How Newberry College Can Support the Workforce Pipeline

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Newberry College asked me to come and share information about the future of their job market. They were also interested in how to help the long-term unemployed and what adults students might need to …

Newberry College asked me to come and share information about the future of their job market. They were also interested in how to help the long-term unemployed and what adults students might need to get back into the workforce.

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  • So what do you want to be when you grow up? Think about it because I might ask you later!
    <<Tell a little about yourself and your background…>>
  • The goal for today is to let you see data and sources that will help your students make good career choices. Careers that pay well and have a future.
  • So, let’s look at the population and labor force in South Carolina. We will use SC data today since you are from all over the state.
  • So, let’s look at the population and labor force in South Carolina. We will use SC data today since you are from all over the state.
  • In order to know what you face in an adult ed environment, you need to understand the make-up of what is coming through your doors.
    This table shows population characteristics for the state and for the 3 largest counties.
    You can see that over 23% of the population in SC is under 18 years old. There is also a large group, 14.1%, that is 65 years or older.
    The state is predominately white, with over 28% black. This varies by county as you can see with Richland County being almost even between black and white, while Greenville County has only 18% black.
    We will talk in more depth about high school graduates and Bachelor’s degrees later on.
    It is interesting to see the percentages of languages spent at home that are other than English: Greenville has over 11%!
  • In order to know what you face in an adult ed environment, you need to understand the make-up of what is coming through your doors.
    This table shows population characteristics for the state and for the 3 largest counties.
    You can see that over 23% of the population in SC is under 18 years old. There is also a large group, 14.1%, that is 65 years or older.
    The state is predominately white, with over 28% black. This varies by county as you can see with Richland County being almost even between black and white, while Greenville County has only 18% black.
    We will talk in more depth about high school graduates and Bachelor’s degrees later on.
    It is interesting to see the percentages of languages spent at home that are other than English: Greenville has over 11%!
  • Before you can really understand the labor force, you need to understand some definitions…
    EMPLOYED: People 16 or older who worked FOR PAY anytime during the week of the 12th of the month. You might think that is an arbritary date but the 12th was picked because it is the date closest to the middle of the month that has the fewest national holidays.
    UNEMPLOYED: Same age group but want a job and are able to work. We call this the “able and available rule”: you are able to work (you have transportation and child or elder care figured out, and you are not sick, and you are available for work.
    LABOR FORCE: Just employed and unemployed added together
    UNEMP. RATE: Just a mathematical equation of the unemployment divided by the labor force.
    The unemployment rate is NOT just everyone who gets an unemployment check. It is more than that. Initial unemployment claims are included but the “recipe” also includes employment, turnover, layoffs, and data from neighboring states that share a labor market.
  • This is the BLS website, one of the hard ones to navigate…
    Check out what the arrow is pointing to…BLS will soon have more information for students and teachers!
  • But here are some teacher-friendly parts of the BLS website:
  • The US Census Bureau should be familiar to all of us and the keeper of the data about the population. It has a vast amount of information but can be hard to navigate. They do have a great teacher resource through…
  • This puts all of the education/school-related Census resources in one place.
    Facts for Features is very timely—it has Back to School statistics up now—Yes, already!!
    They also have lesson plans and teaching ideas. It’s a great resource!

Transcript

  • 1. How Newberry College Can Support the Workforce Pipeline October 8, 2013 Lorraine Faulds Workforce Intelligence Coordinator SC Department of Employment & Workforce
  • 2. Goal for this workshop: Expose Newberry College staff to the local labor market and explore how it can assist in growing and keeping a skilled workforce.
