Private and Confidential               ICT IN PROVINCIAL AND LOCAL                       GOVERNMENT                       ...
TABLE OF CONTENTS1.    INTRODUCTION .........................................................................................
3.2.    SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................... 363.3.    ICT P...
3.12.13.  ICT Skills .................................................................................... 56 3.13. PROVINC...
10.1.      TSM TECHNICALITIES ............................................................................. 10711.   THE W...
1.      Introduction1.1. BackgroundForgeAhead’s ongoing Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) inGovernment re...
This is achieved through exploring:        •     ICT Strategies and Policies        •     Current and future ICT budgets  ...
1.2.2.        South African Local Government AssociationThis Association focuses on developing proper strategies that Loca...
1.2.5.        GITOC (PGITO)The Government Information Technology Officers Council (GITOC) is involvedwith the investigatio...
1.3. Research ApproachThe information was gathered using structured ForgeAhead questionnaires thatwere sent via e-mail and...
1.4. Response Level1.4.1.           Provincial Government Province                               Universe                 ...
2.      Provincial Government Overview2.1. Policy and Regulatory EnvironmentGovernance is the process of decision-making a...
94                                  75                                                                      76            ...
2.2. ICT InfrastructureThis section reflects the ICT infrastructure utilised by the various provincialgovernment departmen...
In spite of the fact that 87% of the provincial departments are using theGovernment            Common        Core     Netw...
Infraco as well as implementing Digital Migration Strategy by 07 December 2007. About a half of provincial departments are...
2.2.3.                 Software in the DepartmentsThe 2006/7 ForgeAhead study focused on the usage of Open Source Software...
2.1.3b.     Server Operating SystemThe majority of the provincial departments (71% of respondents) are usingWindows 2003. ...
2.1.4.            Mobile TechnologyThere is strong evidence that mobile technologies could be instrumental inaddressing go...
cell phone users is approximately 20 million, which is about 45% of thepopulation. In order to send and receive informatio...
2.1.4b.     Case StudiesThere are case studies of success locally, on the use of Mobile SMS.2.1.4b (i)          GPGMotoris...
SMS by sending their student numbers and ID numbers to the advertisednumbers.The use of cell phone technologies by governm...
2.1.5.               Skills and ServicesBoth the government and the private sector have recognised the invaluable rolethat...
Many organisations have a Business Analyst, whose role is sometimes referredto as, or combined with that of a System Analy...
2.1.6.                Outsourcing in the Provincial GovernmentFor a department to function efficiently and to offer qualit...
2.1.7.           Information and e-Security2.1.7a.          Security Technologies/MethodsInformation security is a signifi...
2.1.7b.           Common Security Policies used by the department                                      Anti-virus         ...
2.1.8.            Future ICT InvestmentsAccording to ForgeAhead’s 2008 ICTs in Government Research, a large part ofthe R3 ...
2.1.8b.       Bandwidth ExtensionThe future Investment graph also indicates that departments are facing an ever-increasing...
2.1.9.                   ICT ProjectsIn   the             2008   ForgeAhead     ICT                   in   Government     ...
is motivated by the need to address the instabilities of the current network andproductive assets that can be used for oth...
•   Business processes analysis   •   Production of an inventory of government information systems   •   Analysis of skill...
2.1.9b.        Completed ICT projectsThe 35% completed ICT projects that the departments have reported includesthe followi...
3.       Provincial Departments Overview3.1. HealthThere is an obvious need to bring ICT connectivity to the South African...
•   System Upgrade (HIS)    •   DB (Oracle) Upgrade    •   LAN Upgrade (GITOC)    •   DR George Makhuri (LAN)    •   Natal...
3.1.4.            General ICT Trends in HealthAll of the Provincial Health Departments that responded to the study aresupp...
3.2. Social DevelopmentA common challenge facing Social Development departments is accessibility bypeople for assistance. ...
3.3. ICT Projects3.3.1.        Completed ICT ProjectsThe Social departments have reported the following 13 successful ICT ...
3.3.3.            ICT Future InvestmentThe Social Development cluster is gearing to make major investments in thefollowing...
3.4. EducationAdvances in ICTs globally are rapidly expanding learning opportunities andaccess to educational resources be...
3.4.1b.    Current Projects    • ICASA connecting 540 schools    •   CSIR 25 Digital Doorway Systems    •   Upgrade Networ...
3.5. TreasuryAbout five treasury departments across the country have reported approximately25 ICT Projects that include bo...
3.5.3.        ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial Treasury departments are:    •   VoIP (4 departme...
3.6. Office of the Premier3.6.1.         ICT Project in the Premiers’ OfficeOf the 19 ICT projects reported by seven Offic...
3.6.2.        ICT BudgetThe provincial OTPs ICT budget is R127 million, which is 7% of the total ICTbudget in the provinci...
3.7. Public Works, Roads & Transport3.7.1.              ICT ProjectsOut of 21 ICT projects reported by the Public Works, R...
3.8. Local Government and Housing3.8.1.               ICT ProjectsTwenty-nine percent of the reported ICT projects within ...
3.8.2.               ICT BudgetThe        combined/reported               ICT    budget    for   Local   Government       ...
3.9.2.             ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial Agriculture departments are:        •   Acqu...
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Ict provincial-and-local-government
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Ict provincial-and-local-government

1,792

Published on

more info on lgict.org.za

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,792
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
27
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Ict provincial-and-local-government

  1. 1. Private and Confidential ICT IN PROVINCIAL AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT NATIONAL OVERVIEW 2008COPYRIGHT: 2008/9 ICT in Government - ForgeAhead
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................... 5 1.1. BACKGROUND ...........................................................................................5 1.2. STAKEHOLDERS .........................................................................................6 1.2.1. Department of Provincial & Local Government .......................................6 1.2.2. South African Local Government Association .........................................7 1.2.3. Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) .......................................7 1.2.4. State Information Technology Agency (SITA) ........................................7 1.2.5. GITOC (PGITO) ................................................................................8 1.2.6. Private Sector ..................................................................................8 1.3. RESEARCH APPROACH ..................................................................................9 1.4. RESPONSE LEVEL ..................................................................................... 10 1.4.1. Provincial Government..................................................................... 10 1.4.2. Local Government ........................................................................... 102. PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT OVERVIEW............................................................................. 11 2.1. POLICY AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT .......................................................... 11 2.2. ICT INFRASTRUCTURE ............................................................................... 13 2.2.1. Forms of Connectivity ...................................................................... 13 2.2.2. INTERNET AND E-MAIL CONNECTIVITY ............................................................. 15 2.2.3. Software in the Departments ............................................................ 16 2.1.3a. Financial System .......................................................................... 16 2.1.3b. Server Operating System .............................................................. 17 2.1.3c. Server Operating System .............................................................. 17 2.1.3d. e-Mail Client ................................................................................ 17 2.1.4. Mobile Technology .......................................................................... 18 2.1.4a. Cell Phone ................................................................................... 18 2.1.4b. Case Studies ............................................................................... 20 2.1.5. Skills and Services .......................................................................... 22 2.1.6. Outsourcing in the Provincial Government .......................................... 