Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017
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Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017

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Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017

Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017

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  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I added a few “other support teams” to your original list. Re the editorial team, I would probably take Lori out of the list. I’m assuming also that the Report Development and Coordination Team (you, me, and ?????) are the writers. The editors would review what we write and make word smithing and formatting recommendations.I would move Brett from logistics to Resource RoomLori and Ann should probably head up print production.Etc – we can talk about this when we get a chance
  • I think we should do the project task list first, then revise the timeline. Don’t know that we actually need a calendar. Maybe just the matrix that you used.
  • I wasn’t sure where you were going with the two volumes you had, so this is my rendering of what I think the report outline would be. Question: What you had as chapter 2 (Overview of Criteria for Accreditation: Statements indicating LC meets current accreditation requirements), I left out. Is this something we’re directed to include?

Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017 Lewis and Clark Community College Strategic Plan 2013-2017 Presentation Transcript

  • Five-Year Strategic Plan FY 2013-2017 April 27, 2012
  • Contents 2 Executive Summary ............................................................. 3-7 Main Report  Introduction / Background ............................................................. 8-14  Mission, Purposes, Vision, Values ............................................................. 15-19  Environmental Scan ............................................................. 20-23  Goals and Strategies ............................................................. 24-25  Strategic Projects ............................................................. 26-28  Implementation Plan ............................................................. 29-30  Next Steps ............................................................. 31-33 APPENDIX A: Mission and Values Commentary ............................................................. 34-40 L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 3 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Executive Summary 4 Introduction Lewis & Clark Community College is an achievement driven institution, thoroughly dedicated to student success and the continuing quality-of-life and prosperity of the communities it serves. A high level of achievement is encouraged and facilitated by supportive leadership and employees who are routinely innovative and entrepreneurial. This document is a testimony to L&C’s commitment to transparent, candid, and open self-examination. As an institution, L&C has over the years shown remarkable agility and adaptability in response to new and emerging challenges and opportunities. We are confident that it will continue to do so as it strives for even higher levels of quality and performance over the five-years of this plan (FY 2013-2017) and into the future. This strategic plan defines L&C’s strategic priorities for the next five years. It is important to recognize that while this plan directs attention and resources to four areas of strategic focus, it is not meant to understate continuing operations involving mission critical functions, including infrastructure development and maintenance. This plan is a complementary extension of ongoing operations that puts special emphasis on strategically important issues. The plan addresses challenges and opportunities that reflect existing and emerging forces for change and L&C’s ongoing aspirations to continuous improvement and higher levels of performance and achievement. This plan was developed concurrently with the Self-Study for Reaccreditation project and is closely aligned with the criteria established by L&C’s accrediting agency, the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCACS). This close alignment of the two projects has had a synergy effect that greatly improved the quality of both projects, the strategic plan and the self-study. Acknowledgements This plan could not have been completed without the selfless contribution of many individuals, including board members (both L&C Trustees and the Foundation Board), administration, faculty, staff, and students. A special thanks goes to the twenty-member steering committee that endured four 4-hour workshops and much additional behind-the- scenes work to apply their broad expertise, discerning insights, and innovative thinking to the planning effort. We would also like to acknowledge the L&C Board of Trustees. Without their continuing encouragement and support this project would not have been possible. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Executive Summary, continued. 