Shark Species In Coral Reefs   Brandon Roy
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Shark Species In Coral Reefs Brandon Roy

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Shark Species In Coral Reefs Brandon Roy Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Shark Species in Coral Reefs By: Brandon Roy
  • 2. Reef sharks (identification and classification )
    • Phylum: Chordata
    • Class: Chrondrichthyes
    • Diet : reef fish, lobster, cuttlefish, crabs,
    • Common sharks found in reefs
      • Black-tip reef shark
      • White-tip reef shark
      • Caribbean reef shark
      • Grey nurse shark
      • Whale shark
  • 3. Reef sharks cont.
    • Black-tip reef sharks have been found off the coast of Key West.
    • Tip of their dorsal fin is black, they have a brown body and can be up to 6 feet long.
    • They are one of the few sharks species who can jump completely out of the water.
    • White-tip reef shark have a white spot on the top of their dorsal fin with a grayish brown body(140-160 inches).
    • This species of shark is nocturnal and hunt in packs
  • 4. Unique characteristics of sharks
    • A tiger shark( grey nurse shark) can smell 1 drop of blood in an Olympic sized swimming pool
    • Whale shark is the largest fish in the world and can grow more than 15 ft long and live in coral reefs
    • All sharks have lateral lines down their body and face along with 2 spiracles behind their eyes that act as ears and detect vibrations in the water.
    • A sharks body is mostly composed of cartilage.
    • Most sharks eat 1-10% of their own body weight weekly.
  • 5. Why are reefs good homes for sharks?
    • The temperature rarely drops below 70 ° Fahrenheit, this temp is perfect for the cold blooded sharks.
    • Coral reefs are also home to over 500 species of fish that these sharks prey on.
    • The coral also provides shelter and protection from other sharks and fishing tourist.
    • The reefs also have very low levels of toxins in the water which is good for the reef sharks.
    • The constant changes in tide provide a very rich marine environment for the sharks
    • Estimates say that coral reefs contain up to 1/3 of the world’s population of fish.
  • 6. Threats to sharks in reefs
    • Over fishing – tourism and commercial fishing of sharks
      • Fins (shark fin soup)
      • Oils (Shark liver oil)
    • Sharks have slow reproduction so over fishing is hazardous
    • Oils from the liver are used for medical remedies (pains, sores, irritations)
    • The deterioration of coral reefs along with coral bleaching kills fish that sharks prey on
    • The fish trade is killing sharks to supply the demands of Chinese food industries
  • 7. Conservation of Reef Sharks
    • As mentioned in the previous slide, sharks are subject to over fishing. The IUCN, at one point, was responsible for banning all shark fishing in Australia.
      • After noticing that the number of sharks increased dramatically, the bans where lifted
    • Scientist are trying to come up with a way to improve the rate at which sharks reproduce.
    • Now the CITES are trying to ban fishing of tropical marine animals, in hopes of keeping some shark species from becoming endangered.
    • The CITES are also pushing to restrict the tourist fishing of certain shark species.
  • 8. Credits
    • Photos from
      • http://www.wikipedia.org/