  • 3. College Degrees and Unemployment Rates College majors with the highest unemployment College majors with lowest unemployment rates 1. Clinical psychology 19.5% 1. Medical technology technician 1.4% 2. Miscellaneous fine arts 16.2% 2. Nursing 2.2% 3. United States history 15.1% 3. Treatment therapy professions 2.6% 4. Library science 15.0% 4. Medical assisting services 2.9% 5. (tie) Military technologies; educational psychology 10.9% 5. Agriculture production & management 3.0%
  • 4. College Degrees and ROI Worst & Best College Degrees in the US Based on Return on Investment WORST Sociology Fine Arts Education Religious Studies/Theology Hospitality/Tourism Nutrition Psychology Communications Source: www.salary.com BEST Math Information Technology Human Resources Economics Biology Engineering Marketing English
  • 5. What Students Would Have Done Differently To Be Successful in Today’s Labor Market Source: Unfulfilled Expectations: Recent College Graduates Struggle in a Troubled Economy, John J. Heldrich Center for Workforce Development, Rutgers University, May 2011
  • 6. A word about geography & timeliness Local data in this presentation is for either Newberry County or the Upper Savannah Workforce Area, which includes Abbeville Edgefield, Greenwood, Laurens, McCormick, Newberry, and Saluda counties. Some data may seem old (ex. 1st quarter 2013), but our data goes through rigorous quality assurance checks (on both the state and national levels) to make sure that it is as accurate as possible.
  • 7. A look at the local area… (population characteristics & labor force)
  • 8. Population Characteristics
  • 9. Population Characteristics Population by Age (2011) Newberry 0-9 10-19 20-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80 & older USAV 12.4 13.7 12.6 12.4 12.7 14.2 11.7 6.3 4.0 12.3 13.7 12.5 11.4 14.3 13.8 11.7 6.4 3.8
  • 10. Commuting Patterns
  • 11. Labor Force Information First, a few definitions… Employed: Persons 16 years old or older who worked for pay any time during the week that included the 12th of the month. Unemployed: Persons 16 years old or older who are not working but want a job and are able and willing to work. Labor Force: Employed plus unemployed. Unemployment Rate: Unemployment divided by labor force.
  • 12. Employment in Newberry County, Last 12 Months Source: SC DEW, Local Area Unemployment Statistics program
  • 13. Unemployment in Newberry County, Last 12 Months Source: SC DEW, Local Area Unemployment Statistics program
  • 14. Unemployment Rate, Last 12 Months Newberry County and SC Source: SC DEW, Local Area Unemployment Statistics program
  • 15. Newberry County & SC Unemployment Rate with Recession RECESSION Source: SC DEW, Local Area Unemployment Statistics program
  • 16. Current Industry Employment Employment by Industry for Newberry County, Upper Savannah WIA, and SC First quarter 2013 Newberry USAV SC Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting 4.1 2.1 0.6 Mining 0.0 n/a 0.1 Utilities 0.6 1.0 0.9 Construction 5.1 3.1 4.3 40.5 27.0 12.3 2.5 2.1 3.6 10.6 9.7 12.4 Transportation and Warehousing 2.1 3.7 3.2 Information 0.6 0.7 1.6 Finance and Insurance 1.4 1.6 3.7 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 0.5 0.4 1.4 Professional and Technical Services 1.0 1.9 4.6 Management of Companies and Enterprises n/a 0.5 0.9 Administrative and Waste Services 4.0 5.6 7.5 Educational Services n/a 10.1 9.4 11.7 13.7 13.1 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 1.0 1.0 1.4 Accommodation and Food Services 7.1 6.5 10.2 Other Services, Ex. Public Admin 1.7 1.8 2.7 Public Administration 5.5 7.5 6.0 Manufacturing Wholesale Trade Retail Trade Health Care and Social Assistance
  • 17. Where Are The Jobs? Newberry County Employment by Industry, 1st Qtr. 2013 Industry Manufacturing % of Emp. 40.5 Health Care and Social Assistance 11.7 Retail Trade 10.6 Accommodation and Food Services 7.1 Public Administration 5.5 Construction 5.1 Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting 4.1 Administrative and Waste Services 4.0 Wholesale Trade 2.5 Transportation and Warehousing 2.1 Other Services, Ex. Public Admin 1.7 Finance and Insurance 1.4 Professional and Technical Services 1.0 Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation 1.0 Information 0.6 Utilities 0.6 Real Estate and Rental and Leasing 0.5 Mining 0.0 Management of Companies and Enterprises n/a Educational Services n/a Manufacturing Top Sectors Wood Product Manufacturing Machinery Manufacturing
