Bringing together government, the private sector and local communities to create more sustainable places Local Government ...
AGENDA 18:30 – 18:35 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang LaSalle   Welcome and Introduction 18:35 – 18:45 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang La...
Homebuilding Industry and Localism Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
Localism’s Impact on Home Building  <ul><li>Increased engagement with local communities e.g. one of the six essential elem...
New Roles for Homebuilders? <ul><li>Homebuilder’s traditional role can be described as a “current trader” (Calcutt Review ...
New Ways to Consult? <ul><li>Traditional consultation driven by planning guidance e.g. PPS1 </li></ul><ul><li>Statement of...
Localism and Sustainability <ul><li>Environmental sustainability issue can generally be managed “top down” e.g. Building R...
Lessons from the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
Introduction – What is NextGeneration? <ul><li>Annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builder’s sustainability performance...
Evolution of NextGeneration 2004/2005 Bank of Scotland/WWF Benchmark 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark 2007 Corporate...
Executive Committee, Secretariat and Sponsors <ul><li>Executive Committee: Homes and Communities Agency, World Wide Fund f...
Membership <ul><li>Members: Barratt Developments, Berkeley Group, Crest Nicholson, Lend Lease, Gladedale Group, Galliford ...
Benchmarking process Public launch Nov Phase 1  All home builders public information May Criteria Development Jan-Apr Phas...
Sustainable Communities Benchmark <ul><li>“ Sustainable communities meet the diverse needs of existing and future resident...
Sustainable Communities Benchmark When decisions are made about a community, local people are included in the decision-mak...
Sustainable Communities Criteria 1. Strategy, Governance & Risk Management 2. Delivering Sustainable Communities Strategy:...
Overall results
Customer engagement Customer research e.g. focus groups Voluntary regulation e.g. Consumer Code Better customer satisfacti...
16 companies Improving skills e.g. apprenticeships 10 companies  Working with local sub-contractors Local economic develop...
Stakeholder engagement Barratt Developments Publicly reported KPI of % of developments that plan for community engagement ...
3. Sector strengths Stakeholder engagement Despite individual examples of best practice, majority of homebuilders do not h...
How NextGeneration can help Local Authorities Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
How do local authorities engage with home builders? <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Through Planning Policy:  Many Loca...
How can NextGeneration benchmark help? <ul><li>Use as an objective, third party assessment of homebuilder sustainability c...
Community Led Planning Peter Andrew – Land and Planning Director Taylor Wimpey
Introduction <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey is one of the largest homebuilders in the UK with national coverage from 24 regional of...
Challenges <ul><li>We urgently need more housing in the UK </li></ul><ul><li>Housing is one of the big social and economic...
Government Policy and the NPPF  <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey supports the Coalition Government’s Localism agenda and the changes ...
Government Policy and the NPPF  <ul><li>Our paper was only an informed contribution – the final document will be the Gover...
Localism <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey wants to be part of the housing recovery, and is working with the grain of Government polic...
TW’s approach <ul><li>Engagement is different to consultation </li></ul><ul><li>Developing our people throughout 2011 with...
  Conclusion <ul><li>The industry and Local Authorities must work together to make the new policy work effectively </li></...
Conclusions  Philip Hirst Jones Lang LaSalle
Conclusions <ul><li>Localism’s impact on homebuilders and all stakeholders involved in the creation of new sustainable pla...