5 Background The planning process was guided by three fundamental principles to ensure close alignment with L&C’s mission, vision and values; to ensure that participation is inclusive; and that recommendations are actionable given the College’s existing and anticipated future resources and capabilities. The process brought together many elements with singular continuity stretching from initial findings to tentative conclusions to recommended goals and strategies. The project timeline spanned nine months and consisted of eight major steps that, along the way, engaged board members, students, faculty, and staff, and invited public comment. The planning was facilitated by Tom Wunderle, Institutional Planning and Effectiveness, and Dr. George Banziger, consultant. They were assisted by a 20-member steering committee consisting of the president, the executive cabinet and senior administrators and faculty. In the data collection phase, the team conducted / administered 47 interviews, 4 workshops, 638 surveys, 6 focus groups, and 4 presentations / briefings (SGA, In-Service, Board of Trustees, Foundation Board, and Managers). The team also contributed an article to the student newspaper (The Bridge), reviewed a number of strategic documents, and posted the plan on the website for public view and comment. Reaffirming the Mission, Purposes, Vision, and Values At the December 7 steering committee workshop, all agreed that the current Mission statement was still relevant, accurate, and sufficiently inspirational, and therefore should not be changed. It was also agreed that some form of “commentary” on the mission and values would help others better understand the meaning and implications of those expressions of institutional purpose and values (see Appendix A: Mission and Values Commentary) Mission Empower people by raising aspirations and fostering achievement through dynamic, compassionate, and responsible learning experiences It was, however, recommended that the Purposes be revised to replace “bulleted statements” with complete sentences, to include more direct references to adult and developmental education, and otherwise to improve the readability of the document. Revised Purposes 1.Prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities 2. Prepare students for entry into the workforce, career advancement or career change through technical certificate and associate degree programs 3. Provide adult basic education, general education development (GED), developmental, and other instruction that prepares students for college level course work 4. Provide programs and experiences that foster individual development through job skills and lifelong learning skills to meet the demands of a global, technology- driven, and knowledge-based economy 5. Provide a learning environment that is supported by teaching excellence, high quality student services, and well-equipped and maintained instructional facilities 6. Support education and research activities and the economic development of the district and the State of Illinois through partnerships and community service programs 7. Contribute to the advancement and well-being of the citizens of the district through cultural, civic, and professional activities L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Executive Summary, continued. 6 Reaffirming the Mission, Purposes, Values, continued. It was also agreed on December 7 to make minor changes to the Vision, including the replacement of the phrase “we aspire” to a more bold and confidant “we are” in the introduction to the vision Revised Vision We are the preeminent provider of relevant, high quality learning experiences to the communities we serve. The College combines the best of the traditional and the modern to provide an environment that is accessible and highly conducive to learning, social interaction, personal enrichment, physical development, and job skills enhancement. Programs and support services are carefully designed to serve the current and evolving needs of our students. Faculty and staff exemplify the highest standards of service and performance and take pride in the achievement of our students and the College as a whole. Our actions reflect Lewis and Clark’s core values of service, respect, responsibility, compassion and integrity. We hold ourselves accountable for our performance as educators and as stewards of the resources entrusted to us. The true measure of our performance is the personal and academic success of our students, the overall well-being and cultural enrichment of the communities we serve, and the economic vitality of the region. Based on survey data and feedback from focus groups, the steering committee recommended a revision of the Core Values to remove “fairness” and “truth,” and add “service” and “integrity.” As with the mission themes, commentary was written for each of the values to help others understand their meaning and implications (see Appendix A: Mission and Values Commentary). Revised Core Values Service, Respect, Responsibility, Compassion, and Integrity On February 14, 2012, the Board of Trustees formally approved the revisions to the Purposes, Vision, and Values. Environmental Scan The environmental scan identified change drivers, mandates, strengths, opportunities and challenges. The planning team identified 21 change drivers and mandates that demand our attention because of their potential impact on students, college operations, and institutional priorities in general. Examples include: the economy, jobs and unemployment, globalization, changing demographics, rapid changes in technology, and climate change. In addition, a number of strengths were identified, including L&C’s beautiful campuses, the Board of Trustees and the L&C Foundation, value and affordability, culture of informed decision-making, leadership, and public engagement and contributions to the local economy. A number of challenges were identified, many stemming from a review of the change drivers and mandates. These include: the economy’s impact on the budget, students, and jobs; the anticipation of large numbers of returning military who will need to be served, increasing demand for accountability, and increasing poverty and the growing economic divide. Looking internally, the team identified opportunities to improve the quality of services, management practices, communications, institutional research, and continuous improvement among other challenges. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Executive Summary, continued. 