  • 18. Current Occupational Employment Top 20 Occupations with Wages in USAV, 2012 Cashiers Slaughterers and Meat Packers Team Assemblers Retail Salespersons Customer Service Representatives Laborers and Freight, Stock, and Material Movers, Hand Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Janitors and Cleaners, Except Maids and Housekeeping Cleaners Registered Nurses Maintenance and Repair Workers, General Combined Food Preparation and Serving Workers, Including Fast Food Nursing Assistants Office Clerks, General Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Secretaries and Administrative Assistants, Except Legal, Medical, and Executive Waiters and Waitresses Secondary School Teachers, Except Special and Career/Technical Education Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators General and Operations Managers Teacher Assistants $18,264 $25,041 $32,121 $23,936 $25,185 $22,483 $45,456 $20,614 $62,153 $35,485 $17,955 $20,052 $24,494 $35,660 $28,606 $17,244 $46,196 $17,487 $89,228 $19,013
  • 19. The Crystal Ball Top 20 jobs with the most openings in The Upper Savannah WIA Area (2010-2020) Registered Nurses Medical and Health Services Managers Recreation Workers Accountants and Auditors Industrial Production Managers Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Pharmacists First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Workers First-Line Supervisors of Personal Service Workers First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Industrial Machinery Mechanics Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks Medical Assistants Pharmacy Technicians Police and Sheriff's Patrol Officers Team Assemblers Extruding, Forming, Pressing, and Compacting Machine Operators Molding, Coremaking, and Casting Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders
  • 20. Top 50 Jobs with the Most Openings in the Upper Savannah WIA Top 50 Projected Occupations for the Upper Savannah Workforce Investment Area, 2010-2020 Code Occupation Title Total, All Occupations 291111 119111 399032 132011 113051 252021 291051 431011 391021 411011 533032 499041 472073 433031 Registered Nurses Medical and Health Services Managers Recreation Workers Accountants and Auditors Industrial Production Managers Elementary School Teachers, Except Special Education Pharmacists First-Line Supervisors of Office and Administrative Workers First-Line Supervisors of Personal Service Workers First-Line Supervisors of Retail Sales Workers Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Drivers Industrial Machinery Mechanics Operating Engineers and Other Construction Equipment Operators Bookkeeping, Accounting, and Auditing Clerks 2010 2020 Net Estimate Projection Change 84,771 95,323 10,552 1,343 243 473 326 217 1,366 191 838 275 1,003 883 375 339 930 1,685 311 563 381 270 1,618 244 943 324 1,096 1,036 470 443 1,050 342 68 90 55 53 252 53 105 49 93 153 95 104 120 Percent Change Career Cluster 12.4 25.5 28.0 19.0 16.9 24.4 18.4 27.7 12.5 17.8 9.3 17.3 25.3 30.7 12.9 Health Science Health Science Human Service Business, Management and Administration Business, Management and Administration Education and Training Health Science Business, Management and Administration Human Service Marketing Sales and Service Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics Manufacturing Career Architecture and Construction Business, Management and Administration See handout for complete list. Education/Experience/On-the-Job (OJT) Training Associate's Bachelor's Bachelor's Bachelor's degree Bachelor's degree+1-5 yrs exp Bachelor's+Internship Doctoral or professional degree HS/GED+1-5 yrs exp HS/GED+1-5 yrs exp HS/GED+1-5 yrs exp HS/GED+1-5 yrs exp+short OJT HS/GED+long OJT HS/GED+moderate OJT HS/GED+moderate OJT
  • 21. Declining Occupations By numerical change Top 20 Projected Declining Occupations in the Upper Savannah WIA Area, 2010-2020 Textile Knitting and Weaving Machine Setters, Operators, and Tenders Textile Winding, Twisting, and Drawing Out Machine Operators Rehabilitation Counselors Photographic Process Workers and Processing Machine Operators Correctional Officers and Jailers Stock Clerks and Order Fillers Pressers, Textile, Garment, and Related Materials Postal Service Clerks Postal Service Mail Carriers Shipping, Receiving, and Traffic Clerks Switchboard Operators, Including Answering Service Geoscientists, Except Hydrologists and Geographers Postmasters and Mail Superintendents Postal Service Mail Sorters, Processors, and Processing Machine Operators Child, Family, and School Social Workers Data Entry Keyers Forest and Conservation Workers Printing Press Operators Chemical Plant and System Operators Chemical Technicians
  • 22. Educational Requirements for the Top 50 Jobs in USAV WIA Education # of Occs in Top 50 HS/GED 23 Less than HS 16 Postsecondary/vocational training 4 Associate's 1 Bachelor's 5 Doctoral or professional degree 1 39 out of 50 do not require classroom training beyond high school! But remember, many of these occupations do not pay well because they do not require much education.