24 2.1.7. Information and e-Security .............................................................. 25 2.1.7a. Security Technologies/Methods ...................................................... 25 2.1.7b. Common Security Policies used by the department ........................... 26 2.1.8. Future ICT Investments ................................................................... 27 2.1.8a. Acquisition of New Hardware ......................................................... 27 2.1.8b. Bandwidth Extension .................................................................... 28 2.1.8c. Voice over Internet Protocol .......................................................... 28 2.1.8d. Data Warehousing ........................................................................ 28 2.1.8e. System Integration ...................................................................... 28 2.1.9. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 29 2.1.9a. Current ICT Projects in the departments .......................................... 29 2.1.9b. Completed ICT projects................................................................. 32 2.1.9c. Delayed and Failed ICT Projects ..................................................... 323. PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENTS OVERVIEW ........................................................................... 33 3.1. HEALTH ................................................................................................ 33 3.1.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 33 3.1.1a. Completed ICT projects................................................................. 33 3.1.1b. Current ICT Projects ..................................................................... 34 3.1.2. ICT Budget in Health Cluster ............................................................ 34 3.1.3. Future ICT Investment .................................................................... 34 3.1.4. General ICT Trends in Health ............................................................ 35 3.1.5. Plans/Policies/Other Technologies...................................................... 35 1-119
  3. 3. 3.2. SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT ............................................................................... 363.3. ICT PROJECTS ........................................................................................ 37 3.3.1. Completed ICT Projects ................................................................... 37 3.3.1b. Current ICT Projects ..................................................................... 37 3.3.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 37 3.3.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 38 3.3.4. Policies/Plans/Other Technologies...................................................... 383.4. EDUCATION............................................................................................ 39 3.4.1. ICT Projects........................................................................................ 39 3.4.1a. Completed ICT Projects ................................................................. 39 3.4.1b. Current Projects ........................................................................... 40 3.4.1c Delayed ICT Project ...................................................................... 40 3.4.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 40 3.4.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 403.5. TREASURY ............................................................................................. 41 3.5.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 41 3.5.1a. Completed ICT Projects ................................................................. 41 3.5.1b. Current Projects ........................................................................... 41 3.5.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 41 3.5.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 423.6. OFFICE OF THE PREMIER ............................................................................. 43 3.6.1. ICT Project in the Premiers’ Office ..................................................... 43 3.6.1a. Current ICT projects include: ......................................................... 43 3.6.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 44 3.6.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 443.7. PUBLIC WORKS, ROADS & TRANSPORT ............................................................ 45 3.7.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 45 3.7.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 45 3.7.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 453.8. LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND HOUSING ............................................................... 46 3.8.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 46 3.8.2. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 47 3.8.3. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 47 3.9.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 47 3.9.2. ICT Future Investment .................................................................... 483.10. ECONOMIC AFFAIRS .................................................................................. 48 3.10.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 483.11. SPORT, RECREATION, ART, CULTURE & TOURISM ................................................ 49 3.11.1. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 493.12. SHARED SERVICES CENTRES ........................................................................ 49 3.12.1. Some of the Checklist for Shared Service Centre ................................. 50 3.12.2. Research Findings ........................................................................... 50 3.12.3. Gauteng Shared Services (GSSC) ...................................................... 51 3.12.4. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 51 3.12.5. Infrastructure ................................................................................. 51 3.12.6. Future Investment .......................................................................... 51 3.12.7. ICT Skills ....................................................................................... 52 3.12.8. Centre for e-Innovation ................................................................... 52 3.12.8a. CEI - Economic/Governance and Administration ............................... 52 3.1.8b. CEI - Education/Culture and Sport: Overview ................................... 53 3.12.8c. CEI - Health/Social Services and Housing: Overview ......................... 53 3.12.8d. CEI - Planning and Development: Overview ..................................... 54 3.12.8e. CEI - Policy and Strategy: Overview ............................................... 54 3.12.8f. CEI - Transversal GITO: Overview .................................................. 55 3.12.9. ICT Budget .................................................................................... 55 3.12.10. Infrastructure .............................................................................. 56 3.12.12. Future Investment ....................................................................... 56 2-119
  4. 4. 3.12.13. ICT Skills .................................................................................... 56 3.13. PROVINCIAL DEPARTMENTS’ ICT BUDGETS ....................................................... 57 3.13.1. ICT Provincial Budget Projections ...................................................... 574. MUNICIPALITIES - BACKGROUND ......................................................................................... 60 4.1. UNDERSTANDING THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT CONTEXT ........................................... 60 4.2. LOCAL GOVERNMENT SCALE, STRUCTURE & SEGMENTATION ................................... 63 4.2.1. Metropolitan Municipalities .............................................................. 63 4.2.2. Local Municipalities ......................................................................... 64 4.2.3. District Municipalities....................................................................... 645. LOCAL GOVERNMENT OVERVIEW ........................................................... 66 5.1. POLICY AND REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT .......................................................... 66 5.2. ICT INFRASTRUCTURE................................................................................ 68 5.2.1. Forms of Connectivity ...................................................................... 68 5.2.1a. LGNET ........................................................................................ 69 5.2.2. Software Infrastructure ................................................................... 71 5.2.2a. Financial System .......................................................................... 71 5.2.2b. Risk Management......................................................................... 71 5.2.2c. Anti-virus .................................................................................... 72 5.2.2d. Firewalls ..................................................................................... 72 5.2.2e. Geographic Information System (GIS)............................................. 72 5.2.3. Skills Demand, Retention & Outsourcing............................................. 73 5.2.3a. Outsourcing in the Provincial Government........................................ 