Printmaking and political art

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how art and politics are intertwined particularly in printmaking . contemporary imagery includes street art

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  • Printmaking and political art

    1. 1. Paper Politics
    2. 2. Paper PoliticsPolitical Art and Printmaking
    3. 3. • political prints have always been intended to engage the viewer, change opinion and inspire action• in US China and Mexico printmakers work collectively to generate powerful images that reflected the social conditions of the times• printmaking has an advantage that painting an sculpture does not : it doesn’t cost a lot , its expressive and is an ideal way to voice oppositon• artists such as Rembrandt and Goya made prints but were famous because of their paintings . There are other artists who around the 1940’s created political art that represented the social condition of their time. This continues today with printmaking that also includes extensions such as street art using stencils and wheatpaste
    4. 4. • political prints have always been intended to engage the viewer, change opinion and inspire action• in US China and Mexico printmakers work collectively to generate powerful images that reflected the social conditions of the times• printmaking has an advantage that painting an sculpture does not : it doesn’t cost a lot , its expressive and is an ideal way to voice oppositon• artists such as Rembrandt and Goya made prints but were famous because of their paintings . There are other artists who around the 1940’s created political art that represented the social condition of their time. This continues today with printmaking that also includes extensions such as street art using stencils and wheatpaste
    5. 5. • political prints have always been intended to engage the viewer, change opinion and inspire action• in US China and Mexico printmakers work collectively to generate powerful images that reflected the social conditions of the times• printmaking has an advantage that painting an sculpture does not : it doesn’t cost a lot , its expressive and is an ideal way to voice oppositon• artists such as Rembrandt and Goya made prints but were famous because of their paintings . There are other artists who around the 1940’s created political art that represented the social condition of their time. This continues today with printmaking that also includes extensions such as street art using stencils and wheatpaste
    6. 6. • political prints have always been intended to engage the viewer, change opinion and inspire action• in US China and Mexico printmakers work collectively to generate powerful images that reflected the social conditions of the times• printmaking has an advantage that painting an sculpture does not : it doesn’t cost a lot , its expressive and is an ideal way to voice oppositon• artists such as Rembrandt and Goya made prints but were famous because of their paintings . There are other artists who around the 1940’s created political art that represented the social condition of their time. This continues today with printmaking that also includes extensions such as street art using stencils and wheatpaste
    7. 7. Francisco Goya
    8. 8. Francisco Goya
    9. 9. Francisco Goya• this is what you were born for
    10. 10. Francisco Goya• this is what you were born for• 1810 -20
    11. 11. Francisco Goya• this is what you were born for• 1810 -20• Disasters of War series
    12. 12. Francisco Goya• this is what you were born for• 1810 -20• Disasters of War series• aquatint 8“ x 6”
    13. 13. Francisco Goya• this is what you were born for• 1810 -20• Disasters of War series• aquatint 8“ x 6”• his first act was to depict war without glory or purpose
    14. 14. Francisco Goya
    15. 15. Francisco Goya
    16. 16. Francisco Goya • Executions of the 3rd of May 1808 painted in 1814
    17. 17. Francisco Goya • Executions of the 3rd of May 1808 painted in 1814 • Goya painted a group of Napoleon’s army shooting the men of Madrid who stood against them as the army invaded.
    18. 18. Francisco Goya • Executions of the 3rd of May 1808 painted in 1814 • Goya painted a group of Napoleon’s army shooting the men of Madrid who stood against them as the army invaded. • white shirted man/ innocence of all victims
    19. 19. Francisco Goya : I Saw It
    20. 20. Francisco Goya : I Saw It
    21. 21. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters
    22. 22. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters
    23. 23. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters • etching and aquatint
    24. 24. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters • etching and aquatint • Imagination abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters: united with her, she is the mother of the arts and the source of her wonders.
    25. 25. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters • etching and aquatint • Imagination abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters: united with her, she is the mother of the arts and the source of her wonders.
    26. 26. The Dream of Reason Brings forth Monsters • etching and aquatint • Imagination abandoned by reason produces impossible monsters: united with her, she is the mother of the arts and the source of her wonders. • It would appear the etching highlights the value of rational thought and reflection. Without this process there is no correction of thought or elimination of bad elements in our practices.
    27. 27. • Rue Transnonain was created in response to the massacre of 19 people - including women and children - by the French National Guard in response to the strike of silk weavers in Lyon, on April 14, 1834.• response?
