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Lattice Energy LLC- Collective Many-body Q-M Neutrino Antennas-Jan 10 2012
 

Lattice Energy LLC- Collective Many-body Q-M Neutrino Antennas-Jan 10 2012

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Please imagine that a neutron-rich nucleus unstable to beta-decay behaves dynamically as if it were a collective, many-body quantum system that continuously ‘senses’ or ‘interrogates’ what is ...

Please imagine that a neutron-rich nucleus unstable to beta-decay behaves dynamically as if it were a collective, many-body quantum system that continuously ‘senses’ or ‘interrogates’ what is present in its nearby local continuum (immediate physical environment) through nuclear decay channels that are quantum mechanically connected (via local entanglement) to the ‘outside’ world (the local continuum).
In effect, such unstable nuclei must perform a rudimentary form of dynamic quantum computation in order to be able to ‘decide’ exactly when they can move toward a lower-energy entropic state, i.e. decay, given the possible presence of local temporal constraints on decay, e.g., fermionic decay ‘frustration’ that results from operation of the well-known Pauli Exclusion Principle.

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  • Dear Pierre:

    Congratulations! You are very perceptive!

    Yes, if the rate of neutrino emissions from a source can be controlled and reliably modulated with fine-scale control of rates, and you combine that with an appropriately resonant neutrino 'antenna' structure located at some distance from the modulated source, you then have the rudiments of a neutrino-based communication system, assuming that it is technologically feasible to build reliably working, practical versions of such system components.

    While initial 'early adopter' applications for such neutrino detection and communication technology might well be military (for obvious reasons that do not have to be explicitly enumerated here), if it could in fact be successfully commercialized for communications applications and such systems had enough communications bandwidth to be useful (in terms of bits per second or some such measure), it would be a nice capability to have in a transmit/receive system if one wanted to be able to communicate to some distant location (wherever) and have the least possible signal attenuation along the way.

    In that regard, such systems would be handy to have for long-distance interstellar communication over long time periods. I have no idea whether there are presently any advanced intelligent technological civilizations sharing our galaxy with us. However, if they're really out there somewhere, and if neutrino communications are physically realizable (which is still very uncertain until vastly more experimental R&D is conducted), then I would suspect that they might at least be announcing their presence with some sort of a societal neutrino 'beacon' transmitting, 'Hey, hello! We're here! Say hi back to us!'

    Which prompts another thought: maybe astronomers have been looking in the wrong parts of the interstellar electromagnetic spectrum for signs of intelligent life or machines? Maybe space around us is crackling with messages from other civilization's modulated neutrino transmissions and we just don't know it yet? Something to ponder, no doubt.

    Thanks for your interest in our work.

    Best regards,

    Lew Larsen
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  • With a powerful enough neutrino source, a way to modulate neutrinos emission rate (via laser light excitation of hydride surface?), and neutrinos antennas, one would have a way to communicate via neutrinos; benefits would be mostly military I guess...
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    Lattice Energy LLC- Collective Many-body Q-M Neutrino Antennas-Jan 10 2012 Lattice Energy LLC- Collective Many-body Q-M Neutrino Antennas-Jan 10 2012 Document Transcript