  • 23. The more you learn, the more you earn!! Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table S1501
  • 24. From the Top 50 Projected Occupations… Good jobs up to and including HS diploma/GED: •Medical Assistants •Truck Drivers, Heavy Duty •Customer Services Representatives •Retail Salespersons •Security Guards •Pharmacy Technicians •Bookkeeping, Accounting and Auditing Clerks
  • 25. Jobs that require Postsecondary/Career Training or an Associate’s Degree • Registered Nurses • Nursing Aides/Orderlies/Attendants • Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) • EMTs and Paramedics • Production Supervisors
  • 26. BUT REMEMBER… The more you learn, the more you earn!! Source: US Census Bureau, American Community Survey, Table S1501
  • 27. Jobs that require a Bachelor’s Degree or higher Elementary School Teachers Industrial Production Managers Accountants & Auditors Medical & Health Services Managers Pharmacists
  • 28. Supply vs. Demand Do we have the correctly-trained population (supply) to fill what employers want (demand)? Education can affect the supply but not the demand. Short-term & Long-term We can look at both short-term and long-term supply and demand.
  • 29. The Comparison Short-term Post-secondary degrees (SC Dept. of Education) vs. Online job ads (Conference Board Help Wanted Online® data series) Long-term Career cluster chosen by high school students (SC Dept. of Education) vs. 2010-2020 Occupational Projections (SC Dept. of Emp. & Workforce) All data are categorized by career clusters for comparison purposes.
  • 30. Supply Cluster Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Architecture and Construction Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications Business, Management and Administration Education and Training Finance Government and Public Administration Health Science Hospitality and Tourism Human Service Information Technology Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Manufacturing Marketing, Sales and Service Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics TOTAL Short-term Supply Post-Secondary Post-Secondary Degrees by Career Degrees by Cluster Newberry Career Cluster in College USAV WIA % % 0.0 2.7 0.0 3.4 6.4 8.2 27.0 7.5 17.6 23.3 0.0 0.7 1.0 2.7 8.8 11.6 2.0 0.7 13.2 14.4 0.0 2.7 0.0 1.4 0.0 3.4 0.0 0.0 24.0 17.1 0.0 0.0 100.0 100.0 Long-term Supply Students with declared cluster % 5.4 6.4 12.8 7.0 5.2 1.0 3.7 25.1 0.7 7.0 1.4 3.9 3.6 0.6 10.3 5.8 100.0 Colleges in the USAV area include Erskine, Lander, Presbyterian, Piedmont Technical, and Newberry.
  • 31. Demand Cluster Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Architecture and Construction Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications Business, Management and Administration Education and Training Finance Government and Public Administration Health Science Hospitality and Tourism Human Service Information Technology Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Manufacturing Marketing, Sales and Service Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics TOTAL Short-term Long-term Demand Demand HWOL for USAV Occ Proj 2010-20, WIA--Last 120 USAV WIA days % % 0.4 3.4 3.6 8.7 2.3 4.2 8.2 13.6 1.3 8.0 2.2 1.9 0.0 0.8 28.6 12.9 8.7 5.3 2.5 6.1 2.2 2.3 1.2 4.2 14.9 14.8 10.8 5.3 7.4 4.9 5.8 3.8 100.0 100.0
  • 32. Supply vs. Demand: The Gaps Short-term Supply Cluster Agriculture, Food and Natural Resource Architecture and Construction Arts, Audio/Video Technology and Communications Business, Management and Administration Education and Training Finance Government and Public Administration Health Science Hospitality and Tourism Human Service Information Technology Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Manufacturing Marketing, Sales and Service Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics TOTAL Short-term Demand 2012 Post2012 PostSecondary Secondary HWOL for Degrees at Degrees in USAV USAV WIA-Newberry College WIA Last 120 days % % % 0.0 2.7 0.4 0.0 3.4 3.6 6.4 8.2 2.3 27.0 7.5 8.2 17.6 23.3 1.3 0.0 0.7 2.2 1.0 2.7 0.0 8.8 11.6 28.6 2.0 0.7 8.7 13.2 14.4 2.5 0.0 2.7 2.2 0.0 1.4 1.2 0.0 3.4 14.9 0.0 0.0 10.8 24.0 17.1 7.4 0.0 0.0 5.8 100.0 100.0 100.0 Long-term Supply Long-term Demand Students with declared cluster USAV WIA % 5.4 6.4 12.8 7.0 5.2 1.0 3.7 25.1 0.7 7.0 1.4 3.9 3.6 0.6 10.3 5.8 100.0 Occ Proj 2010-20, USAV WIA % 3.4 8.7 4.2 13.6 8.0 1.9 0.8 12.9 5.3 6.1 2.3 4.2 14.8 5.3 4.9 3.8 100.0