73 5.2.3b. Skills Retention in the Municipalities................................................ 74 5.2.3c. Outsourcing in the Local Government .............................................. 75 5.2.4. Information security ........................................................................ 76 5.3. FUTURE ICT INVESTMENTS .......................................................................... 78 5.3.1. Reviewing the Top 8 Future Investment List ....................................... 79 5.3.1a. Financial System and Database System ........................................... 79 5.3.1b. Integration Software .................................................................... 79 5.3.1c. Acquisition of New Hardware ......................................................... 79 5.3.1d. Call Centre .................................................................................. 80 5.3.1e. Data Warehousing ........................................................................ 80 5.3.4. ICT Projects ................................................................................... 81 5.3.5. ICT BUDGET .................................................................................. 82 5.3.5a. Budget Caution ............................................................................ 82 5.3.5b. Municipal ICT budgets................................................................... 82 5.3.5c. ICT Local Government Budget Projections........................................ 846. SUMMARY OF THE TRENDS ..................................................................... 85 6.1. PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT .......................................................................... 85 6.2. LOCAL GOVERNMENT ................................................................................. 877. KEY TRENDS ......................................................................................................................................... 898. CHALLENGES FACING THE GOVERNMENT ......................................................................... 909. RECOMMENDATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 91 9.1. Budgetary and Resources Constraints ............................................. 91 9.2. Facing Insufficient Levers for Scale ................................................. 91 9.3. Failure to Attract and Retain Skills .................................................. 92 9.4. Putting ICTs on the Local Government Agenda ................................. 92 9.5. Establishment of a National Local Government ICT Forum .................. 93 9.6. Other Recommendations ............................................................... 9310. MUNICIPALITIES INDEX (TSM) ............................................................................................... 94 3-119
  5. 5. 10.1. TSM TECHNICALITIES ............................................................................. 10711. THE WAY FORWARD ...................................................................................................................... 10812. COMPARATIVE INDEX .................................................................................................................. 109 12.1. GOVERNANCE RATING.............................................................................. 109 12.2. INFORMATION SECURITY PROVINCIAL INDEX .................................................... 110 12.2.1. Security Technologies/Methods ....................................................... 110 12.2.2. Common Security Policies Used by Departments ............................... 111 12.3. SKILLS RETENTION RATINGS ...................................................................... 113 12.4. ACCESS TECHNOLOGY COMPARISON (DEPARTMENTS) ......................................... 115 12.5. ACCESS TECHNOLOGY COMPARISON (MUNICIPALITIES) ....................................... 116 12.6. FUTURE INVESTMENT COMPARISON (DEPARTMENTS) .......................................... 117 12.6.1. Acquisition of New Hardware .......................................................... 118 12.6.2. System Integration ....................................................................... 118 12.6.3. Bandwidth Extension ..................................................................... 118 12.6.4. Voice Over Internet Protocol ........................................................... 118 12.6.5. Data Warehousing ........................................................................ 118 12.7. Future Investment Comparison (Municipalities) .................................... 119 4-119
  6. 6. 1. Introduction1.1. BackgroundForgeAhead’s ongoing Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) inGovernment research programme is the product of an increasingly strongercollaboration and interaction between ForgeAhead and the three South Africanspheres of government, namely National Government, Provincial Governmentand Local Government (Municipalities).The last decade has placed growing emphasis on the demand for service deliveryand all government spheres are striving for service delivery excellence. Thevalue of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) as a keycontributor to meeting these demands has been realised and its potential forenhancing and fast tracking service delivery is unquestionable.This ICT report concentrates only on two spheres - Provincial Government andLocal Government. ForgeAhead’s ICT in Provincial Government research wasconceptualised in 2001, while the ICT research into local government wasintroduced in 2004. This study has grown extensively in credibility and contentvalue year on year, and the ICT in Government research as whole is todayconsidered to be a reliable source of information on ICT trends and it providesICT information to both the public and private sectors.The aim of ForgeAhead’s ICTs in Provincial and Local Government Research is toprovide a succinct understanding of the status and use of ICTs in provincialdepartments, metropolitan, district and local municipalities. It also highlights therole of ICTs in enhancing service delivery.2008 ICT in Government Report 5-119
  7. 7. This is achieved through exploring: • ICT Strategies and Policies • Current and future ICT budgets • Current Infrastructure • ICT Projects • Future Investment • Outsourcing models • Skills required in the public sector • Vendor Usage/Competitor analysis1A further aim of the ICTs in Provincial & Local Government Research is toprovide cutting edge information that is intended to facilitate better coordinationbetween Provincial and Local Government structures as well as other relevantstakeholders.1.2. Stakeholders1.2.1. Department of Provincial & Local GovernmentAs a national department, the function of the DPLG is to develop national policiesand legislation pertaining to Provincial and Local Government. The DPLG alsomonitors the implementation of the following: • Intergovernmental Relation Framework (IGR) • Municipal Property Rates • Municipal Finance Management Act • Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework • Disaster Management Act • Municipal Structure Act • Municipal System Act • Municipal Demarcation ActAnother function of the DPLG is to support provinces and local government infulfilling their constitutional and legal obligations.1 For Separate Report on Competitor analyses contact ForgeAhead2008 ICT in Government Report 6-119
  8. 8. 1.2.2. South African Local Government AssociationThis Association focuses on developing proper strategies that Local Governmentsto address their challenges. Its ICT mandate is to assess the current strategiesfor the use of ICTs and to promote their use in Local Governments.1.2.3. Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA)The DBSA provides funding for infrastructure and human resources developmentas well as capacity building for municipalities. Through the DBSA DevelopmentFund, grants and loans are allocated to Local Government for infrastructuredevelopment depending on certain qualifying criteria.A major current initiative is the LGNet project that aims to connect LocalGovernments to a central Resource Centre (LGRC) that will provide municipalstaff with access to information and promote an environment of knowledgesharing.1.2.4. State Information Technology Agency (SITA)SITA is mandated to provide support services on ICTs, and procure ICTapplications, systems, products and services for all levels of Government.Currently, this agency is undergoing various structural changes and is looking toextend its services from National and Provincial Government to include LocalGovernment. Within the Local Government sphere, SITA currently providesnetworks and support. In their presentation in 2006, SITA pledged to becomemore interactive and work more closely with Local Governments.2008 ICT in Government Report 7-119
  9. 9. 1.2.5. GITOC (PGITO)The Government Information Technology Officers Council (GITOC) is involvedwith the investigation, formulation and development of IT security policyframework, e-government policy and strategy as well as IT procurementguidelines. GITOC is also involved in the effort to monitor IT projects ingovernment to eliminate duplication. For example, the Inventory ofGovernment-wide Information Systems (IGIS) report was completed in 2001and regulations like MIOS seek to enforce inter-operability across architectures,software solutions and security issues. The provincial GITOs (PGITO) arerepresented at GITOC.1.2.6. Private SectorPrivate Sector’s expertise is critical in complex IT Public Private Partnerships(PPPs) in South Africa, particularly in both Provincial and Local Governmentspheres. PPPs enable the use of more extensive emerging technology to providebetter ICT services, which in turn improves government’s service delivery.2008 ICT in Government Report 8-119