7 Goals and Strategies Based on findings from analysis up to this point, the steering committee developed four strategic goals. Strategic Goals 1. Student Academic Success: Improve student success as measured by key success indicators 2. Institutional Quality and Effectiveness: Improve the quality and effectiveness of everything we do 3. Career and Job Readiness: Improve the curriculum and support services to better equip students to obtain jobs and advance their careers 4. Public Engagement and Service Leadership: Increase the level of public engagement to drive quality-of-life, civic, and other improvements Strategic Projects The goals are supported by 32 strategies that were eventually “folded” into 15 strategic projects. The following lists the projects and the strategic goals they support: 1. Student Success Initiative (Goals 1 and 3) 2. Student Financial Assistance (Goals 1 and 3) 3. Continuous Quality Improvement (Goals 1-4) 4. Institutional Quality and Effectiveness (Goals 1-4) 5. Knowledge and Information Management (Goals 1-4) 6. Student Career and Job Readiness (Goal 3) 7. Strengthen Management Practices (Goal 2) 8. Advance Institutional Research (Goal 2) 9. Internal Communications (Goal 2) 10.Staffing and Workload Management (Goal 2) 11.Modeling Sustainable Practices (Goal 4) 12.Expand NGRREC’s Research Capabilities (Goal 4) 13.Extend Healthcare Education and Services (Goal 4) 14.Community On-Campus Engagement (Goal 4) 15.Employee and Student Public Service Activities (Goal 4) Implementation Plan and Next Steps A preliminary implementation plan, including project benefits and metrics, assignment of team leads, funding strategy, key tasks, and a high level timeline was developed. L&C is now turning a corner with the strategic plan and must effect a smooth and organized transition to implementation of projects and regular progress reporting under the oversight of the Executive Cabinet. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 8 MAIN REPORT Introduction and Background L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 9 Introduction and Acknowledgements L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017 Introduction Lewis & Clark Community College is an achievement driven institution, thoroughly dedicated to student success and the continuing quality-of-life and prosperity of the communities it serves. A high level of achievement is encouraged and facilitated by supportive leadership and employees who are routinely innovative and entrepreneurial. This document is a testimony to L&C’s commitment to transparent, candid, and open self-examination. As an institution, L&C has over the years shown remarkable agility and adaptability in response to new and emerging challenges and opportunities. We are confident that it will continue to do so as it strives for even higher levels of quality and performance over the five-years of this plan (FY 2013-2017) and into the future. This strategic plan defines L&C’s strategic priorities for the next five years. It is important to recognize that while this plan directs attention and resources to four areas of strategic focus, it is not meant to understate continuing operations involving mission critical functions, including infrastructure development and maintenance. This plan is a complementary extension of ongoing operations that puts special emphasis on strategically important issues. The plan addresses challenges and opportunities that reflect existing and emerging forces for change and L&C’s ongoing aspirations to continuous improvement and higher levels of performance and achievement. This plan was developed concurrently with the Self-Study for Reaccreditation project and is closely aligned with the criteria established by L&C’s accrediting agency, the Higher Learning Commission (HLC) of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools (NCACS). This close alignment of the two projects has had a synergy effect that greatly improved the quality of both projects, the strategic plan and the self-study. Acknowledgements This plan could not have been completed without the selfless contribution of many individuals, including board members (both L&C Trustees and the Foundation Board), administration, faculty, staff, and students. A special thanks goes to the twenty-member steering committee that endured four 4-hour workshops and much additional behind-the- scenes work to apply their broad expertise, discerning insights, and innovative thinking to the planning effort. We would also like to acknowledge the L&C Board of Trustees. Without their continuing encouragement and support this project would not have been possible.
  • Background: The planning process was guided by three fundamental principles to ensure close alignment with the organization’s mission, vision, and values; that participation is inclusive; and that recommendations are actionable. Planning Principles The planning process engaged at some level those stakeholders who can have a major impact on recommendations or will be impacted by these recommendations Mission Values Strategic Alignment Inclusiveness Actionable Recommendations Recommendations from this strategy are consistent and closely aligned with the organization’s mission, vision, and values Recommendations are “doable” in the sense that existing or available capabilities and resources are sufficient to execute these recommendations L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017 10