  • 33. The Gaps Short-term Need fewer post-secondary degrees in Education and Training Need fewer post-secondary degrees in Human Service Need fewer post-secondary degrees in STEM Need more post-secondary degrees in Manufacturing Need more post-secondary degrees in Marketing, Sales and Service Need more post-secondary degrees in Health Science Need more post-secondary degrees in Hospitality and Tourism Long-term Need fewer HS studests choosing Arts, A/V Technology and Communications Need fewer HS studests choosing STEM Need fewer HS studests choosing Health Science Need more HS studests choosing Manufacturing Need more HS studests choosing Business, Management and Administration A comment about STEM… Think lower-level technologists/technicians—they will still be needed. Keep an eye out for new manufacturing companies coming to the area which may create a demand for STEM workers.
  • 34. Certificates in Online Job Ads (Upper Savannah WIA) Commercial Driver's License Certified Registered Nurse Certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Physical Therapist Certification Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Licensed Practical Nurse Pharmacy Technician Better Business Bureau Occupational Safety & Health Administration Certification Speech and Language Pathologist 6 of the top 10 requested certificates are healthcare-related
  • 35. Soft Skills Requested by Employers (Upper Savannah WIA) Oral and written communication skills Customer service oriented Detail oriented Cash registers Team-oriented, teamwork Problem solving Cash handling Organizational skills Troubleshooting Self-starting / Self-motivated
  • 36. What about the long-term unemployed? The Long-Term Unemployed by Education & Age Education: Lots of potential to bring the long-term unemployed from HS/GED and Associate’s/Some college up to a Bachelor’s Degree. Age: Interesting that 30-34 yr. range is higher then drops and climbs again in the 45-59 yr. range. Less Than 9th Grade 9th to 12th No Diploma High School Graduate Associates Degree/Some College Bachelors Degree Graduate Degree Unknown Newberry 1.1 14.1 42.4 22.8 3.3 0.0 16.3 USAV 0.8 12.5 43.0 18.2 4.7 0.6 20.2 19 or younger 20-24 25-29 30-34 35-39 40-44 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80+ Unknown Newberry 0 9 8 11 8 6 13 11 11 3 6 3 1 0 2 USAV 1 61 81 98 75 70 82 86 61 50 27 19 4 1 7
  • 37. How to Help the Long-Term Unemployed DEW recently produced a study on the long-term or chronically unemployed and entertained ideas of how to help them rejoin the workforce. Highlights of that study concluded that: •Employers perception of candidates may be an obstacle. They would rather hire someone fresh out of college than someone who has been out of the workplace for a long time and whose skills they may think have atrophied. DEW works with hundreds of employers through our Business Services Division and can explain the benefits of services such as apprenticeships, OJT programs, business tax credits, and Federal bonding. •Jobseekers will also need to be up to speed on job search skills in order to get their foot in the door. In addition to resume writing, DEW plans to offer/will continue to offer training (computer, social media, interviewing skills, job and soft skills training), networking opportunities, and encourage volunteering.