  10. 10. 1.3. Research ApproachThe information was gathered using structured ForgeAhead questionnaires thatwere sent via e-mail and fax. Some questionnaires were sent back electronicallywhile other questionnaires were collected through both face-to-face andtelephonic methods. All data was then edited, coded, captured and analysed atForgeAhead.Collectively, the sample/respondents consisted of CIOs, IT Managers,Deputy/Assistant/Acting Managers, Knowledge/Project Managers, DeputyDirectors, Chief Education Specialists, Network Engineers, Assistant Directors, ITDirectors, System Analysts, Principal Data Technologists, Senior AdministrationOfficers and a Senior Corporate Services Manager.The fieldwork was conducted between February and September 2008.2008 ICT in Government Report 9-119
  11. 11. 1.4. Response Level1.4.1. Provincial Government Province Universe Frequency % Eastern Cape 12 11 92% Free State 10 10 100% Gauteng 12 10 83% KwaZulu-Natal 14 12 86% Limpopo 10 10 100% Mpumalanga 10 10 100% North West 11 11 100% Northern Cape 11 7 64% Western Cape 12 12 100% Total 102 97 91%Table 1: Sample for Provincial GovernmentsThe data gathered in this report was collected from 102 departments across 9provincial government departments. The response rate for ProvincialGovernment was 91% with a notable increase of 19% compared to the previousyear’s response rate (2005/6 study).1.4.2. Local Government PROVINCE UNIVERSE 2006/7 % PROVINCE EASTERN CAPE 46 36 78% FREE STATE 25 21 84% GAUTENG 14 14 100% KwaZulu-Natal 60 48 80% LIMPOPO 30 28 93% MPUMALANGA 21 17 81% NORTHERN CAPE 32 23 72% NORTH WEST 25 21 84% WESTERN CAPE 30 27 90% TOTAL 283 235 83%Table 2: Sample for Local GovernmentsThe survey covered the local governments in the 9 provinces of South Africa and235 municipalities were covered, resulting in a response rate of 83%, which isan increase of 12% from the 2005/6 rate.2008 ICT in Government Report 10-119
  12. 12. 2. Provincial Government Overview2.1. Policy and Regulatory EnvironmentGovernance is the process of decision-making and implementation, ensuringtransparency, responsibility, accountability and fiduciary compliance. It shouldbe actively pursued at all government levels to minimise mismanagement andcorruption and thereby enhance effective service delivery. To enable goodgovernance in government, there should be appropriate policies in place that areaimed at creating a legislative framework for effective use of provincialresources. For the purposes of this section, e-governance is interpreted as theapplication of governance within the context of ICTs and ICT usage bygovernment.In carrying out the ICT usage survey in provincial government, ForgeAheadseeks to establish whether the departments have put in place various policies,strategies and plans that are part of the governance model. Specifically, theseindicators are: • Procurement/Tender Policy • ICT Strategy • ICT Steering Committee • Master Systems Plan • BEE Policy • Open Source Software Policy • Skills Development Plan • Disaster Recovery Plan • Security Policy • e-Government Policy/Strategy2008 ICT in Government Report 11-119
  13. 13. 94 75 76 69 69 64 60 58 43 19 Government DRP ICT Strategy Development Open Source Security ICT Steering Procurement Systems Plan BEE Policy Committee Policy ICT Skills Software Policy Master Policy Policy Plan Plan e- +5% +6% +8% +8% +33 +30 Figure 1: Positive Responses to Existence of Relevant Plans and PoliciesThe above graph shows the positive responses to the existence of the relevantplans and policies from the respondents in various provincial governmentdepartments, as a percentage of the total respondents.In the previous ForgeAhead report we pointed out a very low score, whichincluded the Security area, which would indicate an unacceptable risk ofprovincial departments’ systems, creating an opportunity for the departments tofall victim to viruses or other forms of electronic attack. However, according tothe 2008 survey, Security Policy is among significant areas of improvement thatalso include ICT Skills Development plan, Disaster Recovery Plan and ICTStrategy.Open Source Software (OSS) and e-Government are at the bottom of the list interms of ICT policies and strategies. Although these are becoming increasinglyrecognised in e-Governance, OSS and e-Government are on the radar of only 43percent and 19 percent of departments respectively.2008 ICT in Government Report 12-119
  14. 14. 2.2. ICT InfrastructureThis section reflects the ICT infrastructure utilised by the various provincialgovernment departments. Access to infrastructure and services is a critical factorin delivering services relevant to combating poverty, raising standards of livingand creating the conditions for economic activity. The ICT infrastructure that isused by the provincial government includes hardware; software; Internet and e-mail access; and network infrastructure.2.2.1. Forms of ConnectivityAccess to Internet and e-Mail is aimed at making employees work moreefficiently. Despite the recognised potential benefits to the departments, accessto these technologies is still restricted to certain individuals. % SITA Netw ork/GCCN 87 1 88 Wireless Broadband 30 29 59 VPN (Virtual Private Netw ork) 12 47 59 Cellular netw orks 53 2 55 Lease Line (Diginet) 47 1 48 Dial-up 39 39 ISDN 34 1 35 ADSL 33 1 34 Satellite communications 15 17 32 Access currently To be aquired Figure 2: Responses on access technologiesIn response to various Provincial Departments’ requirements, the GovernmentCommon Co-Network (GCCN) was established to connect the departments’ sites.These connections enable officials to access financial and non-financial systemssuch as Basic Accounting System (BAS), Logistic Information System (LOGIS),Personnel and Salary system (PERSAL), the Internet and email.2008 ICT in Government Report 13-119
  15. 15. In spite of the fact that 87% of the provincial departments are using theGovernment Common Core Network (GCCN), SITA is working towardsimplementing a Next Generation Network (NGN) that will replace the currentGCCN. The reason to change GCCS is motivated by the ‘ever increasing users’ 2demands for more advance services.In close cooperation with SITA, Eastern Cape Provincial staff undertook a studytour to the USA to look for the most suitable solution for the provincial ICTInfrastructure called Provincial Common Core Network (PCCN) to address theinstability of the Government Common Core Network that has been plaguing thesystem3. Next Generation Network is expected to improve citizens experiencethrough initiatives such as: • e-Education through the Further Education Training (FET) colleges Virtual Private Network Project • Telemedicine through the e-Health projects with access to clinics, etc • Connectivity to Multi-Purpose Community centres (Thusong Centres) • Creating a stable communications platform for all departments to utilise in the execution of their citizen-centric operations, strengthening collaboration between various tiers of government.The need for information kiosks aimed at giving local residents information ongovernment services and economic empowerment options is driving theprovincial government department to invest in wireless broadband. 37% ofprovincial departments have reported accessing technology via wirelessbroadband and a further 29% will acquire this form of access technology.The trend of Wireless Broadband technology is expected to increase as (DOC)and National Treasury (NT) have finalised outstanding matters concerning therole of Sentech in wireless broadband for government services, prioritisinghealth, education, and the provision of connectivity for the Post Office. Accordingto the Governments Programme of Action 2008 the government will increaseaccess to ICT infrastructure by rolling out Sentech Wireless Broadband and2 23 May 2007 Keynote address by MDPSA3 Policy Speech of vote 1; Office of the Premier of the Eastern Cape; 14 March 20072008 ICT in Government Report 14-119
  16. 16. Infraco as well as implementing Digital Migration Strategy by 07 December 2007. About a half of provincial departments are gearing for Virtual Private Network (VPN) as this form of connectivity is perceived to be offering data communications efficiency and cost-effectiveness. 2.2.2. Internet and e-Mail Connectivity Internal access of Internet and e-mail is aimed at making employees work much easier, faster and more efficient. For instance, with e-mail one can get in touch with any employee in the department – at any time. In addition to this, one can view all the employees’ diaries on the system. This is saving employees the effort of sending physical printouts every day or week. Despite the above- mentioned benefit to the departments, access to these technologies is still restricted to certain individuals. The following graphs illustrate the PCs/Laptops users supported by the departments and the access to Internet and e-Mails within the departments: Number of PC/Laptops Percentage connected to internet & Email Less than 50 33 Betw een 10 - 20% 7 3 4 Betw een 51 - 100 14 Betw een 21 - 30% 9 1 10 Betw een 101 - 200 23 9 Betw een 31 - 40% 20 Betw een 201 - 300 8 9 Betw een 41 - 50% 3 5 15 Betw een 301 - 400 4 Betw een 51 - 70% 11 4 12 Betw een 401 - 500 6 Betw een 71 - 80% 13 14 17Betw een 501 - 1000 Betw een 81 - 99% 24 3 43 100% 24 More than 1000 8 46 PC Laptop Intenert Emails Figure 3: PC/Laptops supported by departments and Internet & e-Mail connectivity rate The majority (43%) of the provincial departments support more than 1 000 PC users and 24% of the departments’ PC users have 100% access to the Internet. E-mail access rate to PC is much higher compared to Internet as 46% of the departments reported 100% access to e-mails. 2008 ICT in Government Report 15-119
