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WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
The Five-Paragraph Essay <ul><li>Introduction: </li></ul><ul><li>Introductory Paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>The introductory...
Body: <ul><li>Body — First paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The first paragraph of the body should contain the strongest argum...
<ul><li>Body — Second paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The second paragraph of the body should contain the second strongest ar...
<ul><li>Body — Third paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The third paragraph of the body should contain the weakest argument, wea...
Conclusion: <ul><li>Concluding paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>This paragraph should include the following:  </li></ul><ul><l...
WRITING ABOUT FICTION <ul><li>Notice the structure -> plot, chronological order, subplots (minor complications in the main...
<ul><li>Study the characters -> pay attention to the dialogues, what one character says or thinks about the other, how the...
Look for special literary techniques <ul><li>Irony: involves na upsetting of expectations -> the opposite happens from wha...
Examine the title <ul><li>The title may in some way point toward or be related to the meaning: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Man...
Theme <ul><li>Many definitions: central idea or thesis; the central thought; underlying meaning, the dominating idea; cent...
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Writing About Fiction

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Writing about fiction

(Creator: Delzi Laranjeira)

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Transcript of "Writing About Fiction"

  1. 1. WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE
  2. 2. The Five-Paragraph Essay <ul><li>Introduction: </li></ul><ul><li>Introductory Paragraph </li></ul><ul><li>The introductory paragraph includes the thesis statement, a kind of mini-outline for the paper: it tells the reader what the essay is about. The last sentence of this paragraph must also contain a transitional &quot;hook&quot; which moves the reader to the first paragraph of the body of the paper. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Body: <ul><li>Body — First paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The first paragraph of the body should contain the strongest argument, most significant example, cleverest illustration, or an obvious beginning point. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the &quot;reverse hook&quot; which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the introductory paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional hook to tie into the second paragraph of the body. </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Body — Second paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The second paragraph of the body should contain the second strongest argument, second most significant example, second cleverest illustration, or an obvious follow up the first paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the first paragraph of the body. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional hook to tie into the third paragraph of the body. </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Body — Third paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>The third paragraph of the body should contain the weakest argument, weakest example, weakest illustration, or an obvious follow up to the second paragraph in the body. The first sentence of this paragraph should include the reverse hook which ties in with the transitional hook at the end of the second paragraph. The topic for this paragraph should be in the first or second sentence. This topic should relate to the thesis statement in the introductory paragraph. The last sentence in this paragraph should include a transitional concluding hook that signals the reader that this is the final major point being made in this paper. This hook also leads into the last, or concluding, paragraph. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Conclusion: <ul><li>Concluding paragraph: </li></ul><ul><li>This paragraph should include the following: </li></ul><ul><li>an allusion to the pattern used in the introductory paragraph, </li></ul><ul><li>a restatement of the thesis statement, using some of the original language or language that &quot;echoes&quot; the original language. (The restatement, however, must not be a duplicate thesis statement.) </li></ul><ul><li>a summary of the three main points from the body of the paper. </li></ul><ul><li>a final statement that gives the reader signals that the discussion has come to an end. (This final statement may be a &quot;call to action&quot; in an persuasive paper.) </li></ul>
  7. 7. WRITING ABOUT FICTION <ul><li>Notice the structure -> plot, chronological order, subplots (minor complications in the main action) </li></ul><ul><li>Consider point of view and setting-> sometimes they can be crucial to the effectiveness and understanding of the story </li></ul>
  8. 8. <ul><li>Study the characters -> pay attention to the dialogues, what one character says or thinks about the other, how they are described, search the charater’s motivation for behaving in a certain way or another, identify the foils ( a minor character who broads our understanding of a major character by providing a contrast). </li></ul>
  9. 9. Look for special literary techniques <ul><li>Irony: involves na upsetting of expectations -> the opposite happens from what would be usual. </li></ul><ul><li>Foreshadowing: hints of future happenings </li></ul><ul><li>Images: words and phrases that put a picture in your mind. (symbols, motifs) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Examine the title <ul><li>The title may in some way point toward or be related to the meaning: </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Man Who Was Almost a Man” (Richard Wright): evokes the theme (the difficulty that African Americans face in achieving manhood in the U. S.) </li></ul><ul><li>“ Chrysanthemums” (D. H. Lawrence): controlling symbol </li></ul><ul><li>“ Good Country People” (F. O’ Connor): a double meaning, pointing to the irony embedded in our judgements. </li></ul><ul><li>Heart of Darkness (J. Conrad): directs the readers straight to its subject (hidden evil at the core of human nature) </li></ul>
  11. 11. Theme <ul><li>Many definitions: central idea or thesis; the central thought; underlying meaning, the dominating idea; central truth, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Usually stated in general terms. </li></ul><ul><li># from subject: topic or material the story examines. </li></ul><ul><li>Theme: the direct or implied statement about the subject </li></ul>
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