  • 38. Identifying the Educational Needs of Adult Learners • According to the National Center for Educational Statistics, over the next decade “…there will be a 23% increase in the number of adult students attending degree-granting, post-secondary institutions and only a 9% increase in ‘traditional’ students.” • About 43.5 million people aged 25 and older in the US have some post-secondary education but no degree. • In the Upper Savannah area, 55.8% have a high school diploma/GED up to an Associate’s Degree. • “Degree completion” is what many adults need to start or rejoin the world of work. • The USAV area is rich in manufacturing employment with 39 occupations on the growing list for 2020, but only 5 of those 39 manufacturing occupations require an Associate’s or Bachelor’s Degree. • Employers in the area have needs in Marketing and Sales (especially sales management and sales that require additional knowledge) that are not matched in post-secondary training. • Managers and first-line supervisors in retail establishments and specific knowledge of insurance, advertising, and real estate are needed in sales.
  • 39. What Do Adult Learners Need? Five Most Critical Needs of Adult Students From an article by Victoria Berling, Executive Director of Educational Outreach, Northern Kentucky University 1.Programming that works with their schedules and locations: Flexible scheduling and delivery to allow adult learners to continue working and/or caring for family is a major need. 2.Relevant degree programs: Programs need to be aligned with their life and work goals. 3.Clear expectations: They do not want to waste time so they need to know what you want from them! 4.Feedback from instructors: Lack of confidence in a classroom setting makes adult learners need reassurance in their performance. 5.Acknowledgement of prior learning: To recognize experience and decrease costs, they want to earn credits through portfolio and/or testing options.
  • 40. Where can we find more information? SC Department of Employment and Workforce, Labor Market Information (LMI): www.scworkforceinfo.com U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics: www.bls.gov US Census Bureau: www.census.gov O*Net: www.onetonline.org
  • 41. Community Profiles
  • 42. Community Profiles (con’t.) A profile of your area is only three clicks away! 1. Click on “Community Profile Report.” 2. Select your geographic area. 3. Click on “View Report.” Comprehensive 20+page report contains:  Economic Data  Demographic Data  Industry Data  Occupational Projections Data  Educational Data
  • 43. Hands-on Tools •• •• •• •• •• •• •• •• Business, Administration and Legal Business, Administration and Legal Construction Construction Engineering Engineering Healthcare Healthcare Information Technology Information Technology Installation, Maintenance & Repair Installation, Maintenance & Repair Manufacturing Manufacturing Transportation, Distribution & Warehousing Transportation, Distribution & Warehousing Feel free to download or print from the LMI website.
  • 44. Information is Power! Power Pages •Jobseekers •Employers •Educators •Economic Development •Entrepreneurs
  • 45. www.bls.gov
  • 46. www.bls.gov •Use “Subject Area” tab to see a list of all topics on the website •Resources for Students or Teachers: Occupational Outlook Handbook & Occupational Outlook Quarterly; Recent articles include: Math at Work and Careers in Online Creativity Spotlight on Statistics (might be good for a math class!): Effects of Hurricane Sandy and Fashion
  • 47. www.census.gov
  • 48. www.census.gov For Teachers (www.census.gov/schools/for_teachers/) •Lesson Plans — Please check back often for new Census in Schools' lessons and information to help teachers and students learn about the importance of the 2010 Census. •Teaching Ideas — Ideas for you to incorporate census information into the classroom. History, graphing, collecting and understanding data, and more! •What High School Teachers Need to Know [PDF] — High School teachers, the Census Bureau has written a handbook just for you on how to understand and use American Community Survey data. •History of the U.S. Census — Learn how the census has changed from the first census of 1790 to the upcoming Census 2010. •Facts for Features — Share little known tidbits of information with your students. A compilation of facts about special days including anniversaries and observances such as Women's History month, Cinco de Mayo, Back to School, and more. •Distribution of U.S. Cities: 1790 to 2000 — Discussing history or geography? Share with your students a series of 22 maps showing changes in the size and distribution of American cities between 1790 and 2000. •QuickFacts — Quick, easy access to facts for students and teachers to learn about people, business, and geography for the nation or your state, county, or large city. •Broadcast, Photo, and Radio Services — Easy-to-access research opportunities include photos and videos as well as Profile America, a popular, daily, 60-second, bilingual feature with stories celebrating key observances or monthly commemorations using information collected by the Census Bureau
  • 49. QUESTIONS?
  • 50. South Carolina Dept. of Employment & Workforce Labor Market Information Department (803) 737-2660 or 1-800-205-9290 www.scworkforceinfo.com Lorraine Faulds: lfaulds@dew.sc.gov