  17. 17. 2.2.3. Software in the DepartmentsThe 2006/7 ForgeAhead study focused on the usage of Open Source Software– as the South African Government has approved a free and open sourcestrategy (FOSS) and the government is expected to migrate its currentsoftware to free and open source software. The cabinet approved the FOSSstrategy as it is expected, among other things, that it will lower administrationcosts and enhance local IT skills. In future, government departments are toincorporate FOSS in their planning.The results reveal that as many as 51% of the provincial departments arelargely using Linux open source software), while a further 20% will acquireOSS.2.1.3a. Financial SystemThe table below shows the software that the departments are using for FinancialSystem: Financial ACCPAC PERSAL PASTEL System FINEST Walker LOGIS MATE TEAM BAS FMS SAP Eastern Cape 9 5 6 Free State 8 6 1 2 Gauteng 7 2 6 KZN 11 4 1 1 Limpopo 8 3 7 Mpumalanga 10 1 1 North West 2 2 10 3 Northern Cape 7 2 1 1 Western Cape 12 Total 72 19 7 17 7 1 2 1 10 3 Total Percentage 77% 20% 8% 18% 8% 1% 2% 1% 11% 3%Table 3: Represents financial software in the departmentsAs expected, the majority of the provincial departments are using BAS, Pearsaland Logis, which are GCCN financial components. The Gauteng departmentlargely uses SAP financial system as they have a bigger ICT budget, which canafford such technology. North West province is still discussing with SITA onpossible migration to GCCN. Currently the departments are using the WalkerFinancial System.2008 ICT in Government Report 16-119
  18. 18. 2.1.3b. Server Operating SystemThe majority of the provincial departments (71% of respondents) are usingWindows 2003. Novell/Netware is used by 31% of the departments and a further20% of the departments have reported using the Linux Operating System.2.1.3c. Server Operating SystemThe provincial departments are using Access for database (reported by 71% ofrespondents). A further 36% of the departments have indicated that they useSQL in querying and retrieving information from databases.2.1.3d. e-Mail ClientThe E-mail client applications used to send, receive and view e-mail by thedepartments include: • Outlook (reported by 49% of respondents) • Groupwise (45%) • Exchange (11%)2008 ICT in Government Report 17-119
  19. 19. 2.1.4. Mobile TechnologyThere is strong evidence that mobile technologies could be instrumental inaddressing government’s slow response rates to citizens’ requests, poor accessto services, particularly in under-serviced rural areas and limited ability ofcitizens to provide feedback on services, as well as raising other issues ofconcern. The survey therefore investigated the services/application usedinternally within the provincial government departments. 3G Wireless 84 Technology Cell Phones 78 Intranet 73 SMS Technologies 42 PDA 37 VoIP 26 Figure 4: Other technologies utilised by the departments2.1.4a. Cell PhoneThe research suggests that departments have in the past used an SP for thesupply of mobile telephones on a contract basis to officials only. The trend nowis expanding to incorporate larger part of government staffs. The super-fast nextgeneration of cellular networks, known as 3G (third generation), make itpossible to get full Internet access via mobile devices such as cell phones, PDAsand Notebook Computers.The continued growth of cell phones and SMS usage by members of the publicprovides an opportunity for government to use SMS technology as a medium tointeract with the public. Currently, the findings reveal a high number ofprovincial departments using mobile technology.However, one is compelled to ask whether these technologies are being utilisedby the departments to serve the citizens. Estimates indicate that the number of2008 ICT in Government Report 18-119
  20. 20. cell phone users is approximately 20 million, which is about 45% of thepopulation. In order to send and receive information in a fast and cost effectiveway SMS is far ahead of e-mail in terms of usage by the public. South Africaexperiences high levels of inequalities, owing to its historical background. Thesocio–economic fabric is such that most previously disadvantaged people areunable to access government services. Government relies mostly on itsdepartments and offices to render services to the public, which is a barrier inthat interaction with government can only be physical.Citizens generally initiate interaction with government, and are only able toreceive what is available through pre-determined processes. For citizens in areasthat are remote and lack basic infrastructure, access to government services isseverely limited. Citizens have to incur the costs of travelling long distances toreach service points in local towns.The uptake of the mobile phone SMS facility will not only provide easy access togovernment services but will also reduce fraud as a result of criminal activitiesand corruption, improve citizens’ interaction with government and thusimproving customer relations.Citizens will not have to queue to enquire about their applications. For example,after applying for an ID, an applicant will not have to physically come to therelevant government department to enquire until they receive an SMS notifyingthem that their application has been processed and their ID book is ready forcollection. If the applicant needs to know at any point in time the status of theirapplication, they can just query via the cell phone and receive an instant SMSwith the status response.44 E-Mzanzi Information Society ; 2nd Issue June 20072008 ICT in Government Report 19-119
  21. 21. 2.1.4b. Case StudiesThere are case studies of success locally, on the use of Mobile SMS.2.1.4b (i) GPGMotorists were receiving short cell phone and multimedia messages with mapsfrom the call centre on temporary closure of roads due to Gautrain construction.5For the City of Johannesburg traffic fine system, motorists around Johannesburgare now be able to find out if they have outstanding traffic fines, summonses orwarrants of arrest through an SMS. All they need to do is send their ID numbersvia an SMS to 36997 from any network. Motorists will then receive a notificationwith their contact details recorded on a data system.2.1.4b (ii) Municipality Structures ActThe key elements of the PMS model are: • Customer: Evaluation of performance • Corporate: Performance management • Staff: Individual performance managementA “dashboard” monitoring tool is used on an ongoing basis. ICT technology, e.g.SMS is used to communicate with the responsible officials and councillors.6 TheProvincial M&E Electronic System/Stratmaster that was developed internallyusing Open Source Software (OSS) will be rolled out across ProvincialDepartments as well as extending to Local Government and Municipalities, usinge-mail and SMS notifications.2.1.4b (iii) e-ImbizoSITA has finalised a customer-relations portal for government, which will beknown as the e-Imbizo. This portal will also allow people to send an SMS to theDepartment of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) about challenges ofservice delivery in all government departments or spheres.The Department of Education (DOE) Matric results delivery via SMS system givesMatric students the option of accessing their results using a cell phone ratherthan the traditional newspapers method. Students could query their results via5 Gauteng Online; published date 12/12/20066 IMFO Conference 20062008 ICT in Government Report 20-119
  22. 22. SMS by sending their student numbers and ID numbers to the advertisednumbers.The use of cell phone technologies by government departments through SMS,3G, VoIP is expected to rise. Twenty-six percent of the departments arecurrently using VoIP, while a further 56% is gearing to invest on VoIPtechnology.2008 ICT in Government Report 21-119
  23. 23. 2.1.5. Skills and ServicesBoth the government and the private sector have recognised the invaluable rolethat information and communication technology (ICT) plays in responding tonational socio-economic imperatives. The importance of ICT skills to theeconomic, social and political trajectory in a globalised context cannot thereforebe over-emphasised. The potential of, and limitations to, intermediate-level ICTskills in so far as they contribute to South Africa’s human resource capacity isconsidered essential to the current form and future trajectory of the country’sdevelopment.The research findings indicate that the majority of the provincial government’sICT practitioners have ICT-related qualifications, as only 40% of staff in the ITdepartments was reported to be IT non-qualified. 51 51 49 47 47 31 22 Internet Applications Technical analysis Infrastructure management System Business Usage analysis Skills Project Figure 5: Provincial Government Skills AuditThe above skills graph indicates that the government is in the process ofimproving how it conducts its functions and activities in order to reduce overallcosts, provide more efficient use of resources, and better support citizens. Thisis indicated by the fact that Project Management, Business Analysis and SystemAnalysis head the most required skills list.2008 ICT in Government Report 22-119
