Objectives and success criteria
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Objectives and success criteria

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  • The aim of today’s session is to make sure that are all consistent in our use of LO’s. Focus points for ofsted is the use of lesson objectives in all lessons. At the moment we are not consistent with how we do this, we all use objectives in our own way but we are trying to make it clear, simple and easy to use on a daily basis.
  • 5 mintutes to discuss what you think is good, bad, useful, not useful on the examples
  • Lesson objectives and outcomes are nothing new, we are all doing it in lessons and have been for a long time. We have all been trained at different places, worked in many different schools and all read different articles about how and when LO’s should be used. Aim is to try and take away the confusion and develop a simple and easy way to mange the use in the classroom whille ticking the criteria for lesson observations and ofsted.
  • Key definitions
  • We need to be consistant – it makes life easier in the classroom, moves learning towards students and away from being teacher led and makes them all know what they are going to achieve in the end. Need to keep lokoing at the big picture – what do you want to get out of the pupils in the time that you have them for.
  • Despite building learning intentions into our planners, we are not good at sharing learning intentions and success criteria with our pupils. But at the same time, we want our pupils to be self-motivated, have a sense of purpose, etc. To give our pupils the tools they need to take more responsibility for their own learning and achieve greater learning independence, we need to communicate to them: what they are going to learn; why they should learn it in the first place; and how they will recognise when they have succeeded. Research shows that pupils who regularly receive this information in the classroom are: more focused for longer periods of time; more motivated; and better able to take responsibility for their own learning. Assessment for Learning, and particularly these first two steps in the process, immediately involves pupils with their own learning and offers opportunities for key interactions between pupils and teachers. These two elements of AfL are also important because if learners do not know what they are expected to learn and how to recognise their own success, then we cannot promote peer-/self-assessment, which are two other elements of AfL (to be covered in a later unit) as well as being important life skills.
  • Here are five steps to framing and delivering learning intentions. It is important that we: are clear and specific about learning intentions and the reasons why these are important things to learn; break down learning intentions and translate them into meaningful and manageable language; introduce and share learning intentions appropriately at beginning of the lesson; and structure lessons so the pupils can focus on and revisit the learning intention through approaches such as questioning, peer- and self-assessment, written and oral feedback and plenary sessions. But, we need to think about: How systematic have we been in doing this – particularly at the beginning of a lesson or activity? Are we writing or explaining intentions in language that pupils can understand? When we have presented learning intentions, have we tended to focus on what will be produced rather than what will be learned ?
  • Here are some examples of learning intentions. Look at the second example. What curricular context does it come from? (could come from any subject) Is it a useful skill to have in any context?
  • The next element in the Assessment for Learning process is the development of success criteria. If learning intentions spell out what the students will learn and why, the success criteria show pupils how to recognise success.
  • Establishing success criteria is an important part of Assessment for Learning for a number of reasons. First of all It improves pupils’ understanding by keeping them informed about how they will be assessed. This, in turn, empowers pupils because it involves them in their own performance and learning. In time, pupils who have experience of working to success criteria and contributing to the development of success criteria are more apt to take an independent approach to learning, as they understand how the criteria apply to their learning. They then are able to use these to assess their own achievements, address their own concerns and identify areas for improvement. Success criteria also allow you and the pupils to give accurate feedback – they keep you and the pupils focused on the criteria that the work will be assessed against.
  • So what are success criteria? What does success look like? Success criteria let pupils know if they have achieved the learning intention. They summarise the main teaching points ( key ingredients ) or processes ( key steps ) which link directly to the learning intention.
  • Here are some pupil benefits, which were identified by teachers involved in the NI Action Research Project, 2005 What about benefits to teachers? Do you see this process as having value to us? (Pause to allow comments, then move to next slide.)
  • Here are some of the teacher benefits as identified by teachers involved in the NI Action Research Project, 2005
  • Framework to use throughout the session to help and remind you of what to put down
  • Given out to staff and sorted
  • Link back to the objectives for the session – how far have we got, what do we need to do to finish?