    28. 28. Honore Daumier: Rue Transnonain 15th April • Rue Transnonain was created in response to the massacre of 19 people - including women and children - by the French National Guard in response to the strike of silk weavers in Lyon, on April 14, 1834. • response?
    29. 29. Daumier: Gargantua lithograph 1831
    30. 30. Daumier: Gargantua lithograph 1831• this image landed Daumier in jail• he depicts the King Louise Philippe devouring the food and money of the poor• he sits on a camode and expels favours for the rich and politicians
    31. 31. Daumier: Gargantua lithograph 1831• this image landed Daumier in jail• he depicts the King Louise Philippe devouring the food and money of the poor• he sits on a camode and expels favours for the rich and politicians
    32. 32. Manet: Execution of Maximilian of 1867
    33. 33. Manet: Execution of Maximilian of 1867
    34. 34. Manet: Execution of Maximilian of 1867 • Abandoned by the French government that crowned him and sent him to Mexico, the Emperor Maximilian was executed by a firing squad of Benito Juárezs army at Querétaro, north of Mexico City, on June 19, 1867. News of the execution reached Paris on July 1, just as Napoleon III was inaugurating that years Universal Exposition. Édouard Manet set to work almost immediately, and by early 1869 he had completed a series of four paintings and one lithograph of the subject.
    35. 35. Manet: Execution of Maximilian of 1867 • Abandoned by the French government that crowned him and sent him to Mexico, the Emperor Maximilian was executed by a firing squad of Benito Juárezs army at Querétaro, north of Mexico City, on June 19, 1867. News of the execution reached Paris on July 1, just as Napoleon III was inaugurating that years Universal Exposition. Édouard Manet set to work almost immediately, and by early 1869 he had completed a series of four paintings and one lithograph of the subject. • link to Daumier’s work
    36. 36. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving
    37. 37. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving
    38. 38. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving
    39. 39. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving • Our System of Feathering Nests Breeds Tweeds all over the Land. From the cover of Harpers Weekly dated March 27, 1886. This wood engraving shows a vulture with a big dollar sign on his chest sitting high above the city in his nest, which is lined with money bags and bones.
    40. 40. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving • Our System of Feathering Nests Breeds Tweeds all over the Land. From the cover of Harpers Weekly dated March 27, 1886. This wood engraving shows a vulture with a big dollar sign on his chest sitting high above the city in his nest, which is lined with money bags and bones. • corrupt officials who stole millions of dollars from the city of New York.
    41. 41. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving • Our System of Feathering Nests Breeds Tweeds all over the Land. From the cover of Harpers Weekly dated March 27, 1886. This wood engraving shows a vulture with a big dollar sign on his chest sitting high above the city in his nest, which is lined with money bags and bones. • corrupt officials who stole millions of dollars from the city of New York. • Nast’s campaign led to Tweed’s arrest and imprisonment
    42. 42. Thomas Nast : A Group of Vultures Waitingwood engraving • Our System of Feathering Nests Breeds Tweeds all over the Land. From the cover of Harpers Weekly dated March 27, 1886. This wood engraving shows a vulture with a big dollar sign on his chest sitting high above the city in his nest, which is lined with money bags and bones. • corrupt officials who stole millions of dollars from the city of New York. • Nast’s campaign led to Tweed’s arrest and imprisonment
    43. 43. German Expressionism
    44. 44. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    45. 45. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    46. 46. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    47. 47. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    48. 48. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    49. 49. German Expressionism• prints became the the medium of political communication during the upheavel of World War I and the revolutions and the class struggles that followed• Kathe Kollwitz, Otto Dix and George Grosz used their prints to attack injustice, poverty and war
    50. 50. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    51. 51. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    52. 52. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    53. 53. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    54. 54. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    55. 55. • The Mothers, woodcut• Mother and Dead Child; etching 1903• Prisoners, from the Peasants War; etching
    56. 56. Otto Dix
    57. 57. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI
    58. 58. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24
    59. 59. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24• highlights the stark reality of trench warfare
    60. 60. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24• highlights the stark reality of trench warfare• Wounded , etching
    61. 61. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24• highlights the stark reality of trench warfare• Wounded , etching• Mealtime in the trenches, etching
    62. 62. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24• highlights the stark reality of trench warfare• Wounded , etching• Mealtime in the trenches, etching
    63. 63. Otto Dix• showed the carnage that he had experienced first hand in WWI• he created a group of etchings and aquatints created from 1920-24• highlights the stark reality of trench warfare• Wounded , etching• Mealtime in the trenches, etching
    64. 64. George Grosz
    65. 65. George Grosz • Grosz satarized the corrupt officers of the German armies • Heartfield Blut and Eisen ( Blood and Iron) became the sign of resistance in Germany (photomontage • Grosz’s Fit for Service
    66. 66. George Grosz • Grosz satarized the corrupt officers of the German armies • Heartfield Blut and Eisen ( Blood and Iron) became the sign of resistance in Germany (photomontage • Grosz’s Fit for Service
    67. 67. George Grosz • Grosz satarized the corrupt officers of the German armies • Heartfield Blut and Eisen ( Blood and Iron) became the sign of resistance in Germany (photomontage • Grosz’s Fit for Service
    68. 68. Are there consequences? Does it make adifference?• In the 1930’s Kollwitz, Dix Grosz and Heartfield were all threatened by the Nazi’s and prevented from working openly• The Nazi’s confiscated the work of the artists and had them dismissed from their teaching positions• Images from Dix, Grosz and Heartfeld were shown in the Degenerate Art Exhibition of 1937 . There is another side to this story though...
