scaffold their historical thinking?-- DEVELOP A HISTORICAL QUESTION-- SEEK OUT MULTIPLE PRIMARY SOURCES-- “SOURCE” THE SOURCES
  • In grade level partners or small groups, discuss… What historical thinking do you want yourstudents to be able to do by the end of your unit/lesson?How should you appropriately scaffold each of the steps in historical thinking? What challenges do you anticipate?
  • How do computers and the Internet make teaching historical thinking easier?How do computers and the Internet make teaching historical thinking more challenging? (Eamon, 2006)
  • Task TWOIn grade level-alike groups, start to brainstormhistorical thinking questions that could guide yourstudents’ inquiry.Use the links under the Local Resources tab andthe Teaching American History Institute link at thebottom of this websitewww.elementarysocialstudies.weebly.comto begin searching for primary documents thatmay be appropriate for your historical questionsand students.If there is time, share a document you found withthe group and identify its scaffolding needs foruse with your students.
  • Questions? Email:katyswalwell@gmail.com