  24. 24. Many organisations have a Business Analyst, whose role is sometimes referredto as, or combined with that of a System Analyst. Whatever their title, theseprofessionals serve as bridges between the development staff and projectstakeholders. Business analysts work with project stakeholders to identify,document and validate requirements.The need for system and business analysis is also motivated by the fact thatanalysts help to scope the system, identify potential areas of automation andimprove the underlying business process. Business analysts work withdevelopers to translate those requirements into something that they understand,and then translate developers subsequent questions into something thestakeholders can understand ensuring that the cycle continues.Other skills required within the provincial departments are: • Technical skills that include networking, security and web development • Infrastructure • Internet usageThe research findings however, indicate that the majority of the departments(87%) allocate less than 10% of their budget to Skills Development.2008 ICT in Government Report 23-119
  25. 25. 2.1.6. Outsourcing in the Provincial GovernmentFor a department to function efficiently and to offer quality service to the publica number of processes and systems should be in place. Some of these processesand systems are beyond the capabilities of the respective departments, hencethe high incidence of the outsource model the provincial government. 51 51 44 43 40 32 26 Development Development Applications System Integration intranet hosting Hardware/software Network admin Website and Software Skills support Figure 6: Provincial Government Outsourced ServicesThe most outsourced areas within the Provincial Departments are SoftwareDevelopment and Skills Development. These two components are outsourceddue to lack of relevant ICT skills internally, desire for quality and at the need tocut costs by outsourcing non-core areas. Lack of skills 51 Lack of resources 48 Quality purpose 42 Financial more 37 feasible Figure 7: Reasons for outsourcing in the provincial government2008 ICT in Government Report 24-119
  26. 26. 2.1.7. Information and e-Security2.1.7a. Security Technologies/MethodsInformation security is a significant concern for any organisation dependent oncomputer systems for effective operation, be it public or private. The networkboundaries have become difficult to pin point, let alone to defend. Authorisedusers have become even more dangerous than those that need to breach thesecurity systems to get inside the network. Controlling access 86 Keep systems patched 65 User aw areness 63 Monitoring 55 Layered security 51 Role specific security (deciding upon 43 access and privilege) Response team 40 Figure 8: e-Security TechnologiesThe research indicates that the majority of the provincial departmentscountrywide have invested on controlling access (86%), by determining what isallowed into the department’s network. However, the research reveals that thedepartments still saw all the security measures as discrete elements. Forprovincial departments to be fully protected they should adopt a ‘holisticapproach’ to e-security.It is arguable that the provincial departments will continue to use controllingaccess security technology, as it is the departments’ responsibility to determinewhat is allowed into the department’s network. One of the highly recommendedpractices is to make access decisions on the premise of blocking everything, andonly allowing what is needed to conduct business.User awareness technology is also expected to continue getting stronger asusers are the champions of ensuring systems safety and/or high risk resourcesto minimise possible attacks to the department systems.2008 ICT in Government Report 25-119
  27. 27. 2.1.7b. Common Security Policies used by the department Anti-virus 92 Pass w ord 75 Router and sw itch security 69 Remote access 58 Wireless communication 57 Acceptable use 53 Risk assessment 42 Audit 39 VPN 37 Acceptable Encryption 33 Dial in access 29 Information sensitivity 27 Automatically Forw arded e-mail 24 ASP 19 Extranet 14 Analog line 13 Internal lab security 12 ASP standards 9 Figure 9: e-Security PoliciesPolicies governing the e-security systems put in place are just as important asthe security methods themselves. The research reflects that the most commonlyused policy in the departments is Anti-virus policy, which has been reported by92% of the respondents. The Anti-virus policy establishes requirements thatmust be met by all computers connected to the department’s network to ensureeffective detection and prevention. There is less commonality in other respects.Security Software used by the departments includes: • Antivirus – Norton, Trend, Macafee, Nod32 • Firewalls – SITA, Norton, Linux operating system (Open Source) • Antispam – Symantec Norton, Trend, Guava2008 ICT in Government Report 26-119
  28. 28. 2.1.8. Future ICT InvestmentsAccording to ForgeAhead’s 2008 ICTs in Government Research, a large part ofthe R3 billions ICT budget will be spent on acquiring new personal computers,laptops, printers, bandwidth extension, VoIP and website development within thenext 24 months. Personal Computers 72 Printers 62 Internet /Bandwidth extension 59 Voice over IP (VoIP) 52 Website 49 Portal Technology 44 Total Departmental Upgrade 43 Data Warehousing 42 System Integration 42 Call Centre 35 Database system 31 Integration software 27 Satellite Technology 20 Radio/Microwave link 20 Leased lines 20 Financial systems 19 ERP systems 15 eCommerce portal 15 CRM 11 Figure 10: Departments’ Future Investment Index2.1.8a. Acquisition of New HardwareHardware acquisition is expected to be an ongoing investment in the publicsector because of expected obsolescence. Some of the provincial departmentsare considering ‘leasing’ as compared to purchasing hardware and they arebasing their thoughts on calculations that include reduced ownership risk,payment predictability and flexibility.2008 ICT in Government Report 27-119
  29. 29. 2.1.8b. Bandwidth ExtensionThe future Investment graph also indicates that departments are facing an ever-increasing number of users demanding more and more information, which needsgreater bandwidth. Hence, three in five departments are considering extendingtheir bandwidth.2.1.8c. Voice over Internet ProtocolMore than half of the provincial departments are expected to take advantage ofthe proposed upgrade to the GCCN (to NGN status) to enable voice calls to bemade over the Internet. This trend is attributed to the expected reduction highcost of telephone services available through the voice networks.2.1.8d. Data WarehousingData is becoming critical to government departments as it is gathered into acentral repository from which it is analysed to produce reports that are used bymanagement to support the decision-making processes. Warehousing makessense when management wants to restructure data or do periodic reviews oranalyse the data in a particular way.2.1.8e. System IntegrationMore functions and processes in government departments are outsourced andinteroperability is encouraged. Legacy IT systems are fragmented but systemsintegration extends their usable life. Furthermore, the need for data integrationhas expanded far beyond data warehousing to encompass all types of analyticaland operational initiatives. Hence, provincial government is beginning to ride thewave of data integration solutions.2008 ICT in Government Report 28-119
  30. 30. 2.1.9. ICT ProjectsIn the 2008 ForgeAhead ICT in Government Research, the provincialdepartments have reported the existence of over 265 ICT projects. 43 35 12 4 3 3 Delayed Aborted/Failed Not yet started Completed Postponed In Progress Successful Figure 11: Status of ICT Projects in Provincial GovernmentThe findings clearly indicate that most of the 265 ICT projects reported forFinancial Year 2006 to 2008 are a clear indication that strides are being taken toimplement ICTs to enhance service delivery. However, the research reveals thatthe majority of these ICT projects are being undertaken in isolation, within theprovinces where the concept of shared services is not being fully explored.2.1.9a. Current ICT Projects in the departments2.1.9a (i) Network Connectivity, Upgrade and RenewalThe departments are increasing their investment in ICT infrastructure by meansof providing and improving ICT connectivity and this is largely seen in theschools, health institutions, libraries and agriculture districts.A number of provincial departments have confirmed that they are upgradingtheir infrastructure network to address the instability of the current network thathas been plaguing the system. Investing in providing and improving connectivity2008 ICT in Government Report 29-119