Questions & Answers
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  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • This years benchmark has been overseen by an Executive Committee of the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Homes and Communities Agency Jones Lang LaSalle acts as the secretariat for the benchmark This year’s report has also kindly be sponsored by the National House Building Council Lloyds Banking Group have also kindly sponsored this year’s report and today’s launch event
  • This years benchmark has been overseen by an Executive Committee of the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Homes and Communities Agency Jones Lang LaSalle acts as the secretariat for the benchmark This year’s report has also kindly be sponsored by the National House Building Council Lloyds Banking Group have also kindly sponsored this year’s report and today’s launch event
  • This years benchmark has been overseen by an Executive Committee of the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Homes and Communities Agency Jones Lang LaSalle acts as the secretariat for the benchmark This year’s report has also kindly be sponsored by the National House Building Council Lloyds Banking Group have also kindly sponsored this year’s report and today’s launch event
  • This years benchmark has been overseen by an Executive Committee of the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Homes and Communities Agency Jones Lang LaSalle acts as the secretariat for the benchmark This year’s report has also kindly be sponsored by the National House Building Council Lloyds Banking Group have also kindly sponsored this year’s report and today’s launch event
  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • The first benchmark was run in 2004 and was initiated by the World Wide Fund for Nature and Bank of Scotland who wanted to understand more about the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability NextGeneration was launched in 2006 to build on and expand the success of the first two benchmarks In 2007 and 2009, Corporate Benchmarks were undertaken focusing on how home builders manage sustainability within their own company In 2008, a climate change benchmark was undertaken NextGeneration is therefore now in its 6 th year with a seventh benchmark planned for 2011, demonstrating the continued demand for an authoritative assessment of home builders sustainability
  • This years benchmark has been overseen by an Executive Committee of the World Wide Fund for Nature and the Homes and Communities Agency Jones Lang LaSalle acts as the secretariat for the benchmark This year’s report has also kindly be sponsored by the National House Building Council Lloyds Banking Group have also kindly sponsored this year’s report and today’s launch event
  • The following 12 companies have also participated in this years benchmark, helping to the benchmarking criteria and participating a more detailed assessment of their sustainability performance These companies are responsible for over 50% of private sector house building in the UK in the last year
  • The process that has been undertaken to produce this year’s report began at the start of 2010 with the creation of benchmarking criteria by the members, Exec Committee and Secretariat Following finalization of the criteria, all of the top 25 UK home builders were benchmarked against the criteria based on their publicly available information Member companies also participated in a further assessment against the benchmark based on non-public infomration Following completion of the benchmarking process, the results have been analysed and the report produced
  • As I mentioned earlier, the topic of this years benchmark has been sustainable communities I would therefore like to address what is a sustainable community? The concept of a sustainable community was most clearly defined in the Egan Review in 2005 which defined a sustainable community as “meeting the diverse needs of existing and future residents, their children and other users, contribute to a high quality of life and provide opportunity and choice. They achieve this in ways that make effective use of natural resources, enhance the environment, promote social cohesion and inclusion and strengthen economic prosperity.” One of the key things the Egan Review did was to focus on the social and economic aspects of sustainability, which are often neglected in the efforts to reduce the environmental impact of their operations and products
  • The Egan Review also provided the Egan wheel to further define the components of a sustainable community Sustainable communities should be: Well run Well connected Well served Environmentally sensitive Thriviing Well designed Well built Active Inclusive a And safe Amonst these components, home builders have the greatest role in ensuring new communities are well designed and built however, as the primary instigators and designers of new communities, home builders must ensure they address all of the other components of the Egan Wheel, often in collaboration with other stakeholders, A wheel was used to demonstrate that all components need to be present in order for a community to be truly sustainable.
  • Based on this context, it was therefore felt by member companies, the Executive Committee and the Secretariat that the was significant benefit to be derived from a sustainable communities benchmark A set of criteria was therefore created to benchmark the home building industry’s performance in creating sustainable communities, based on the developments outlined in the previous slide The criteria were in two sections: Section 1 – Strategy, Governance and Risk Management examined the home builders high level, strategic approach to managing the delivery of sustainable communities through its strategy, governance and risk management of the issuue Section 2 examined delivery of sustainable communities on the ground by examining how sustainable communities issues were dealt with at all stages of the creation of a new community – from land acquisition, to obtaining planning permission, construction, selling homes and once people have moved into their new homes.
