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  • How is the web working for knowledge building (Not how the web is working for traditional publishers or how libraries are supposed to function) To see how the design of the net advance knowledge exchanges (global conversation) , not how to First there is too much to read, but we can’t access enough of it. Transition phase – two cultures Traditioanal experimental research – cost and material intenstive – school hierarchy maintained Who is in control? Patientslikeme.com Building local collections for global consumption Governance and financing of knowledge commons
  • Consequences of publishing in “internatioanlly” indexed journals
  • metrics of total publications and citations. Top 15 countries account for 82% of total publications Author with African institutional affiliation account for less than 1% of global output, and S. Africa has the highest output. The rest are “invisible” Consequence of trying to publish in “International” journal results in neglect of important local problems and solutions that are appropriate for local conditions.
  • 2.4. Bioline International is not regionally based nor supported by regional governments. It is a grass root initiative based on distributed support. 2.5. Mission of BI: to improve the visibility, usage and impact of journals from DCs; enhance knowledge through from South to North and from South to South; provide a sustainable platform for distributed dissemination; document the impact of OA (will return to this as this is the main crux of the presentation) 2.6. BI subject focus on health, environment and food security – issues that are highly relevant to regional development, but are often overlooked in m ainstream journals. 2.7. All publishing partners are non-profit, some are institutional based, some are independent. They are funded by a variety of models. Some maintain print subscription, some receive revenue from advertising, many receive subsidies or grants from aids or donor agencies. While others are supported by university funding or through membership due. 2.8 Bioline does not charge publishing partners any fee. 2.9 Added value by Bioline: Added visibility through rich metadata, direct linking from large number of research libraries from around the world, stable and reliable platform based at CRIA (may have been out of service once or twice for short period over the last 16 years), promotion and publicity in international arenas, usage statistics,
  • metrics of total publications and citations. Top 15 countries account for 82% of total publications Author with African institutional affiliation account for less than 1% of global output, and S. Africa has the highest output. The rest are “invisible” Consequence of trying to publish in “International” journal results in neglect of important local problems and solutions that are appropriate for local conditions.
  • “ that the specific trends identified in librarianship that accommodate the new public philosophy of casting public cultural institutions in economic terms represent a further diminution of the democratic public sphere.” “ vision of a library democratically connected to its community (be it a university, school, or town/city), engaging it in a rational dialogue about what it should be in light of democratic public purposes, and the need to provide alternatives and alternative spaces in a culture dominated by information capitalism and media image and spectacle (p. 180).” Buschman discusses how the library has moved from a model of contributing to the public good to one dictated by economics; he also analyzes how a focus on "customer-driven" librarianship is eroding the profession's historic role in supporting democracy Dismantling the Public Sphere is a call to action to protect information - an essential public good - from slipping out of the hands of ordinary citizens and a call to defend the traditional and vital role of librarianship in a democratic society “ New Public Philosophy” ideas generated by the advisors of Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagen can be dignified by such a word, holds that there is no such thing as the 'public good', that market forces should determine all allocation of resources, and that 'business knows best'. The ideology of rentlentless growth as measured by GDP Privitization and deregulation Subprime mortages 'new public philosophy' text: the rhetoric is that of the market—readers become 'customers' and, in the UK, the concept of delivering 'best value' for the spend on public libraries, dominates management thinking. The public sphere Habermas's concept of the public sphere is of the sphere of non-governmental opinion forming, created in the emerging bourgeois society of the 18th century. For Habermas, the public sphere was formed through communication, with the newspaper press acting as the agent of the public sphere. Libraries, then, especially public libraries, also emerge as agents of the public sphere—they constitute one of the agencies through which the communication of ideas of the public sphere may be made. Quality', as Bushman notes, is defined solely by 'customer satisfaction'. Value for money Return on Investment (cf. CRKN)
  • 3.6 An accounting framework influences how an organization defines success and values. 3.7 Traditional accounting focuses on maximizing shareholder value and on the financial bottom line. But the success of projects like Bioline can not be measured in economic terms (since we do not generate any revenue). We must measure instead the social impact across multiple dimensions: impacts on the authors, readers, publishers, and the broader scholarly communication environment, as well as the broader public and the policy environment
  • http://buelahman.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/855026_9d07_625x1000.jpg

Transcript

  • 1. Leslie Chan Director, Bioline International University of Toronto, Scarborough Canada
  • 2.  