    • Lattice Energy LLC New possibilities for developing minimal mass, extremely sensitive, collective many-body, quantum mechanical neutrino ‘antennas’ Lewis Larsen President and CEO January 10, 2012Technical references:Peer-reviewed:“Perturbation of nuclear decay rates during the solar flare of 13 December 2006,” J. Jenkins and E.Fischbach, Astroparticle Physics 31 pp. 407 - 411 (2009)http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/0808/0808.3156.pdf“A primer for electroweak induced low-energy nuclear reactions,” Y. N. Srivastava, A. Widom, and L.Larsen, Pramana - Journal of Physics 75 (4) pp. 617 – 637 (2010)http://www.ias.ac.in/pramana/v75/p617/fulltext.pdfNot peer-reviewed:“Claimed observations of variations in rates of nuclear β-decay; Evidence for dynamic behavior of nucleiresponding to their immediate physical environment?”Lewis Larsen, Lattice Energy LLC, June 3, 2011 [88 slides - Jenkins & Fischbach‟s paper also discussed]http://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llc-changes-in-solar-neutrino-fluxes-alter-nuclear-betadecay-rates-on-earthjune-3-2011“Nucleosynthetic networks beginning with Nickel „seed‟ nuclei, why cascades of fast beta-decays areimportant, and why end-products of LENR networks are mostly stable isotopes”Lewis Larsen, Lattice Energy LLC, March 24, 2011 [25 slides --- see especially Slides #6 - 8]http://www.slideshare.net/lewisglarsen/lattice-energy-llcnickel-seed-wl-lenr-nucleosynthetic-networkmarch-24-2011State-of-the-art using neutrino emissions to detect locations of fission reactors:Please see the following preprints and PowerPoint conference presentations:http://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/1011/1011.3850v1.pdfhttp://aap2011.in2p3.fr/Program_files/SNIF-IAEA2011_T.Lasserre.pdfhttp://arxiv.org/PS_cache/arxiv/pdf/1101/1101.2755v4.pdfhttp://aap2011.in2p3.fr/Program_files/lasserre_AAP2011_RAA.pdfLattice’s speculative theoretical conjectures about the behavior of beta-unstable nuclei:Please imagine that a neutron-rich nucleus unstable to beta-decay behaves dynamically as if it were acollective, many-body quantum system that continuously „senses‟ or „interrogates‟ what is present in itsnearby local continuum (immediate physical environment) through nuclear decay channels that arequantum mechanically connected (via local entanglement) to the „outside‟ world (the local continuum).In effect, such unstable nuclei must perform a rudimentary form of dynamic quantum computation inorder to be able to „decide‟ exactly when they can move toward a lower-energy entropic state, i.e. decay,given the possible presence of local temporal constraints on decay, e.g., fermionic decay „frustration‟ thatresults from operation of the well-known Pauli Exclusion Principle.Lattice Energy LLC Copyright 2012 All rights reserved Page 1
    • Lattice Energy LLCTo clarify: this so-called fermionic „frustration‟ may occur when a given nucleus is temporarily unable tobeta decay at a particular instant in time because a fermion, that is, an antineutrino and/or an energeticelectron, is/are both physically present nearby within the “local continuum” and are in effectively the samequantum state as the aborning decay product(s). In order to finally decay, such a nucleus must simply„wait in limbo‟ until an unoccupied „slot‟ opens-up in the local continuum; hence it must „monitor‟ status ofthe outside world through its Q-M decay channel „sensors‟ in order to „know‟ when it is OK to do so.Key theoretical question: for Q-M nuclear „decision making‟ purposes, how do we know exactly where abeta-unstable nucleus‟ “local continuum” effectively begins and ends? Does it begin at the quantummechanically „fuzzy‟ outer boundaries of the atomic nucleus proper? Or does it really begin much furtherout and away from the minuscule nucleus itself --- say just beyond the fuzzy quantum mechanicalboundaries of the very last occupied outer (valence) electron shell? Or does it begin even further awayfrom a given unstable atom?Jenkins & Fischbach’s published experimental data appears consistent with conjectures: 54About 99.99% of Mn atoms decay (half-life ~312 days) via K-shell electron capture, which involves theweak interaction as follows: Mn + e  Cr + νe. Recall that neutrinos obey Fermi-Dirac statistics (they 54 54 54behave like Fermions); given that constraint, in order to successfully decay, a Mn nucleus must be ableto emit an electron neutrino (νe) into an unoccupied fermionic state in the local continuum. If all such localstates are momentarily filled, a given nucleus cannot decay until an unoccupied „slot‟ opens-up. Now 54imagine a Mn atom located on earth bathed in a more-or-less steady-state, „bright‟ flux of electron 54neutrinos coming from the direction of the Sun. At every instant, unstable Mn atoms are quantummechanically interrogating the local continuum „world‟ outside the nuclei via the electron capture channel 54in order to „decide‟ whether it is permissible to decay by emitting a neutrino. In doing so, a given Mnatom‟s internal „nuclear decay clock‟ is effectively modified by changes in fine details of „nearby‟ externalneutrino fluxes in terms of experimentally