  31. 31. is motivated by the need to address the instabilities of the current network andproductive assets that can be used for other economic endeavours.2.1.9a (ii) DRP/Disaster Centre (Business Continuity)The risk of unforeseen events causing financial/service delivery failure hasdriven both public and private organisations to develop both disaster recoveryand business continuity plans. The findings reveal that most of the provincialdepartments are implementing Disaster Centres.2.1.9a (iii) Enterprise Content ManagementThird on the list of current ICT projects is Enterprise Content Management(ECM), reported by a number of departments. The departments are driven todeploy ECM solution by the following needs: • To ensure compliance with industry standards and regulations • To manage the secure creation, archival and deletion of records (including e-mail) • To maximise the value of integrated enterprise content • Increased operating efficiency • Optimal customer experience2.1.9a (iv) Master System PlanThe Master System Plan (MSP) essentially defines the road map to be followedby a department in ensuring effective usage of ICT technologies to improveservice delivery and achieve other governmental objectives. The number ofprovincial departments developing MSPs has increased. The MSPs advocate theconsolidation of systems to ensure seamless operation between systems,ensuring easy storage and retrieval of information.In addition, MSPs are aimed at facilitating a government-wide standardised andintegrated IT architecture framework, as well upgrading and replicating solutionsacross different departments.The MSP covers the following areas:2008 ICT in Government Report 30-119
  32. 32. • Business processes analysis • Production of an inventory of government information systems • Analysis of skills gaps • Reverse engineering or application metadata extraction2.1.9a (v) Website developmentThe departments are developing their website as this is a critical componentwhere contact is made with stakeholders. This activity is largely outsourced dueto quality (professionalism) requirements in order not only to maximise thedepartment’s presence, but also to comply with set website informationprovision best practice.2.1.9 (vi) GISGeographical Information Systems (GIS) has become an important tool fordecision-making in government departments in order to improve servicedelivery. The large numbers of Local Government and Housing departments thatare investing in GIS confirms this trend.2.1.9a (vii) Other common provincial government ICT projects • Intranet development • PBS (Public Broadcast Services) • BCP • Data warehousing • Portal • VPN2008 ICT in Government Report 31-119
  33. 33. 2.1.9b. Completed ICT projectsThe 35% completed ICT projects that the departments have reported includesthe following: • MSP implementation • Network upgrade • Server upgrade • Website development • Call Centre • Mail Servers.2.1.9c. Delayed and Failed ICT ProjectsAccording to the findings, about 3% of the ICT projects in provincial governmentfail due to: • Budget constraints • Initiator of the project leaving the department • User requirements not being met2008 ICT in Government Report 32-119
  34. 34. 3. Provincial Departments Overview3.1. HealthThere is an obvious need to bring ICT connectivity to the South African healthsector. This task needs to occur alongside the provision of basic healthinformation infrastructure, which is the responsibility of the government.However, extensive provision of ICT is beyond the financial resources of thegovernment alone. Partnership with donors and the private sector will thereforebe a critical success factor.3.1.1. ICT Projects3.1.1a. Completed ICT projectsOverall 24 ICT projects were successfully implemented in the last two yearswithin the various Health departments in the country’s nine provinces. Theseprojects include: • Net Wizard Roll-Out • MEMIS Call Centre • Kiosks • VPN • ARV/ART Clinics Networking • Remedy Action Request System • Upgrading of Data Lines • Pharmaceutical Management Information System • MSP • DRP • URS (PHIS) • Server Consolidation • Telemedicine • ART (PAAB) Rollout • Upgrade to XP and PC Upgrade • AV Upgrade2008 ICT in Government Report 33-119
  35. 35. • System Upgrade (HIS) • DB (Oracle) Upgrade • LAN Upgrade (GITOC) • DR George Makhuri (LAN) • Natal Spruit LAN • PTA Academic Hospital Re-location • System Upgrade (clinic system) • Folateng Implementation at Pretoria West, and Helen Joseph3.1.1b. Current ICT ProjectsThe health departments reported nine current ICT projects and these are: • Hardware replacement • ARV Rollout system (4 years project) • EMS • Infrastructure installation - Telecommunication • Patient and Billing System installation • Website development • EPR • Infrastructure upgrade • Hospital Information System3.1.2. ICT Budget in Health ClusterThe research findings show that more than R427 million ICT budget will be spenton provincial departments’ e-Health to ensure that it improves the people’shealth status through optimal use of ICT.3.1.3. Future ICT InvestmentTo ensure e-Health in the provincial government, the departments will use theirICT budgets to acquire: • New PC/Laptops and Printers (reported by 5 departments) • Data Warehousing (4 departments) • Call Centre (4 departments) • System Integration (3 departments)2008 ICT in Government Report 34-119
  36. 36. 3.1.4. General ICT Trends in HealthAll of the Provincial Health Departments that responded to the study aresupporting more than 1 000 PC users and the technology is generally accessedvia GCCN (7), Cellular Network (6), and ISDN (5).Four departments reported using Dial-up, Leased Lines, Wireless Broadband andVPN. Four of the seven Health Departments have reviewed their IT systems andsoftware in 2006, while three departments have been reviewing their systems inthe current financial year. Most of the reviews are done internally.3.1.5. Plans/Policies/Other Technologies Procurem ent 7 Skills developm ent plan 7 DRP 7 ICT Strategy 7 3G 6 SMS Technologies 6 Cell Phones 5 eGov Plan 4 MSP 4 Intranet 4 PDA 3 VoIP 2 Figure 12: Policies in the Health sector departmentsThe above graph indicates that the majority of the departments in the Healthcluster have the following policies, strategies and/or plans: • Procurement & Human Resource • Disaster Recovery Plan • ICT strategy • Usage of 3G, SMS and cell phone technologies2008 ICT in Government Report 35-119
  37. 37. 3.2. Social DevelopmentA common challenge facing Social Development departments is accessibility bypeople for assistance. This is made more difficult by the current filing systemwhere files are easily duplicated, lost and misplaced. Meanwhile, the sameapplicant has to be humiliated by starting the application process all over again.This clearly shows that there is need for an integrated case management and asingle point of access to all files.ICTs in Social Development need to ensure: • Effective accountability and monitoring of service delivery within the departments • Increased productivity and improved turnaround time • Single point of entry for all services provided by the departments • Paper reduction, which is in line with the e-government policy • Easy access and availability of management information • Single version of the truth • Quality of information • Improved planning cooperation and informed business decisions2008 ICT in Government Report 36-119
  38. 38. 3.3. ICT Projects3.3.1. Completed ICT ProjectsThe Social departments have reported the following 13 successful ICT projectswithin the past 34 months. • Infrastructure Connectivity • Implementing IT Plan • Implementing Backup System • Implementing Disaster Recovery Plan • Complete Inventory • Implementing Web-enabled Systems • BCP • Intranet • Digital Access Points • CPR • MIS • GIS • Enterprise Content Management3.3.1b. Current ICT ProjectsThe current ICT projects within the Social Development cluster include: • Rural Connectivity • MSP • Change to Active Directory • Website and Intranet Development • Banapele3.3.2. ICT BudgetThe Social Development cluster has 4% of the ICT budget allocation, totallingR87 million as reported by five provincial departments.2008 ICT in Government Report 37-119
  39. 39. 3.3.3. ICT Future InvestmentThe Social Development cluster is gearing to make major investments in thefollowing areas: • VoIP (6 departments) • Acquisition of new PC/Laptops and Printers (5 departments) • Data Warehousing (5 departments) • Database System (4 departments) • System Integration (3 departments) • Call Centre (3 departments)3.3.4. Policies/Plans/Other Technologies Procurement 6 Skills development plan 5 DRP 5 ICT Strategy 6 3G 6 SMS Technologies 2 Cell Phones 5 eGov Plan 3 MSP 3 Intranet 4 PDA VoIP 2 Figure 13: Policies in the Social Development sectorThe above graph indicates that the majority of the departments in the SocialDevelopment cluster have the following policies, strategies and/or plans: • Procurement, Human Resource and ICT related policies are in place in this cluster • Disaster Recovery Plan is in place • Usage of PDA, SMS and cell phone technologies within the departments is minimal2008 ICT in Government Report 38-119
  40. 40. 3.4. EducationAdvances in ICTs globally are rapidly expanding learning opportunities andaccess to educational resources beyond those immediately or traditionallyavailable. It is therefore critical that the South African education and trainingsystem takes advantage of these technological changes. The question regardingthe programme for improving the quality of education is not whether ICTs shouldbe introduced in teaching and learning but how successfully ICT is to beintroduced in education.The e-Education Policy goal states that “every South African learner in thegeneral and further education and training bands will be ICT capable (that is, beable to use ICTs confidently and creatively to help develop the skills andknowledge they need to achieve personal goals and to be full participants in theglobal community) by 2013”. It is therefore obvious that South African educationdare not fail the nation.Some of the challenges in South African education are: • Lack of Basic Physical Resources • Curriculum Transformation • Poor Education Management Information Systems • Language of Teaching and Learning • Poorly-trained Educators3.4.1. ICT Projects3.4.1a. Completed ICT Projects • Cyberlabs for poor communities • e-School demo project • Open Source ICT LAB • ICT roll-out school • Set up district office • Resource Centre • Server Upgrade • Hardware in schools • School Computerisation - Phase 1 • School Computerisation - Phase 22008 ICT in Government Report 39-119