  • In closing, here are a few key points to remember about Learning Intentions and Success Criteria.

Transcript

  • 1. OBJECTIVE SETTING AND SUCCESS CRITERIA
    • Learning Objective:
    • To identify opportunities for using learning intentions and success criteria in our own classroom.
    • To be able to identify and frame learning intentions and success criteria; and
    • To understand what learning intentions and success criteria are;
    • be able to identify and frame learning intentions and success criteria; and
    • Learning Outcomes:
    • By the end of this session, we will have:
    • understood the terms & the differences between them
    • achieved greater consistency in lesson planning through sharing learning objectives, learning outcomes & success criteria
    • improved lesson planning & clarity for pupils about:
          • - what they are learning and why,
          • - what is expected of them as an end product for assessment, &
          • - what the success criteria are – what will get good marks.
  • 2. Look at the different examples of lesson objectives and outcomes and discuss how effective they are.
  • 3.
    • In the beginning, there was ……... (Nothing much written …….. All in the head.)
    • Then there emerged … odd words (Macbeth Act 1 Sc 3)
    • Then there were aims & objectives (but no-one knew the difference)
    • And now………….. aims, objectives, learning outcomes, success criteria?
  • 4. Objectives
        • Teaching Objectives: Teacher language, from NC Frameworks or units of work
        • Learning Objectives: Pupil friendly language so they can understand and share responsibility for what they are going to learn
        • Learning Outcomes: End result, evidence that can be seen, assessed or measured (SMART like targets).
        • N.B. These can be expected (i.e. intended) or unexpected.
  • 5. The Golden Rule = Consistency
    • All teachers need to be consistent –
    • write up (or say) & explain
    • learning objectives, learning outcomes & success criteria
        • What we are going to learn in this lesson
        • What outcomes or end products are expected at the end – (these are likely to be assessed) &
        • The success criteria – what you expect in terms of quality - how pupils get good marks
  • 6. Why Are Learning Objectives and Success Criteria Important? © PMB 2007 ‘ If learners are to take more responsibility for their own learning, then they need to know what they are going to learn, how they will recognise when they have succeeded and why they should learn it in the first place.’ - (An Intro to AfL, Learning Unlimited, 2004) Learning Intentions ‘ What’ and ‘Why’ Success Criteria ‘ How to recognise success’
  • 7. Sharing Learning Objectives © PMB 2007
    • Identify what pupils will be learning (We are learning to…).
    • Explain the reason for the learning (This is because…).
    • Share (and sometimes negotiate) the learning and the reason with pupils at the beginning of the lesson or activity.
    • Present these in language that pupils can understand.
    • Revisit the learning intention throughout the activity/lesson.
  • 8. Defining the Learning Objective © PMB 2007
    • We are learning to…
    • - work effectively in groups.
    • - use evidence to draw conclusions.
    • - identify odd and even numbers.
  • 9. Success Criteria
    • Success Criteria
    • ‘ How to recognise success’
    © PMB 2007 Learning Objectives ‘ What’ and ‘Why’
  • 10. Why Are Success Criteria Important? © PMB 2007
    • Improve understanding
    • Empower pupils
    • Encourage independent learning
    • Enable accurate feedback
  • 11. What Are Success Criteria? © PMB 2007 ‘… success criteria summarise the key steps or ingredients the student needs in order to fulfil the learning intention – the main things to do, include or focus on.’ - Shirley Clarke
  • 12. Benefits for Pupils (Findings from N.I. Teacher Researchers) © PMB 2007 ‘ Children are more focused and interested, creating a positive learning culture. Their self-esteem is improving also.’ ‘ We have given children the vocabulary to discuss their own work.’ ‘ Success can now be achieved by all, even the weakest children!’ ‘ Pupils are beginning to talk more about how they are learning rather than what they are learning.’
  • 13. Benefits for Teachers (Findings from N.I. Teacher Researchers) © PMB 2007 ‘ Sharing learning intentions and success criteria at the beginning of the lessons has resulted in teacher and pupils working more in partnership towards a common goal.’ ‘ I’m more sensitive to individuals’ needs/achievements.’ ‘ Relationships between teacher and pupils are warmer and more positive.’ ‘ My planning is more effective/focused/ thoughtful.’