  • 11 Data Collection / Environmental Scan • Interviews • Surveys • Focus Groups • Document Review Reaffirm... • Mission • Purposes • Vision • Values Strengths Challenges Opportunities Change Drivers Mandates Steering Committee Workshops GOALS STRATEGIES METRICS PROJECTS Project Teams: Implement Cabinet: Oversee The Planning Process: The planning process was comprehensive and inclusive, bringing together many elements with singular continuity stretching from initial findings to tentative conclusions to recommended goals and strategies. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Background: The project timeline spanned nine months with eight major steps that along the way engaged board members, students, faculty, staff, and the public in general. SEP OCT NOV DEC JAN FEB MAR APR MAY 1. Project Initialization 2. Environmental Scan / SWOT 3. Mission, purposes , & vision 4. Gap Analysis 5. Strategies & Goals 6. Projects & Implementation 7. Final Report 8. Publish & Celebrate Transition to Updated Project Implementation Plan 12 Objectives 1. Define institutional priorities for the next five years 2. Do so in an open, honest, and transparent fashion 3. Incorporate measures to ensure that projects are effectively implemented and follow-on progress reports are conducted on a regular basis Timeline L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 13 President & Steering Committee (SC) Tom Wunderle Dr. George Banziger Planning Participants Background: Planning was facilitated by Tom Wunderle (Institutional Planning and Effectiveness) and Dr. George Banziger (consultant) and greatly assisted by a steering committee consisting of the President and 19 representatives from across the College. Facilitators 1. Dr. Dale Chapman, President 2. Lori Artis, VP Media & Foundation Relations 3. Gary Ayres, VP Administration 4. Cathy Carruthers, Professor / Coordinator Office Technology 5. Dr. Linda Chapman, VP Academic Affairs 6. Nancy Kaiser, Associate VP Accounting 7. Kent Scheffel, VP Enrollment Services 8. Mary Schulte, Associate VP Finance & Treasurer 9. George Terry, VP Student Life 10. Mark Tuck, Chief Information Officer 11. Dr. Sue Czerwinski, Dean Math, Science & Technology 12. Jill Lane, Dean Liberal Arts & Business 13. Donna Meyer, Dean Health Sciences 14. Tom Monroe, Dean Workforce, Corporate & Community Learning 15. Dennis Krieb, Director Institutional Research / Academic Information Services 16. Val Harris, Director Adult Education 17. Nick Moehn, Director Academic Operations & Planning 18. Jeff Watson, Associate VP Institutional Computing / Networking & Systems 19. Bill Kruidenier, Associate Director NGRREC 20. Karl Zilm, Professor Mathematics L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Background: During the planning process, the project team conducted a thorough assessment of the “current state.” Data collection engaged a large number of stakeholders through multiple methods and channels. 14 Web Posting of the Strategy for Public View / CommentReview / Analysis of Documentation 47 Interviews L&C Board L&C Foundation Board Executive Cabinet Associate VP’s Deans Students 638 Surveys Faculty (92) Staff (139) Students (407) 4 (4-hour) Steering Committee Workshops December 7 January 18 March 13 April 17 6 Focus Groups Students (1) Faculty (3) Staff (2) Article in the student newspaper (The Bridge) Presentations SGA In-Service Board of Trustees Foundation Board Managers L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 15 MAIN REPORT Mission, Purposes, Vision, Values L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Mission: At the December 7 steering committee (SC) workshop, all agreed that the current Mission statement was still relevant, accurate, and sufficiently inspirational, and therefore should not be changed. It was also agreed that some form of “commentary” on the mission and values would help others better understand the meaning and implications of those expressions of institutional purpose and values. 16 Empower people by raising aspirations and fostering achievement through dynamic, compassionate, and responsible learning experiences. L&C Mission Note: See Appendix A for Mission and Vision Commentary L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Purposes: It was, however, recommended that the Purposes be revised to replace “bulleted statements” with complete sentences, to include more direct references to adult and developmental education, and otherwise to improve the readability of the document. 17 1. Transfer programs to 4-year colleges and universities 2. Preparation for entry into the workforce and career advancement or change through certificate and associate degree programs 3. Preparation for entry level and general education college courses 4. Provide programs / experiences that foster individual development and build communications, technology and other lifelong learning skills 5. Provide a learning environment that is supported by teaching excellence, high quality student services, and well-equipped and maintained facilities 6. Support education, economic development, and research through partnerships and community service programs 7. Promote the advancement and well-being of district citizens through cultural, civic, and professional activities Purposes: Current Version Purposes: Proposed Revised Version* 1. Prepare students for transfer to four-year colleges and universities 2. Prepare students for entry into the workforce, career advancement or career change through technical certificate and associate degree programs 3. Provide adult basic education, general education development (GED), developmental, and other instruction that prepares students for college level course work 4. Provide programs and experiences that foster individual development through job skills and lifelong learning skills to meet the demands of a global, technology-driven, and knowledge-based economy 5. Provide a learning environment that is supported by teaching excellence, high quality student services, and well-equipped and maintained instructional facilities 6. Support education and research activities and the economic development of the district and the State of Illinois through partnerships and community service programs 7. Contribute to the advancement and well-being of the citizens of the district through cultural, civic, and professional activities *This revision was formally approved by the Board of Trustees at the February 14, 2012 board meeting. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Vision: It was also agreed on December 7 to make minor changes to the Vision,* including the replacement of the phrase “we aspire” to a more bold and confidant “we are” in the introduction to the vision. 18 We are the preeminent provider of relevant, high quality learning experiences to the communities we serve. The College combines the best of the traditional and the modern to provide an environment that is accessible and highly conducive to learning, social interaction, personal enrichment, physical development, and job skills enhancement. Programs and support services are carefully designed to serve the current and evolving needs of our students. Faculty and staff exemplify the highest standards of service and performance and take pride in the achievement of our students and the College as a whole. Our actions reflect Lewis and Clark’s core values of service, respect, responsibility, compassion and integrity. We hold ourselves accountable for our performance as educators and as stewards of the resources entrusted to us. The true measure of our performance is the personal and academic success of our students, the overall well-being and cultural enrichment of the communities we serve, and the economic vitality of the region. L&C Vision *This revision was formally approved by the Board of Trustees at the February 14, 2012 board meeting. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Core Values: Based on survey data and feedback from focus groups, the steering committee recommended a revision of the Core Values to remove “fairness” and “truth,” and add “service” and “integrity.” 19 Comparative Survey RankingsPrevious Values Proposed Revised Values* • Service • Respect • Responsibility • Compassion • Integrity • Responsibility • Truth • Compassion • Fairness • Respect *This revision was formally approved by the Board of Trustees at the February 14, 2012 board meeting. Note: See Appendix A for Mission and Vision Commentary L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 20 MAIN REPORT Environmental Scan L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 21 Environmental Scan – Change Drivers and Mandates: The planning team identified 21 change drivers* and mandates* that demand our attention because of their potential impact on students, college operations, and institutional priorities in general. 1. The Economy 2. SURS Changes and Other Human Resources Actions 3. Jobs and Unemployment 4. Returning Military 5. Globalization 6. Changing Demographics 7. Performance-Based Funding 8. Institutional and Program Level Accreditation Standards 9. Growing Number of Unfunded Mandates** 10. Rapid Changes in Technology 11. Knowledge and Information Explosion 12. Increasing Demand for Accountability 13. Geo-Political Events and the Threat of Terrorism 14. Scientific Breakthroughs 15. Climate Change 16. The Green Economy 17. Increasing Poverty and the Growing Economic Divide 18. Increasing Competition from other Institutions 19. Healthcare Reform 20. Regional Drug Abuse Epidemic 21. Growing Scarcity of Natural Resources *Change Driver: An existing or emerging force or phenomenon with potential social, economic, political, scientific, intellectual, or other impact that has implications for our graduates and educational institutions. **Mandate: An official order or commission to so something or limiting authority in some way. Change Drivers and Mandates L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 22 Environmental Scan – Strengths: The planning team identified 21 major strengths that L&C could leverage as it strives to achieve its goals and improve quality and performance. 1. Campuses 2. Board of Trustees 3. Community College Foundation 4. Value and Affordability 5. Communications 6. Enrollment 7. Grants 8. Cultural Programming / Campus Venues 9. Caring and Service Oriented Faculty and Staff 10. A Culture of Excellence and Leadership 11. Data-Informed Decision Making 12. Infrastructure: Technology 13. Leadership 14. Infrastructure: Facilities 15. High School Partnership (Dual Credit Program) 16. Corporate Partnerships and Workforce Training 17. Reputation / Image 18. Contribution to Local Economy 19. Environmental Sustainability Leadership 20. Learning and Program Assessment 21. Public Engagement L&C Strengths L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 23 Environmental Scan – Challenges: Just as some of the change drivers represent challenges that demand our attention, an assessment of the “current state” at L&C revealed challenges that can be seen more as opportunities to improve the quality and effectiveness of institutional practices. 1. Building / Facility Livability and Maintenance 2. Professional Development 3. Staffing / Workload Impact 4. Internal Communications 5. Decision-Making 6. Management Practices 7. Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) 8. Institutional Research 9. Documentation 10. Student Services Challenges L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 24 MAIN REPORT Goals and Strategies L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Goals and Strategies: Based on findings from the environmental scan, including change drivers and the College’s highest aspirations as expressed in the mission, purposes, and vision, the Steering Committee identified 4 strategic goals and 32 supporting strategies eventually embedded in 15 projects that define L&C’s priorities for the next 5-10 years. 