  41. 41. 3.4.1b. Current Projects • ICASA connecting 540 schools • CSIR 25 Digital Doorway Systems • Upgrade Network Infrastructure • ECM Project • GIS3.4.1c Delayed ICT Project • Development of SISP • GIS • e-Learning project • Hardware to schools • ICT training to officials & educators • School Computerisation - Phase 3ICT projects reported by the provincial Education departments indicate that e-Education is being implemented across the country’s provincial departments, butthe rate is minimal when compared to the challenges facing the sector.3.4.2. ICT BudgetAccording to ForgeAhead’s findings, provincial Education departments’ ICTbudgets amount to 8% of the total budget (R148, 250, 000), placing theEducation departments in fifth position. Given the mentioned challenges it isclear that extensive provision of ICT is beyond the financial resources of thegovernment alone. Partnerships with donors and the private sector will thereforebe a critical success factor.3.4.3. ICT Future InvestmentIn the next 12 to 24 months, a major chunk of ICT investment in the Educationsector in will go to: • Acquisition of new PC/Laptops and Printers (6 departments) • Website Development (5 departments) • Data Warehousing (4 departments) • Database System (4 departments) • Call Centre (3 departments) • Bandwidth Extension (3 departments)2008 ICT in Government Report 40-119
  42. 42. 3.5. TreasuryAbout five treasury departments across the country have reported approximately25 ICT Projects that include both completed and incomplete projects.3.5.1. ICT Projects3.5.1a. Completed ICT Projects • BAS Implementation • Electronic Registry • Hardcat Register • MSP • Network and Server Upgrade • Novel Network Upgrade • Server Consolidation • Training Centres Upgrade • Zenwork Implementation3.5.1b. Current Projects • EDSM • Intenda Implementation • Inventory System • MSP • Network Infrastructure Installation • PBS implementation • Radio Link • Website3.5.2. ICT BudgetTreasury’s ICT budget amounts R247 million as reported by seven departments,which gives this cluster of departments 14% of the total budget.2008 ICT in Government Report 41-119
  43. 43. 3.5.3. ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial Treasury departments are: • VoIP (4 departments) • Acquisition of New PC/Laptops and Printers (4 departments) • Website Development (3 departments) • Data Warehousing (3 departments) • Bandwidth Extension (3 departments)2008 ICT in Government Report 42-119
  44. 44. 3.6. Office of the Premier3.6.1. ICT Project in the Premiers’ OfficeOf the 19 ICT projects reported by seven Offices of the Premier, 32% weresuccessfully implemented and they include: • Storage Area Network (SAN) • Campus Network • Server Room Upgrade • Backup Solution • Procured PC • CATS Installation3.6.1a. Current ICT projects include: • Provincial VPN • ICT Hub (Supplying farmers with information) • ICT Audit • MSP development • BCP/DRP • Network upgrade • SISP • Provincial WAN • ECM2008 ICT in Government Report 43-119
  45. 45. 3.6.2. ICT BudgetThe provincial OTPs ICT budget is R127 million, which is 7% of the total ICTbudget in the provincial government.3.6.3. ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial OTP departments are: • Bandwidth Extension (6 departments) • Portal Technology (6 department) • VoIP (5 departments) • Acquisition of New PC/Laptops and Printers (5 departments) • System Integration (5 departments) • Call Centre (3 departments) • Website Development (4 departments)2008 ICT in Government Report 44-119
  46. 46. 3.7. Public Works, Roads & Transport3.7.1. ICT ProjectsOut of 21 ICT projects reported by the Public Works, Roads and Transportcluster in the previous two years, only four were identified as successful. Projects Status Rental Admin Solution Completed Asset Register Completed Server Consolidation Completed MSP Completed Up-grade of Wan Delayed Portal In Progress Data Warehousing In Progress GIS In Progress Novell Project In Progress Reviewing the Master Systems Plan In Progress Rollout of Knowledge Management Framework In Progress Disaster Recovery Cold Site (with GSSC) In Progress Rollout of Information Management System (Warehousing) In Progress Rollout of Information Technology International Library In Progress Roll-out of Right Fax In Progress Roll-out of Computer Kiosk In Progress LAN Upgrade In Progress ECM Not Yet Started Fleet Management Not Yet Started Master Systems Plan Not Yet Started WAN Upgrade Not Yet StartedTable 4: Status of ICT projects in the Public Works, Roads and Transport sector3.7.2. ICT BudgetThe Public Works, Roads and Transport ICT budget is R120 million3.7.3. ICT Future InvestmentProvincial Public Works, Roads and Transport departments will invest in: • Acquisition of New PC/Laptops and Printers (8 departments) • Website Development (7 departments) • Bandwidth Extension (4 departments) • Software Integration (4 departments) • VoIP (4 departments) • Database System (4 departments) • Call Centre (3 departments) • System Integration (3 departments)2008 ICT in Government Report 45-119
  47. 47. 3.8. Local Government and Housing3.8.1. ICT ProjectsTwenty-nine percent of the reported ICT projects within the Local Governmentand Housing departments are completed. Projects Status Enhance Housing Demand Database Completed Active Director Completed Mails Servers Completed EDSM Completed Exchange Completed ERMS (Enterprise Risk Management System) Completed Database Management System Completed Infrastructure Completed GIS Project Completed Master System Plan Completed Website Development Completed Strategic Alignment Management Completed Survey System Delayed Exis In Progress eKaya In Progress Occupancy Database In Progress Torps In Progress Retro In Progress Debit In Progress HR Management System In Progress Rental Tribunal In Progress GIS In Progress Office Automation In Progress Disaster Centres In Progress Maintaining and Up-grading of GIS/MIS for the Department In Progress Introducing ICT in Local Government In Progress Active Directory In Progress Enterprise Content Management In Progress HER In Progress Municipal Information System In Progress Township Housing Purchase System In Progress Performance Management System Not Yet Started Recruiting System Not Yet Started Reporting System Not Yet Started Training Management Database Not Yet Started Contracts Management Database Not Yet Started Customer Support Centre (Call centre) Postponed Housing Claims Tracking System Postponed Procurement System Postponed Assets and Helpdesk System Postponed Library System (PALS) PostponedTable 4: Status of ICT projects in the Local Government and Housing sector2008 ICT in Government Report 46-119
  48. 48. 3.8.2. ICT BudgetThe combined/reported ICT budget for Local Government and Housingdepartments across the provinces is R75 million.3.8.3. ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial Local Government and Housingdepartments are: • Acquisition of New PC/Laptops and Printers (6 departments) • Website Development (4 departments) • Bandwidth Extension (6 departments) • Software Integration (5 departments) • Portal Technology (8 departments • VoIP (7 departments) • Financial System (4 departments) • Database System (4 departments) • System Integration (6 departments)3.9. Agriculture3.9.1. ICT ProjectsThe Agriculture departments reported an ICT budget of R56 million and areexpected to complete eight current ICT projects. Projects Status IP Network Completed LAN installation at Satellite Offices Completed MSP Project Completed Security System Completed Wireless Application Completed Connectivity to All Sites In Progress Data Warehousing In Progress Disaster Recovery Plan and Backup Plan In Progress Infrastructure Upgrade In Progress Portal and Intranet implementation In Progress Radio Networks In Progress Soil Conservation Software In Progress Website Development In Progress Hardware and Software Installation Not Yet Started Infrastructure and Servers Upgrade Not Yet Started MSP Not Yet Started Network Upgrade Not Yet StartedTable 5: Status of ICT projects in the Agriculture sector2008 ICT in Government Report 47-119
  49. 49. 3.9.2. ICT Future InvestmentMajor investment areas for provincial Agriculture departments are: • Acquisition of New PC/Laptops and Printers (6 departments) • System Integration (6 departments) • Website Development (4 departments) • Bandwidth Extension (4 departments) • Database System (3 departments)3.10. Economic Affairs3.10.1. ICT ProjectsWith an ICT budget of R48 million, the departments of Economic Affairs areaiming to complete five current ICT projects. They have reported ninesuccessfully completed ICT projects. Project Status BPR (Business Process Re-engineering Completed MSP Completed Video Conferencing Completed Server Roll-out Completed Assert Register Completed Consumer System Completed Liquor System Completed Business Funding System Completed Network Infrastructure Development Completed LAN Upgrade In progress Bandwidth Upgrade In progress VoIP In progress PBS In progress Website Development In progressTable 5: Status of ICT projects in the Economic Affairs department2008 ICT in Government Report 48-119

×