Ari Popper: Me to-We-research

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Ari Popper, President of Brainjuicer US, talks about how to move from research to we-search.

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  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • The Granddaddy of Predictive Markets is the Iowa Electronic Market; 500 mainly white middle aged guys buying and selling shares to predict the results of elections
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Truly Quali-Quant approach – robust analysis with depth of insight Innovation specialist , with focus at front end Continual R&D thought BrainJuicer Labs Ground breaking new techniques & methodologies Recognised by winning prestigious research awards Twice Winner of the ESOMAR Best Methodology Paper (2005 & 2007) - the only agency to achieve this in the last 20 years. Most Innovative Use of Technology Award Service Business of the Year
  • Truly Quali-Quant approach – robust analysis with depth of insight Innovation specialist , with focus at front end Continual R&D thought BrainJuicer Labs Ground breaking new techniques & methodologies Recognised by winning prestigious research awards Twice Winner of the ESOMAR Best Methodology Paper (2005 & 2007) - the only agency to achieve this in the last 20 years. Most Innovative Use of Technology Award Service Business of the Year
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Innovation communities: The professional / semi-professional: InnoCentive and NineSigma The ‘crowdsourcing’ sites: Cambrian House and Kluster Brand sites: MyStarbucks and Walkers’ ‘Do us a flavour’
  • Innovation communities: The professional / semi-professional: InnoCentive and NineSigma The ‘crowdsourcing’ sites: Cambrian House and Kluster Brand sites: MyStarbucks and Walkers’ ‘Do us a flavour’
  • Innovation communities: The professional / semi-professional: InnoCentive and NineSigma The ‘crowdsourcing’ sites: Cambrian House and Kluster Brand sites: MyStarbucks and Walkers’ ‘Do us a flavour’
  • Afternoon everyone. I’d like to open by telling you a quick story about Swedish drivers. Swedish learners have to undergo a rigorous driving test, which is taken in three parts in the following order: First, a slippery road test – 4hrs of theory and practical driving exercises in slippery or hazardous road conditions Second, a theory test of 65 questions requiring a pass rate of 80%. This can only be scheduled after you have taken 14 pre-tests. Finally, a 45 minute driving test , which includes three additional mini tests relating to your car – an engine check, an inside car check and a light check. This driving test can only be taken after you have driven at least once with an instructor and demonstrated that you are ready to take the test. So is it any wonder that Swedish drivers think that they are pretty good drivers? In actual fact, Swedish drivers are so confident, that when surveyed, 50% of them believe themselves to be in the best 10% of drivers in the country. It’s perfectly understandable that they should feel this way, but quite obviously an impossibility. And I’m similar stories could be told about how good we think we are as lovers. The truth is that we humans are self-deceit machines . We are very poor witnesses to our own behaviour and to our own motivations. But central to most of our market research tools is the belief that the best way to elicit the truth is to observe or ask individuals for their own opinions, motivations and predicted behaviour. At the same time, the latest social science and evolutionary psychology is showing the degree to which humans are a ‘we’ species with an incredibly well developed ability to observe others, quickly assess people and a situation and predict people’s future behaviour . As Scottish Poet, Robert Burns put it, ‘Oh, that God the gift would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. So here is the thought. Why don’t we set out to see people as they are seen by others? Why do we insist on asking people for their own motivations, to predict their own reactions and behaviours? Would it not be a fairer depiction of life – attitudes and behaviours – if we were to frame our research to obtain a more accurate picture of reality, untarnished by our own distorted view of ourselves? Imagine a philosophy that moved us from asking respondents for opinions about themselves, to one where we valued the individual for their judgement, powers of observation and their view of the world. In essence, we would be moving from ‘Me Research’ to ‘We Research’ – a more inclusive view of our respondents as participants. In 'We' research we never ask people about themselves, only what they've noticed, think or predict about others. This philosophy might underpin many areas of research. Mass prediction would require the broadest and most diverse possible sample, as outlined by James Surowiecki in his book ‘the Wisdom of Crowds’. The theory of The Wisdom of Crowds has already been shown to work and to have validity as a predictor of new product success in market. Mass Ethnography would harness people’s natural observational abilities to turn respondents into an army of effective ethnographic researchers. We might use online ‘listening and observing’ training techniques to encourage people’s natural talent and we might be able to show how large numbers of people can be identified, trained, deputized and deployed to assess the dynamics and behaviour of consumers in any given category, providing companies with fresh and commercially valuable insights. Mass semiotics would take mass ethnography one stage further by identifying naturally gifted semioticians – all those who can go beyond insightful observation to join the dots of what it all means and provide provocative platforms for creating brand growth. Our challenge here would be to develop a method of identifying naturally gifted semioticians and to find simple frameworks and ways of training them to deliver commercial quality insights. Finally ‘Co-creation’. Our work over the last few years in this area has shown that creativity is an aptitude like any other and that only a very small proportion of the population are naturally gifted creatives with a real talent for coming up with new ideas. Perhaps we can forge a new type of research with a new type of respondent, and move beyond the me towards the we.
  • Ari Popper: Me to-We-research