  • Following completion of the benchmarking against these criteria, the following ranking of the top 25 UK home builders performance in deliverying sustainable communities was produced: The light blue score is based on a companies public information And the dark blue score is based on evidence obtained through a more detailed assessment of member companies 1 st place was taken by the Berkeley Group Second place by Crest Nicholson And 3 rd place by Miller Homes As can be seen, member companies outperformed non member companies with the highest ranking by a non member company was for Countryside Properties in 11 th place Five companies did not score any points under the benchmark However, a low score for member companies does not indicate poor performance in delivering sustainable communities, rather a lack of public disclosure of information in this area The 25 companies assessed included included 10 publicly listed companies and 15 privately owned companies Whilst public companies potentially have a greater incentive to provide more public information on topics such as sustainable communities for the benefit of stakeholders, particulalry investors, there was stong performance from privately owned companies under the benchmark with the majority of the top 5 is made up of privately owned companies
  • A second strength that emerged during the benchmarking process was in relation to customer care – a home builder’s customers being the eventual members of the new communities the home builder creates The Barker Review 2004 and the Office of Fair Trading Home Building 2007 study both identified a problem of low customer satisfaction in the industry – with average customer satisfaction in the low 80% Based on benchmarking results, the home building industry appears to have responded to the problem identified in the Barker Review and OFT study Firstly, evidence of increased customer researcha dn engagement with customers was found, the most common example being focus groups Secondly, following the threat of cumpolsory regulation in relation to customer care contained in the OFT study, a voluntary customer care standard – the Consumer Code for Home Builders – has been introduced to ensure more consistent performance in relation to customer care amongst home builders Thurdly, there was evidence of improved quality and volume of customer satsifcation data, with customer satisfaction being the most comonly reported items amongst all companies and the majority of companies using an external survey (NHBC/HBF) to ensure improved validity These measures appear to have resulted in an overall improvement in customer satisfaction within the industry, with anaverage of 89%, close to 90% recorded amongst the companies assessed
  • The final strength that emerged was in relation to economic development A high level of engagement with local communities during the construction phase of housing projects was found with 10 companies had examples of working with local sub-contractors A high level of developing skills within the industry, particulalry amongst site staff, was also found with 16 companies delivering programmes to improve the skills of site staff such as through apprenticeships Examples were also found of companies working to increase the number of people from under represented groups in the industry The primary way that home builders deliver these economic development programmes is in partnership with other stakeholders The logos indicate just some of the partners the companies assessed have worked with, including charities, government agencies and local government Demonstrating the partnership approach required to deliver sustainable communities
  • A second strength that emerged during the benchmarking process was in relation to customer care – a home builder’s customers being the eventual members of the new communities the home builder creates The Barker Review 2004 and the Office of Fair Trading Home Building 2007 study both identified a problem of low customer satisfaction in the industry – with average customer satisfaction in the low 80% Based on benchmarking results, the home building industry appears to have responded to the problem identified in the Barker Review and OFT study Firstly, evidence of increased customer researcha dn engagement with customers was found, the most common example being focus groups Secondly, following the threat of cumpolsory regulation in relation to customer care contained in the OFT study, a voluntary customer care standard – the Consumer Code for Home Builders – has been introduced to ensure more consistent performance in relation to customer care amongst home builders Thurdly, there was evidence of improved quality and volume of customer satsifcation data, with customer satisfaction being the most comonly reported items amongst all companies and the majority of companies using an external survey (NHBC/HBF) to ensure improved validity These measures appear to have resulted in an overall improvement in customer satisfaction within the industry, with anaverage of 89%, close to 90% recorded amongst the companies assessed
  • A second strength that emerged during the benchmarking process was in relation to customer care – a home builder’s customers being the eventual members of the new communities the home builder creates The Barker Review 2004 and the Office of Fair Trading Home Building 2007 study both identified a problem of low customer satisfaction in the industry – with average customer satisfaction in the low 80% Based on benchmarking results, the home building industry appears to have responded to the problem identified in the Barker Review and OFT study Firstly, evidence of increased customer researcha dn engagement with customers was found, the most common example being focus groups Secondly, following the threat of cumpolsory regulation in relation to customer care contained in the OFT study, a voluntary customer care standard – the Consumer Code for Home Builders – has been introduced to ensure more consistent performance in relation to customer care amongst home builders Thurdly, there was evidence of improved quality and volume of customer satsifcation data, with customer satisfaction being the most comonly reported items amongst all companies and the majority of companies using an external survey (NHBC/HBF) to ensure improved validity These measures appear to have resulted in an overall improvement in customer satisfaction within the industry, with anaverage of 89%, close to 90% recorded amongst the companies assessed
  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • I would like to begin with an introduction to NextGeneration NextGeneration is an annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builders performance in delivering sustainable development The benchmark allows investors in the home building sector, central and local government and the general public to understand the home building sectors performance in delivering sustainability through an objective and independent report The benchmark is also a powerful tool for the home builders themselves, allwowing them to understand their own performance in delivering sustainability, how this relates to their peers and to communicate their performance