    69. 69. The First Blockbuster exhibition
    70. 70. The First Blockbuster exhibition
    71. 71. The First Blockbuster exhibition
    72. 72. The First Blockbuster exhibition• In 1937, Nazi officials purged German museums of works the Party considered to be degenerate. From the thousands of works removed, 650 were chosen for a special exhibit of Entartete Kunst. The exhibit opened in Munich and then traveled to eleven other cities in Germany and Austria. In each installation, the works were poorly hung and surrounded by graffiti and hand written labels mocking the artists and their creations. Over three million visitors attended making it the first "blockbuster" exhibition.
    73. 73. The First Blockbuster exhibition• In 1937, Nazi officials purged German museums of works the Party considered to be degenerate. From the thousands of works removed, 650 were chosen for a special exhibit of Entartete Kunst. The exhibit opened in Munich and then traveled to eleven other Kollwitz believed that art should reflect social conditions in cities in Germany and Austria. In each ones time. The Nazis forbade her work to be displayed, installation, the works were poorly hung and and banished her work to the cellar of the Crown Prince surrounded by graffiti and hand written labels Palace, declaring "In the Third Reich mothers have no mocking the artists and their creations. Over need to defend their children. The State does that." three million visitors attended making it the first "blockbuster" exhibition.
    74. 74. • the majority of artists considered “degenerate” became revered for their work and were major artists of the 20th century including the most degenerate of them all ... Picasso• the degenerate art show was exhibited along side what was considered good artwork, most of these artists are not studied as significant artists
    75. 75. Picasso : Guernica• what is its message? read for us on pg15 bottom of the page Chelsea
    76. 76. Guernica
    77. 77. Guernica
    78. 78. Guernica
    79. 79. Guernica• based on the bombing of the ancient Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War
    80. 80. Guernica• based on the bombing of the ancient Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War• Condor Legion of the German Luftwaffe attacked and destroyed Guernica, a civilian target as a practice mission for their warplanes (soon to be used in WW2)
    81. 81. Guernica• based on the bombing of the ancient Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War• Condor Legion of the German Luftwaffe attacked and destroyed Guernica, a civilian target as a practice mission for their warplanes (soon to be used in WW2)• more than 1 million Parisians marched in protest
    82. 82. Guernica• based on the bombing of the ancient Basque town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War• Condor Legion of the German Luftwaffe attacked and destroyed Guernica, a civilian target as a practice mission for their warplanes (soon to be used in WW2)• more than 1 million Parisians marched in protest• Picasso painted this / graphic effect/ looked like a newspaper
    83. 83. LEAR and TGP
    84. 84. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)
    85. 85. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)• TGP Popular Graphic Arts Workshop (Taller de Grafica Popular) both groups worked to create high quality woodblocks. lino and lithos and illustrations of political events
    86. 86. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)• TGP Popular Graphic Arts Workshop (Taller de Grafica Popular) both groups worked to create high quality woodblocks. lino and lithos and illustrations of political events• During the 40’s the TGP focused on fascism, the Spanish Civil War and rise of Hitler and Mussolini
    87. 87. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)• TGP Popular Graphic Arts Workshop (Taller de Grafica Popular) both groups worked to create high quality woodblocks. lino and lithos and illustrations of political events• During the 40’s the TGP focused on fascism, the Spanish Civil War and rise of Hitler and Mussolini• In 1938 they produced a series of anit Nazi prints