  • 3.
    • Background
    • Current knowledge system
    • Evolving knowledge ecology
    • Reframe
    • From information “economy” to knowledge “society”
    • Librarians as custodians of the Public Sphere
    • Argument
    • Need for policy alignment and institutional redesign
    • Rethink the values and reward system
    A Challenge The 1% Solution to Open Access
  • 4. Background
    • Two trends as illustration
        • Rising Cost
        • “ World Science”
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7. Ithaka Faculty Survey 2009 “ Basic scholarly information use practices have shifted rapidly in recent years and, as a result, the academic library is increasingly being disintermediated from the discovery process, risking irrelevance in one of its core areas.“ http://www.ithaka.org/ithaka-s-r/research/faculty-surveys-2000-2009/faculty-survey-2009
  • 8. Library as Buyers? Ithaka Faculty Survey 2009
  • 9. “ we willingly serve as the corrections officers for corporate information prisons.” Barbara Fister, Trumping ownership with open access: a manifesto Library Journal, 4/1/2010 http://www.libraryjournal.com/article/CA6723666.html?nid=2671&rid=##reg_visitor_id##&source=title
  • 10.  
  • 11. http://thomsonreuters.com/
  • 12. The World of Scientific Output According to Thomson’s ISI Science Citation Index Data from 2002 http ://www.worldmapper.org/display.php?selected=205
  • 13. Retrieved April 26, 2010 from: http://maps.google.com/maps/ms?ie=UTF8&hl=en&msa=0&msid=117328677437228595850.00044ec490b69019e64a3&z=2 Active Bioline Journals graphed with Google Maps.
  • 14.  
  • 15.  
  • 16. The World of Scientific Output According to Thomson’s ISI Science Citation Index Data from 2002 http ://www.worldmapper.org/display.php?selected=205
  • 17. North South
  • 18. Closed Access Open Access
  • 19. http://vimeo.com/10169351
  • 20.  
  • 21. “ Weeds” or Vegetables?
  • 22. Access to Reading Access to Publishing Access to Funding Access to Participation Access to Sharing Access to Reward and Recognition Open
  • 23.  
  • 24. Reframe
  • 25. Big Deals Small Deals
  • 26. Private Interests Public Goods
  • 27. To Big to http://www.neoformix.com/2008/BushSpeechOnFinancialCrisisFAIL.html
  • 28. John Buschman Westport, CT: Libraries Unlimited, 2003 “ that the specific trends identified in librarianship that accommodate the new public philosophy of casting public cultural institutions in economic terms represent a further diminution of the democratic public sphere.”
  • 29. Human Development and Access to Knowledge-embedded goods Access to learning resources Access to journals Access to research and outcome data Access to health care Access to Medicine PUBLIC GOODS
  • 30. Argument Need for policy alignment and institutional redesign Governance of Knowledge Commons Rethink the values and reward system Social Accounting and Expanded Values
  • 31. Social and Sustainability Accounting
    • Scholarly knowledge as “merit good”
    What kind of “Business” are we in and what are we trying to “Sustain”?
  • 32. Broadening the definition of “success”, “impact”, “value” and “capital” Business value monetary return, financial capital, efficiency, competiveness Scholarly value Reputation and citation; trust; symbolic capital Institutional value Public mission, community outreach, intellectual capital Social value Equity, participation, diversity, social capital Political value Evidence based policy, transparency, accountability, civic capital
  • 33. Institutional Design
    • Sustainability as a set of institutional structures and processes that build and protect the knowledge commons (after Sumner 2005, Mook and Sumner 2010)
  • 34. A Challenge The 1% Solution
  • 35. “ Too often we think of scientific knowledge and the developing countries in terms of what “we” can do for “them”. We need to nurture the organizations and initiatives that challenge this limiting point of view, enriching the international scholarly community with important research and neglected perspectives from the developing world.” Lynne Copeland, Dean of Library Services & University Librarian, Simon Fraser University Library, Canada
  • 36. Thank You! [email_address] http://www.openoasis.org http://www.bioline.org.br