    1. 1. How to do ‘ We’search…?
    2. 2. A New Way of Looking… e research W
    3. 3. Unreliable witnesses…
    4. 4. Social animals…
    5. 5. Social Animals… ‘ Oh, the gift that God would give us, to see ourselves as others see us’. Robert Burns
    6. 6. We Research Co-creation Net- Nography Mass Ethnography Mass Prediction
    7. 7. We Research Mass Prediction
    8. 8. IEM - the original Predictive Market X 596 Polls (1988 - 2000)  ¾ Award Winner 2005 2007
    9. 9. ‘ Imagine you owned shares in all these ideas...’ Probably Buy Shares In... Probably Sell Shares In... One To Double Shares In... One To Sell All Shares In... Net Preference % % Provides Normable Benchmark
    10. 10. Predictive Markets Conclusions <ul><ul><li>Proven accuracy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater discrimination </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can spot breakthrough ideas </li></ul></ul>279 Head-2-Head experiments across 15 Categories Award Winner 2007 2007
    11. 11. Same Winners as Monadic Testing 5 out of 7 28 Air Care 9 out of 10 20 Lighting 2 out of 2 5 Air Care 1.5 out of 2 8 Drinks 5 out of 5 10 Cleaners x137 7 29 11 42 x48 11 15 Ideas x 4 out of 4 Gum 3 out of 3 Chilled Food 8.1 out of 10 6.5 out of 9 Cleaners 8 out of 12 Telecoms Sequential 9.1 out of 10 1 out of 2 Waters 5 out of 5 Snacks No. of Green Light Concepts Monadic
    12. 12. Impressive Record of Predicting In-Market Reality 0.94 0.87 Correlation 1.1% 32 47 E 4.5% 46 42 D 3.4% 51 42 C 7.9% 63 54 B 12.2% 83 59 A Share Results Predictive Market Monadic Test New Concepts
    13. 13. Greater discrimination vs. monadic tests <ul><li>Please select which one of these ideas you would immediately sell / double your shares in </li></ul>Total Sample: 500 Flat line monadic scores Wheat from chaff PM scores
    14. 14. Spot Potentially Breakthrough Ideas .87 Correlation with Opening Week box Office
    15. 15. We Research Mass Ethnography Mass Prediction
    16. 18. Mens’ Health Multivitamin Mass Ethnography Study ‘ Carlos’ Lay Ethnographer
    17. 19. We Research Net- Nography Mass Ethnography Mass Prediction
    18. 20. Swine Flu - Medical Virus vs. Mind Virus 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 11 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 April 22: April Mexican Health Ministry nationwide alert ▼ April 28: WHO raise pandemic threat level ▼ 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Medical virus spread Mind virus spread overlap 12 April 1 May 1 Day 20
    19. 21. Consequences of a Mind Virus
    20. 22. Introducing DigiViduals
    21. 23. Please meet Nicole Nicole is our own creation – a DigiVidual™. Although she looks and feels real, we have created her. Nicole is alive on the web. She tweets and looks for people on Twitter whose tweets match her key words and emotions. If she finds a tweet that matches her profile; she picks it up and re-tweets it on Twitter as her own. So she picks up what real consumers feel and write about in their personal life. Get short, timely messages from Nicole Nicole
    22. 24. On Nicole’s Twitter page we find re-tweets from people who talk like Nicole; providing understanding of what moves people in their daily life Savage Tribes Decorative Aromatherapy Candles Nicole
    23. 25. Nicole’s Lifeboard: Nicole Cute, domestic Sociable, romantic Village life Coffee, chocolate Delicate, colourful, quirky, intricate Edgy, Gothic, dark Social conscience Mythical, labyrinthine adventures
    24. 26. Nicole Narrative Nicole is fascinated by design, fashion and craft objects. She’s genuine, sociable and has an infectious zest for life. She’s a magpie – alive to the joy that little things can bring. She can often be found hanging out in the cooler parts of town – a source of inspiration for her. She loves the buzz of the big city but revels in the intimacy that the urban village provides. She is very popular but has a close circle of friends who admire her warmth, elegance and generosity. Nicole Female Age 38 Lives London Profession Jewellery Designer Lives Hammersmith Insight “ There are times in my life when I need to say sorry or cheer up a friend and or be coquettish or just plain silly. Wouldn't it be great to express my sentiments creatively in candy”. Theme Creative Kitsch
    25. 27. Nicole
    26. 28. Bring Segmentation Study To Life…
    27. 29. We Research Co-creation Net- Nography Mass Ethnography Mass Prediction
    28. 30. Goldcorp Red Lake Mine…
    29. 31. Do you know this man?
    30. 32. What can you outsource via a ‘American Idol model’ … <ul><li>Source talent from the crowd </li></ul><ul><li>Screen for potential </li></ul><ul><li>Own the output </li></ul>
    31. 33. The Netflix Prize
    32. 35. Stop the kids lying through their teeth!
    33. 36. A New Way of Looking… e research W

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