    88. 88. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)• TGP Popular Graphic Arts Workshop (Taller de Grafica Popular) both groups worked to create high quality woodblocks. lino and lithos and illustrations of political events• During the 40’s the TGP focused on fascism, the Spanish Civil War and rise of Hitler and Mussolini• In 1938 they produced a series of anit Nazi prints• Leopoldo Mendez created Deportation to Death 1942
    89. 89. LEAR and TGP• LEAR: League of Revolutionary Artists and Writers ( Liga Artistas y Escritores Revolucionarios)• TGP Popular Graphic Arts Workshop (Taller de Grafica Popular) both groups worked to create high quality woodblocks. lino and lithos and illustrations of political events• During the 40’s the TGP focused on fascism, the Spanish Civil War and rise of Hitler and Mussolini• In 1938 they produced a series of anit Nazi prints• Leopoldo Mendez created Deportation to Death 1942
    90. 90. • Cheng Tiegeng: Mao Zedong woodblock print• “These works are considered the start of the Chinese avant-garde movement.”• Li Qun, Portrait of Lu Zun• Li Hua ( style was strongly influenced by Kathe Kollwitz)
    91. 91. • Cheng Tiegeng: Mao Zedong woodblock print• “These works are considered the start of the Chinese avant-garde movement.”• Li Qun, Portrait of Lu Zun• Li Hua ( style was strongly influenced by Kathe Kollwitz)
    92. 92. The Cold War• after WWII and into the 60’ printmaking died out but not completely. Where there was political struggle there were graphic images/prints made. This would include the Cuban revolution, the Civil Rights movement and Vietnam War.• in the 1960’s there is a resurgence in print. a number of famous artists produce works in print• the first one we will look at is Ed Keinholz
    93. 93. Ed Keinholz
    94. 94. Ed Keinholz• Edward Kienholz wanted his art to function in the capacity of a social conscience. He wanted to create art that would make people reconsider the role of throw-away people in modern culture; to draw attention to the facets of society that are taboo. The people in Kienholzs works found few homes in the art of the 1950s and 1960s. Such ugly topics were not handled in the realm of high art. Kienholz felt that he had to call attention not only to their dilemmas, but to the social circumstances that allowed their exploitation.(2)
    95. 95. Ed Keinholz• Edward Kienholz wanted his art to function in the capacity of a social conscience. He wanted to create art that would make people reconsider the role of throw-away people in modern culture; to draw attention to the facets of society that are taboo. The people in Kienholzs works found few homes in the art of the 1950s and 1960s. Such ugly topics were not handled in the realm of high art. Kienholz felt that he had to call attention not only to their dilemmas, but to the social circumstances that allowed their exploitation.(2)
    96. 96. Ed Keinhoz: THE ILLEGAL OPERATION
    97. 97. Ed Keinhoz: THE ILLEGAL OPERATION
    98. 98. Ed Keinhoz: THE ILLEGAL OPERATION • Issue of abortion • Roe vs Wade • What is this installation about?
    99. 99. Andy Warhol: The Electric Chair 1971
    100. 100. Andy Warhol: The Electric Chair 1971
    101. 101. Andy Warhol: The Electric Chair 1971 • Warhol began using the image of the electric chair in 1963, the same year as the two final executions in New York State. Over the next decade, he repeatedly returned to the subject, reflecting the political controversy surrounding the death penalty in America in the 1960s. The chair, and its brutal reduction of life to nothingness, is given a typically deadpan presentation by Warhol. The image of an unoccupied electric chair in an empty execution chamber becomes a poignant metaphor for
    102. 102. Elizabeth Catlett: Sojourner Truth 1947
    103. 103. Elizabeth Catlett: Sojourner Truth 1947
    104. 104. Elizabeth Catlett: Sojourner Truth 1947
    105. 105. Elizabeth Catlett: Sojourner Truth 1947 • Catlett’s linocut along with Alison Saar’s 1999 Washtub Blues addresses the topic of racism in America
    106. 106. Leon Golub
    107. 107. Leon Golub
    108. 108. Leon Golub
    109. 109. Leon Golub
    110. 110. Leon Golub • Leon Golub Interrogation III 1981 acrylic on linen • Napalm I, acrylic on linen 1969 • Interrogation 1 1981 acrylic on
    111. 111. Leon Golub • Leon Golub Interro 1981 acrylic on lin • Napalm I, acrylic o 1969 • Interrogation 1 198
    112. 112. Sue Coe
    113. 113. Sue Coe
    114. 114. Sue Coe

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