4. Public Engagement and Service Leadership: Increase the level of public engagement to drive quality of life, civic, and other improvements 3. Career and Job Readiness: Improve the curriculum and support services to better equip students to obtain jobs and advance their careers 2. Institutional Quality and Effectiveness: Improve the quality and effectiveness of everything we do Strategic Goals 1. Student Academic Success: Improve student success as measured by key success indicators 25L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 26 MAIN REPORT Strategic Projects L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 27 Strategic Projects: The planning team identified 15 strategic projects to support the goals and strategies defined in the previous step. Strategic Projects (supported Goals) 1. Student Success Initiative (Goals 1 and 3) 2. Student Financial Assistance (Goals 1 and 3) 3. Continuous Quality Improvement (Goals 1-4) 4. Institutional Quality and Effectiveness (Goals 1-4) 5. Knowledge and Information Management (Goals 1-4) 6. Student Career and Job Readiness (Goal 3) 7. Strengthen Management Practices (Goal 2) 8. Advance Institutional Research (Goal 2) 9. Internal Communications (Goal 2) 10. Staffing and Workload Management (Goal 2) 11. Modeling Sustainable Practices (Goal 4) 12. Expand NGRREC’s Research Capabilities (Goal 4) 13. Extend Healthcare Education and Services (Goal 4) 14. Community On-Campus Engagement (Goal 4) 15. Employee and Student Public Service Activities (Goal 4) L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 28 Strategic Projects: Steering Committee members scored each project based on 4 criteria: strategic value, stakeholder value, cost, and feasibility. Composite scores suggest that projects on the higher end of the scale are worthy of more immediate focus given the challenges and opportunities L&C and its stakeholders now face. High to Low Rankings on all Criteria Note: Projects that shared the same scores were assigned the same ranking level. Hence, none of the rankings maxed out at 15, the total number of projects. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 29 MAIN REPORT Implementation Plan L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 30 Implementation Plan: Pending further planning and research by the project teams, a long term implementation plan was created for each project. Budgets have yet to be determined, but for many projects, the largest cost will be associated with personnel time. Summary Implementation Plan L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 31 MAIN REPORT Next Steps L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 32 Next Steps: L&C is now turning a corner with the strategic plan and must effect a smooth and organized transition to implementation of projects and regular progress reporting under the oversight of the Executive Cabinet. • Transition to executive cabinet as project oversight committee • Project teams develop more detailed project plans • Project plans are presented to executive cabinet • Plans are approved / modified and budgets approved, etc. • Quarterly progress report presentations to the executive cabinet* L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 33 Next Steps: It was suggested that individual Executive Cabinet members chair progress report sessions on a rotating basis. Progress reports will be presented from written reports using a common template. COMMON TEMPLATE Strategic Projects: Progress Report Date of Progress Report: ________________ Project: _____________________________ Executive Owner: _____________________ Report I. *Summary statement regarding “on time, on task, on budget” status of the project+ II. [Discussion of targeted milestones and objectives and where the project is in regard to these] III. [Discussion of any challenges the team is facing, any adjustments / changes recommended to the project plan and justification for these] IV. [Discussion of any other important observations, lessons learned, recommended interim actions based on project findings / outcomes, etc.] V. [Prognosis for completion of the project per the established timeline, resource requirements, potential “institutionalization” of the project, etc.+ VI. [Open to questions from the Executive Cabinet] L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 34 APPENDIX A: Mission and Values Commentary L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • Mission Commentary 35 Empower people by raising aspirations and fostering achievement through dynamic, compassionate, and responsible learning experiences. L&C Mission Mission Commentary • Empower people: To empower people means to equip them with the knowledge, skills and other resources they need to succeed. This interpretation assumes that the knowledge and skills imparted to the student are of practical value in the sense that they are relevant and consistent with the needs of business, government, society in general, and that they otherwise contribute to personal development and life enrichment. It makes no sense to equip people with knowledge and skills that have no “payback” in this sense. In another sense, L&C can empower people through financial aid and other assistance that makes it possible for them to attend school, and through support services such as the Student Success Center, disability services, veterans services, and the emergency fund. Empowerment also means to support the development of self-advocacy skills as students interact with faculty and staff, internship / clinical partners, and other students. • Raising aspirations: Every student and employee is a living and breathing opportunity to raise aspirations. Some are unaware of available pathways and resources that can help them grow and advance their lives and careers. Others may not realize their own potential or may lack the confidence, ambition, or drive needed to excel. L&C faculty and staff see this as an opportunity to raise student aspirations in meaningful ways. This can be done through encouragement, mentoring, and just getting to know their students and employees. From an institutional perspective, the College collectively and continually strives to raise the aspirations of the surrounding communities and all of their citizens. Many College initiatives and services, including sustainability, workforce training, healthcare services, adult education, and the dual credit program reach out into the community to encourage and inspire higher levels of achievement and quality of life. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 36 • Fostering achievement: By encouraging and promoting the development of good study skills, personal discipline, the ability to leverage technology and other tools, and a love of learning, L&C is positioning students for achievement and success. This goes hand in hand with raising aspirations and contributes to empowerment. • Dynamic learning experiences: Students learn better when the learning environment is charged with energy, stimulating, interesting, thought provoking, and even fun or inspiring. There is also a strong connotation of active engagement with the students individually and collectively in a two-way, dynamic exchange. Faculty are encouraged to inject these qualities into the classroom when appropriate and make considered use of lab equipment, technology, and other learning tools. • Compassionate learning experiences: True compassion recognizes the challenges, struggles, and disadvantages that others face, and seeks to help alleviate the pain and discouragement these struggles cause. The compassionate educator or service provider is better able to “connect” and empathize with struggling students than those who are not compassionate by nature. This compassion often finds expression in a caring and respectful attitude towards these students, a personal interest in their lives, the devotion of time and attention to their situations, and a sincere desire to help them where this is practical and possible. Compassion sometimes compels us to think creatively about solutions to student or employee dilemmas that may require new approaches. Compassion in these forms of expression fosters achievement, and for many students, may be the life changing experience that sets them on the path to success. L&C’s College for Life and Emergency Fund programs are clear institutional expressions of compassion. • Responsible learning experiences: In this sense, responsibility applies to both the instructor and the learner. It’s the instructor’s responsibility to set and maintain performance and behavioral standards that will accomplish program and course objectives and position the student for success in this particular course and beyond. It’s also the instructor’s responsibility to provide dynamic learning experiences as described above. It’s the learner’s responsibility to apply personal discipline in a concerted effort to study hard, attend all classes, and complete all assignments on time. For the student, being responsible implies taking responsibility for his / her own actions. Mission Commentary: Continued. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 37 Core Values Commentary Cores Values Commentary • Service: First and foremost, L&C was established to serve the educational needs of the district. Service in this context includes instructional and support services, including advising, financial aid, and specific services that may be targeted to disadvantaged and other groups (disability services, minority affairs, veterans affairs, etc.). At the highest level though, this core value is about “service orientation,” an attitude or predisposition for helping other people, providing assistance or some form of benefit to someone, whether on or off campus. While the emphasis is on the college and its employees as service providers, and students and the community as service recipients, this concept can also apply to students in their dealings with peers and others who may rely on some form of service. In a CQI (Continuous Quality Improvement) culture, the level and quality of service provided by employees, programs, and departments is a key metric for quality and performance assessment. In this context, the concept of “customer” is especially important, so that all L&C employees have both internal and external “customers” to whom they provide a service of one kind or another. At the institutional level, the importance of service orientation and service quality should be reinforced through leadership example and management systems, including performance appraisal, professional development, recognition, and rewards. There are many examples of service to the community performed by students, faculty, and staff, including health services; environmental clean up crews; curriculum based service projects; consulting assistance to local businesses and governments; musical programs; and grant supported projects. Cores Values Service, Respect, Responsibility, Compassion, Integrity L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 38 Core Values Commentary: Continued. • Respect: It is no surprise that L&C students ranked respect as the value that they most associate with L&C as an institution. Everyone wants to be treated with respect, and students, however young and inexperienced, rightfully demand the same. Most dictionary definitions of respect include references to the qualities of deference, courtesy, dignity, and esteem in one’s interactions with others. This concept is broadly applicable to every member of every constituency involved with L&C. At L&C, respect can be expressed in many ways: e.g., by acknowledging and smiling as you pass a student on the walkway, greeting a student in a friendly and respectful way as they