  • 14. Planning for Learning 1) Big Picture: The Purpose. What’s in it for everyone? Why bother? Where it fits? 3) Learning Objective(s): 1.To learn to… 2. To learn to…
    • 4) Learning Outcomes:
    • (specific, concrete and assessable - AfL)
    • By the end of this lesson, you will have:
    • read….
    • discussed….
    • completed…
    • written….
    • (past tense e.g. created, designed, played, made, learned, understood)
    2) Grand Aim: What’s in it for them? The reward? Teachers need to share these throughout so pupils know the quality of what is expected of them - precisely what gets good marks. 5) *Success Criteria
  • 15. What are these? Grand Aims, Learning Objectives, Learning Outcomes, Actions, or Resources?
    • 1 Grand Aim
    • 5 Learning Objectives
    • 4 Learning Outcomes (3 expected, 1 Unexpected)
    • 1 Action
    • 1 Resource
    • To learn how to check the rear view mirror
    • The Highway Code Book
    • Pass the driving test and obtain a driving licence
    • To learn to park in a marked space or bay
    • To learn how to reverse the car
    • Putting on the safety belt
    • Proper use of the rear view mirror
    • To learn about the importance of the Highway Code
    • Correct parking in a marked bay
    • Appropriate behaviour towards the examiner
    • To learn the road signs in the Highway Code
    • Correct execution of emergency stop
  • 16.
    • To learn how to check the rear view mirror - L Objective
    • The Highway Code Book - Resource
    • Pass the driving test & obtain a driving licence - Grand Aim
    • To learn to park in a marked space or bay - L Objective
    • To learn how to reverse the car - L Objective
    • Putting on the safety belt - Action or activity
    • Proper use of the rear view mirror - L Outcome (Exp)
    • To learn about the importance of the Highway Code - L Objective
    • Correct parking in a marked bay - L Outcome (Exp)
    • Appropriate behaviour towards the examiner - L Outcome (Unex)
    • To learn the road signs in the Highway Code - L Objective
    • Correct execution of emergency stop - L Outcome (Exp)
    What are these? Grand Aims, Learning Objectives, Learning Outcomes, Actions, or Resources?
  • 17. 1) Big Picture: Lesson objectives and success criteria
    • 2) Aim:
    • Improved learning through the consistent use of objectives-led, outcome focused, lesson planning
    • 3) Learning Objective:
    • To improve he use of lesson objectives through clearly defining & understanding the terms e.g. Aims, L Objs, L Outcomes etc.
    • 4) Learning Outcomes: By the end of this session, we will have:
    • understood the terms & the differences between them
    • achieved greater consistency in lesson planning through sharing
    • learning objectives, learning outcomes & success criteria
    • improved lesson planning & clarity for pupils about: - what they are learning and why,
    • - what is expected of them as an end product for assessment, &
    • - what the success criteria are – what will get good marks.
    5) Success Criteria: To do well in this session… What will get good marks… 1. Listen to explanations 2. Join in discussions 3. Take in key points 4. Adjust Planning
  • 18. Lesson Planning
    • Look through your planner at the lessons you are teaching this week.
    • Use the table to help you plan your week’s lessons;
        • - lesson objectives
      • - lesson outcomes
      • - success criteria
      • Swap your lesson planning with the person next to you ;
      • - they must look through them and annotate any changes they would make.
      • - Discuss this on your table
  • 19. Summary © PMB 2007
    • To take more responsibility for their own learning, pupils need to know:
    • what they are going to learn;
    • how they will recognise when they have succeeded; and
    • why they should learn it in the first place.
  • 20. Summary © PMB 2007
    • Using Learning Intentions and Success Criteria:
    • creates more self-motivated pupils;
    • empowers pupils to become independent learners;
    • improves understanding; and
    • can help focus feedback.
    • This isn’t all new
    • but we need to be more systematic about using these approaches in our classrooms.