Why Don't Students Like School - Ch 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
373
On Slideshare
348
From Embeds
25
Number of Embeds
1

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 25

http://whydontstudentslikeschool.wikispaces.com 25

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Chapter One Main Idea: - People are naturally curious, but we are not naturally good thinkers; unless the cognitive conditions are right, we will avoid thinking -
  • 2. Chapter One • People enjoy mental work if it is successful. People like to solve problems, but not to work on unsolvable problems. • When humans can get away with it, we don’t think. Instead we rely on memory. • Thinking occurs when you combine information (environment and long-term) in new ways. • Often, the information in the environment is not enough to solve a problem; we have to rely on information stored in long-term memory. Information from the environment is what is being presented to someone at that moment- could be information received while in class.
  • 3. • Working memory is where thinking occurs; similar to a “stage”. Working memory pulls information from the environment and from long-term memory to make a connection so that a person can “think”. • Thinking relies on: 1. information from the environment 2. facts in long-term memory 3. amount of space in working memory • Students need to have some kind of satisfaction when thinking – feeling of success.
  • 4. Classroom Implications: • Be sure there are problems to solve. - don’t just lecture • Respect students’ cognitive limits - differing background knowledge - don’t use too much info at once- crowd working memory • Clarify the problem to be solved - make material relevant - start with information you want them to know - consider key questions and frame correctly • Reconsider when to puzzle students - intrigue students at the beginning AND end of class
  • 5. • Accept and act on variation in students’ preparation - differentiate assignments based on where they are - are they prepared for class? • Change of pace - plan shifts for change to grab students’ attention • Keep a diary - keep track of what works!
  • 6. • Accept and act on variation in students’ preparation - differentiate assignments based on where they are - are they prepared for class? • Change of pace - plan shifts for change to grab students’ attention • Keep a diary - keep track of what works!