observed decay rates of such atoms. -For example, imagine that a very large flare occurred on the Sun in which copious weak interactions e + +p  lepton + X took place via the Widom-Larsen many-body collective magnetic mechanism. Furthersuppose that the energy spectrum of such a „bright‟ burst of electron neutrinos emitted from the specific 54flare that occurred during their experiment strongly overlapped the normal spectrum emitted by Mnnuclei. In that event, one might expect that a measurable temporary decrease would occur in the decay 54rates of Mn nuclei in a macroscopic sample being monitored experimentally on earth. In fact, this 54occurred in Jenkins & Fischbach‟s Mn sample. This result suggests that the Widom-Larsen collectivemagnetic mechanism could have operated in the large solar flare that was temporally coincident with the 54statistically significant perturbations in the Mn nuclear decay rate observed by Jenkins & Fischbach. 54Importantly, Jenkins & Fischbach‟s experimental data on Mn allows has enabled them to workbackwards and calculate an estimated effective interaction cross-section of electron neutrinos coming +from e- + p  lepton + X reactions in the solar flare (which are predicted by W-L theory published in 54 54Pramana) impinging Mn atoms present in their measured sample of Mn over the time interval of themeasurements. The apparent cross-section that emerges from their straightforward calculation is on the 9 10order of ~10 - 10 times larger than what one would expect with „normal‟ interactions between neutrinosand atomic nuclei. How can one explain this unexpected and deeply anomalous result? 54If the above-explained theoretical conjectures were true, and if the “local continuum” that Mn nucleiexposed to a distant electron neutrino point source (located in the co-temporal solar flare) „see‟ really 54begins just a little ways beyond the fuzzy quantum mechanical boundaries of a Mn atom„s very last 54occupied outer (valence) electron shell (i.e., the entire Mn atom), then one might consequently expectthat the value of the cross-sectional area (πr ) of the entire Mn atom divided by the cross-sectional area 2 54(πr ) occupied by a Mn nucleus should be about the same magnitude as the anomalously high neutrino 2 54interaction cross-section suggested by Jenkins & Fischbach‟s experimental data. That is in fact the case: 9 10amazingly, both numerical values are very similar at 10 - 10 . It is unlikely that this is just a coincidence.Lattice Energy LLC Copyright 2012 All rights reserved Page 2
    • Lattice Energy LLCImplications if experimental data and Lattice conjectures are validated by further work:Widom-Larsen theory and Jenkins & Fischbach‟s experimental data suggest that weak-interaction-baseddetection devices could potentially be designed and built to function as passive, many-body, collectivequantum mechanical neutrino „antennae‟ with very high neutrino interaction efficiencies, as well as highdirectional sensitivity and energetic specificity to neutrino fluxes emitted from distant point sources (in 9 10theory, more sensitive than existing neutrino detectors by a factor of ~10 - 10 ). This could potentially bea game-changer in the technological ability to monitor neutrino fluxes of interest in the context of WMDand nuclear proliferation issues, as well as basic science research such as measuring solar neutrinos.Intriguing and possibly important practical applications for this detection technology:If prototype detectors based on these new insights can successfully „image‟ fixed, land-based fissionreactors in preliminary experiments, then with further development it would seem possible that one mighteventually be able to successfully detect the locations of moving neutrino sources located anywhere inthe near-earth environment. Techniques to estimate neutrino spectral „signatures‟ for various types offission reactors have already been developed; some such signatures have also been measured.If these new types of Q-M-based neutrino detection and measurement systems finally achievedsatisfactory sensitivity/reliability and were practical and cost-effective to engineer, and since such Q-Mneutrino antennas could likely be ultra compact and relatively low-mass, they could potentially bedeployed on various types of mobile platforms to mitigate global nuclear proliferation risks by identifyingand locating undeclared or clandestine fission reactors.Extremely large fixed installations at underground sites could collect and measure neutrino data thatmight help improve our understanding of nuclear processes operating in and around the sun, as well asperhaps provide the first lineaments of future neutrino telescopes that might eventually be sensitiveenough to resolve „neutrino images‟ of nearby stars and examine other objects of interest in our galaxy.POCs for further questions:Lewis Larsen, Lattice Energy LLC, lewisglarsen@gmail.com, (312) 861 - 0115Jere Jenkins, Director - Radiation Laboratory, Purdue University, jere@purdue.edu, (765) 496 - 3573Prof. Ephraim Fischbach, Physics Dept., Purdue University, ephraim@purdue.edu, (765) 494 - 5506Lattice Energy LLC Copyright 2012 All rights reserved Page 3