approach a service center, treating students as adults in the classroom, returning a colleague’s phone call in a reasonable amount of time, showing up at a meeting on time, and generally meeting commitments we’ve made to others. As with all other core values, the example of a respectful attitude and style by the leadership is a crucial reinforcement of this value. This and other core values should be routinely reinforced through employee mentoring and professional development, and recognized and rewarded when observed. At the same time employees and students should be held accountable for disrespectful actions or expressions when these are observed, whether inside or outside the classroom. Several years ago, a question related to being treated with respect by the instructor was appropriately added to the end-of-course student survey. This question should be a component of all departmental assessments and included in employee performance plans and professional development plans. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 39 Core Values Commentary: Continued. • Responsibility: The idea of “responsible learning experiences” is called out in the L&C mission statement. In this sense, responsibility applies to both the instructor and the learner. It’s the instructor’s responsibility to set and maintain performance and behavioral standards that will accomplish program and course objectives and position the student for success in this particular course and beyond. It’s also the instructor’s responsibility to provide dynamic learning experiences as described above. It’s the learner’s responsibility to apply personal discipline in a concerted effort to study hard, attend all classes, and complete all assignments on time. For the student, being responsible implies taking responsibility for his / her own actions. In a larger sense though, responsibility extends itself to all of our actions as L&C employees and service providers. The idea of taking and accepting responsibility for our own actions is one expression of character quality and maturity level that is fundamental to a strong organization. At L&C, responsibility can be expressed in a number of ways: e.g., taking personal responsibility for actions that may have been taken by your organization but not you individually, not “passing the buck” on a problem or challenge because it’s not in your “job description,” working to solve the underlying causes of a student problem rather than just treating the symptom, showing up on time and putting in a full day’s work, holding students and employees accountable for performance however uncomfortable that may make you. • Compassion: The idea of “compassionate learning experiences” is also addressed in the mission. True compassion recognizes the challenges, struggles, and disadvantages that others face, and seeks to help alleviate the pain and discouragement these struggles cause. The compassionate educator or service provider is better able to “connect” and empathize with struggling students than those who are not compassionate by nature. This compassion often finds expression in a caring and respectful attitude towards these students, a personal interest in their lives, the devotion of time and attention to their situations, and a sincere desire to help them where this is practical and possible. Compassion sometimes compels us to think creatively about solutions to student or employee dilemmas that may require new approaches. Compassion in these forms of expression fosters achievement, and for many students, may be the life changing experience that sets them on the path to success. L&C’s College for Life and Emergency Fund programs are clear institutional expressions of compassion. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017
  • 40 Core Values Commentary: Continued. • Integrity: Integrity is usually associated with moral uprightness, honesty, and truthfulness. Integrity of action nurtures trust and confidence in those who encounter that quality. In the original sense of the Latin word, integer (whole, complete), integrity conveys a sense of “inner wholeness” that derives from qualities such as honesty and consistency of character. All college accrediting bodies associate ethical and responsible conduct with integrity, and set high standards for that principle. The institution is expected to follow fair and ethical policies and procedures at every level; to present itself clearly and completely to students and the public with regard to programs, requirements, cost, and other factors; to avoid conflict of interest; and to support and reinforce freedom of expression and the pursuit of truth in teaching and learning. There is a clear notion of “fairness” in this interpretation that is particularly important to students and employees who want and expect to be treated with fairness in the assignment of grades, workload, class assignments, and other matters. At the individual level, integrity plays into every one of our dealings with students, employees, vendors, contractors, state agencies, trustees, and others. We have a moral obligation to be honest and truthful, even if the truth may be hard to bear in some cases. If a student or employee’s performance is heading in the wrong direction, the instructor or manager has an obligation to address that with the individual, however uncomfortable that may make one. In most enterprises, integrity of action is considered a “condition of employment,” meaning a failure of integrity could result in dismissal or some other form of sanction. Once again, integrity, like the other core values, is reinforced by the words and actions of the leadership, clear policies and procedures, high standards and expectations in personal performance plans, and accountability for violations. L&C Five-Year Strategic Plan: FY 2013-2017