  • Thank you Julie Good Morning everybody My name is Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant, Upstream Sustainability Services at Jones Lang LaSalle It is my pleasure to present to you the More than Bricks and Mortar report containing the results of the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark
  • Fringe bringing together government, the private sector an

    1. 1. Bringing together government, the private sector and local communities to create more sustainable places Local Government Association Conference 2011 NextGeneration/Jones Lang LaSalle and Taylor Wimpey 28 th June 2011 18:30 to 19:30
    2. 2. AGENDA 18:30 – 18:35 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang LaSalle Welcome and Introduction 18:35 – 18:45 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang LaSalle Homebuilding Industry and Localism 18:45 – 18:55 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang LaSalle Lessons from the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark 18:55 – 19:05 Philip Hirst, Jones Lang LaSalle How NextGeneration can help Local Authorities 19:05 – 19:25 Peter Andrew, Taylor Wimpey Community Led Planning 19:25 Question and Answer Session Drinks and Networking
    3. 3. Homebuilding Industry and Localism Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
    4. 4. Localism’s Impact on Home Building <ul><li>Increased engagement with local communities e.g. one of the six essential elements of Localism is to “empower communities to do things their way” </li></ul><ul><li>New organisations to engage with e.g. Local Enterprise Partnerships, mutuals, co-operatives etc </li></ul><ul><li>Greater transparency in planning decisions and process e.g. Enquiry by Design </li></ul><ul><li>Greater local benefits from development e.g. Community Infrastructure Levy </li></ul><ul><li>Developments that respond to local needs e.g. family housing </li></ul>
    5. 5. New Roles for Homebuilders? <ul><li>Homebuilder’s traditional role can be described as a “current trader” (Calcutt Review of Housing) </li></ul><ul><li>i.e. sale of freehold, employment of managing agent, short term </li></ul><ul><li>How does this role fit with ideas about Localism and the Big Society? </li></ul><ul><li>Localism requires individuals, government and businesses to adopt “new roles” e.g. local charities running services </li></ul><ul><li>What new roles could/should homebuilder’s adopt? </li></ul><ul><li>Energy Supplier? e.g. ESCOs </li></ul><ul><li>Estate manager? e.g. Berkeley/Aviva PRSI schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Partner? e.g. Community Land Trusts </li></ul><ul><li>Landlord? e.g. Willmott Dixon market rent developments </li></ul>
    6. 6. New Ways to Consult? <ul><li>Traditional consultation driven by planning guidance e.g. PPS1 </li></ul><ul><li>Statement of Community Involvement (SCI), public notices, newspaper advertisements, letter drop by home builder/local authority, consultation event in local hall, planning meeting, pre-meetings with planning officers </li></ul><ul><li>What new forms of consultation can help deliver increased levels of engagement with local communities? </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic consultation e.g. e-mail, websites, Twitter, forums </li></ul><ul><li>Best practice tools e.g. Planning for Real, Enquiry by Design </li></ul><ul><li>Resident or Design Panels? </li></ul><ul><li>Post-occupancy feedback? </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative venues e.g. shopping centres, leisure centres, high streets </li></ul>
    7. 7. Localism and Sustainability <ul><li>Environmental sustainability issue can generally be managed “top down” e.g. Building Regulations, renewable energy targets etc and have non-local or global impacts e.g. climate change </li></ul><ul><li>Social and economic sustainability issues tend to be local in nature e.g. access to amenities, proximity to public transport, employment etc and have local impacts e.g. impact on quality of life </li></ul><ul><li>People, not technology, are required to solve these problems </li></ul><ul><li>“ Sustainability” or an equivalent term is not explicitly mentioned in the Localism literature </li></ul><ul><li>However, localism is of direct relevance to resolving sustainability issues, particularly social and economic sustainability issues e.g. </li></ul><ul><li>Creation of a sense of community </li></ul><ul><li>Local employment initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Increased engagement </li></ul>
    8. 8. Lessons from the NextGeneration 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
    9. 9. Introduction – What is NextGeneration? <ul><li>Annual benchmark of the top 25 UK home builder’s sustainability performance </li></ul><ul><li>Allows investors, government and the public to understand the sustainability of the sector </li></ul><ul><li>Allows the sector to understand and improve its performance </li></ul>
    10. 10. Evolution of NextGeneration 2004/2005 Bank of Scotland/WWF Benchmark 2010 Sustainable Communities Benchmark 2007 Corporate Benchmark 2008 Climate Change Benchmark 2009 Corporate Benchmark
    11. 11. Executive Committee, Secretariat and Sponsors <ul><li>Executive Committee: Homes and Communities Agency, World Wide Fund for Nature </li></ul><ul><li>Secretariat: Jones Lang LaSalle </li></ul><ul><li>Report Sponsors: National Home Building Council </li></ul><ul><li>Initiative Sponsors: Lloyds Banking Group </li></ul>
    12. 12. Membership <ul><li>Members: Barratt Developments, Berkeley Group, Crest Nicholson, Lend Lease, Gladedale Group, Galliford Try, Keepmoat Group, Miller Homes, Morris Homes, Redrow, Taylor Wimpey, Willmott Dixon </li></ul>
    13. 13. Benchmarking process Public launch Nov Phase 1 All home builders public information May Criteria Development Jan-Apr Phase 2 Member assessment of internal information Jun-Sept
    14. 14. Sustainable Communities Benchmark <ul><li>“ Sustainable communities meet the diverse needs of existing and future residents, their children and other users, contribute to a high quality of life and provide opportunity and choice. They achieve this in ways that make effective use of natural resources, enhance the environment, promote social cohesion and inclusion and strengthen economic prosperity.” </li></ul><ul><li>The Egan Review: Skills for Sustainable Communities - 2005 </li></ul>
    15. 15. Sustainable Communities Benchmark When decisions are made about a community, local people are included in the decision-making process. The community enjoys a sense of civic values, responsibility and pride.
