The egyptians at home
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The egyptians at home

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The egyptians at home The egyptians at home Presentation Transcript

  • The Egyptians at home
  • Food and DrinkFoodThe Egyptians ate many things. They also ate well. They atecalves and ducks a lot. Meat was expensive because there werevery little grazing spots for the animals.BreadMost people today would take our bread over Egyptian bread. Ithad a hard rough feel to it because when they were grinding theflour, sand would mix in with the grain. They couldn’t take it outbefore they baked it so the bread tasted kind of rough, like youreating dirt. Eating this gritty bread caused an Ancient Egyptiansteeth to wear down to the roots.DrinkDrinks were an important part of the meal. The rich drank wineand almost every body else drank beer. . To make their beer,they would half bake loaves of barley, crumble it into barley andwater. To make wine they picked a bunch of grapes andsqueezed all the juice out of them by stepping on them in a bigtrough.
  • Ancient Egyptians date candy recipe 1 cup of fresh dates 1 tbs of cinnamon ½ tbs of kardemam seed ½ cup of fresh ground walnuts small amount of warm honey dish full of fine ground walnuts method mix the dates with some water to paste mix in cinnamon and kardemam seed kneed in the walnutsform balls, spread with honey and cover in the ground almonds
  • HousesWood was almost non existent in Egypt. They used mostly mudand sand and papyrus reeds. Mud bricks were made of straw andmud. The mixture would dry and bake in the sun. The mudmight have been plentiful but it was not particularly sturdy. Inusually just a few years an Ancient Egyptians house constructed ofmud brick would begin to crumble.
  • Hunting, Fishing and FowlingHunting was kings and mainly a thing for kings andcourtiers. In the desert they could hunt wild bulls,gazelles, Oryx, antelopes and lions. King AmenhotepThe Third was proud of killing over 100 fierce lions inten years. He also killed 90 wild bulls on one huntingexpedition. As well as animals, the rivers wereplentiful in fish which could be caught with hooks ornets. The papyrus reeds also offered a variety ofbirds and geese. The technique here was to hurl athrowstick as the wild fowl flew up from thethickets.
  • Farming ancient Egyptians grew every thing they needed to eat. They grew crops such as barley, figs, melons etc. themost important crop was grain. The ancient Egyptians used grain to make bread, porridge, and beer. Grain wasthe first thing they planted after the flooding season. Once the grain was harvested they grew vegetables such asonions, leeks, cucumbers and lettuce. The Egyptians planted there crops along the banks of the river Nile, orkemet left behind after the floods.
  • Buying and sellingOn market days, the whole town heads for thelarge open space by the quayside. Farmers frommiles around come by boat to sell and tradetheir cattle, ducks and other produce. Familiesstock up wheat or barley, to bake bread or brewbeer, and linen for making clothes. Traders usecopper weights, in units called Deben (about 91grams). Egyptians have no money. An item isweighed, then traded for another item, or itemsof equal value.
  • The NileMost Egyptians lived near the river Nile as it provided food, water,transportation and excellent growing soil. Ancient Egypt could not have existedwithout the Nile. Since rainfall is almost non existent in Egypt, the floodsprovided the only source of moisture to sustain crops. Every year , heavysummer rain in the Ethiopian highlands, sent a torrent of water that overflowedthe Nile.