    16. 16. Sustainable Communities Criteria 1. Strategy, Governance & Risk Management 2. Delivering Sustainable Communities Strategy: Approach, Targets, Monitoring, Reporting, Initiatives Governance: Senior Representative, Working Group, Training Risk Management: Reporting, Process, Financial Implications Location & Connectivity: Distance to transport nodes, home office working, cycle storage, travel plans, innovative measures to reduce car dependency Planning & Design: Public realm, open space, community facilities, Building for Life, Lifetime Homes, Secured by Design, EcoHomes, Code for Sustainable Homes, infrastructure Engagement: corporate engagement, project engagement, customer engagement, customer care Management & Legacy: Considerate Constructors Scheme, monitoring and evaluation, job creation, economic development
    17. 17. Overall results
    18. 18. Customer engagement Customer research e.g. focus groups Voluntary regulation e.g. Consumer Code Better customer satisfaction data e.g. HBF survey Average customer satisfaction 89%
    19. 19. 16 companies Improving skills e.g. apprenticeships 10 companies Working with local sub-contractors Local economic development
    20. 20. Stakeholder engagement Barratt Developments Publicly reported KPI of % of developments that plan for community engagement Willmott Dixon Standard approach to community engagement, Community Engagement Team and methodology developed with Business in the Community Keepmoat Community Mark Accreditation & work with Whitburn Shores Community Land Trust Galliford Try Planning for Real with Yarborough Tenant’s Association
    21. 21. 3. Sector strengths Stakeholder engagement Despite individual examples of best practice, majority of homebuilders do not have a standard, publicized approach to community engagement based on best practice principles and using best practice techniques <ul><li>Where examples of best practice were found they tended to be: </li></ul><ul><li>On the largest projects </li></ul><ul><li>Where central or local government funding/land has been provided </li></ul>Initial results of 2011 benchmarking is that homebuiders are responding to the challenge of Localism and looking to standardize and improve their approach to community engagement
    22. 22. How NextGeneration can help Local Authorities Philip Hirst, Senior Consultant Jones Lang LaSalle
    23. 23. How do local authorities engage with home builders? <ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Through Planning Policy: Many Local Development Frameworks (LDFs) and Supplementary Planning Documents (SPDs) include sustainability targets beyond statutory minimum e.g. renewable energy requirements (Merton rule) or minimum Code for Sustainable Homes levels etc </li></ul><ul><li>Through the Planning Process: Planning dialogue, s106 agreements etc </li></ul><ul><li>Partnering </li></ul><ul><li>Through procurement: The sustainability of partner organisations is often assessed as part of Pre-Qualification Questionnaires (PQQs) and Open Journal of the European Union (OJEU) tender exercises. </li></ul><ul><li>Through project monitoring and evaluation: </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainability targets are also often set as part of these projects. </li></ul>
    24. 24. How can NextGeneration benchmark help? <ul><li>Use as an objective, third party assessment of homebuilder sustainability claims </li></ul><ul><li>Use report as a source of best practice case studies to refer homebuilders to </li></ul><ul><li>Use as a framework to compare potential homebuilder partner performance </li></ul><ul><li>Use as a qualification criteria for joint venture partners </li></ul><ul><li>Use as a tool to monitor partner performance on sustainability </li></ul><ul><li>Use as a planning condition requirement </li></ul><ul><li>Access latest thought leadership and research on sustainable home building </li></ul><ul><li>Engage with homebuilders at quarterly events </li></ul>
    25. 25. Community Led Planning Peter Andrew – Land and Planning Director Taylor Wimpey
    26. 26. Introduction <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey is one of the largest homebuilders in the UK with national coverage from 24 regional offices </li></ul><ul><li>We build around 10,000 homes a year in the UK covering a wide range of homes, from one bedroom apartments to five bedroom houses, with prices ranging from below £100,000 to above £500,000 </li></ul><ul><li>We build affordable housing across the UK, which represented 18% of our 2010 completions </li></ul><ul><li>Market currently stable in terms of buyers and price </li></ul>
    27. 27. Challenges <ul><li>We urgently need more housing in the UK </li></ul><ul><li>Housing is one of the big social and economic challenges we face </li></ul><ul><li>Existing planning system has failed to deliver sufficient land to meet housing demand </li></ul><ul><li>Market subdued due to lack of mortgage availability for first time buyers </li></ul><ul><li>Mortgage difficulty and money for deposit means 6m non-home owning British adults do not intend to buy a property </li></ul><ul><li>Bank of mum and dad does not have unlimited funds and lack of housing supply will only exacerbate situation </li></ul><ul><li>Burden of Regulation having effect on viability </li></ul>
    28. 28. Government Policy and the NPPF <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey supports the Coalition Government’s Localism agenda and the changes to the planning system </li></ul><ul><li>New Homes Bonus </li></ul><ul><li>Reduction in ‘red tape’ initiative </li></ul><ul><li>Invitation from Greg Clark MP to be a part of a group of four experts from local government, industry, planning consultancy, and an NGO to draft a new National Planning and Policy Framework </li></ul><ul><li>Our aim was to create a simplified framework which would encourage quicker economic growth but protect environment and heritage </li></ul><ul><li>Key points:- </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Presumption in favour of sustainable development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plan led – Robust evidence base for need and demand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Right Land for development </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Duty to Cooperate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Clear intent to deliver more housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>5 year land supply +20% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>viability </li></ul></ul>
    29. 29. Government Policy and the NPPF <ul><li>Our paper was only an informed contribution – the final document will be the Government’s own </li></ul>
    30. 30. Localism <ul><li>Taylor Wimpey wants to be part of the housing recovery, and is working with the grain of Government policy </li></ul><ul><li>House builders to become more local </li></ul><ul><li>Progressing ways of making our regional businesses more open, transparent and accessible </li></ul><ul><li>Communities need to see the benefits of localism and understand its implications </li></ul><ul><li>Development which is not sustainable in their widest sense will not be acceptable. </li></ul><ul><li>But sustainable also means schools, hospitals, GPs, roads </li></ul>
    31. 31. TW’s approach <ul><li>Engagement is different to consultation </li></ul><ul><li>Developing our people throughout 2011 with the skills needed for effective communication and community engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Process map to assist our people </li></ul><ul><li>Developing a new Taylor Wimpey website which aims to provide greater understanding of and insight into our business and expertise </li></ul><ul><li>Online portal which will provide communities with increased opportunities to contribute to the planning process. </li></ul><ul><li>We are also working on forging stronger working relationships with local decision makers and members of local communities </li></ul>
    32. 32. Conclusion <ul><li>The industry and Local Authorities must work together to make the new policy work effectively </li></ul><ul><li>Local Authorities need to ensure that their planning officials are prepared. It is new to all of us </li></ul><ul><li>Sustainable development is paramount </li></ul><ul><li>We must look to build communities not simply houses </li></ul><ul><li>Taylor Wimpey’s recent development in Worcestershire is a successful example of everyone working together – described by local councillor as “the Big Society working how it was supposed to” </li></ul><ul><li>We will work to ensure this becomes the norm, not the exception </li></ul>
    33. 33. Conclusions Philip Hirst Jones Lang LaSalle
    34. 34. Conclusions <ul><li>Localism’s impact on homebuilders and all stakeholders involved in the creation of new sustainable places is significant </li></ul><ul><li>Research suggests that there is a lack of standard approach to community engagement amongst homebuilders, as well as a lack of use of best practice engagement techniques </li></ul><ul><li>However, the home builders who participated in the NextGeneration benchmark represent some of the most progressive companies in the sector and have participated in a challenging assessment of their approach in this area </li></ul><ul><li>Homebuilders are reassessing their approach to engagement in light of Localism </li></ul><ul><li>The results provide a window into homebuilder performance in this area for local authorities and can be used as a tool for new ways of engaging with private sector home builders </li></ul>
    35. 35. Questions & Answers

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