Pisa 2012 - en anglais

38,111
-1

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
38,111
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
17
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
57
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Pisa 2012 - en anglais

  1. 1. PISA 2012 Results: What Students Know and Can Do Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science Volume I Pr ogr am m e f or Int er nat ional St udent A s s es s m ent
  2. 2. PISA 2012 Results: What Students Know and Can Do Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science (Volume I)
  3. 3. This work is published on the responsibility of the Secretary-General of the OECD. The opinions expressed and arguments employed herein do not necessarily reflect the official views of the Organisation or of the governments of its member countries. This document and any map included herein are without prejudice to the status of or sovereignty over any territory, to the delimitation of international frontiers and boundaries and to the name of any territory, city or area. Please cite this publication as: OECD (2013), PISA 2012 Results: What Students Know and Can Do – Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science (Volume I), PISA, OECD Publishing. http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264201118-en ISBN 978-92-64-20110-1 (print) ISBN 978-92-64-20111-8 (PDF) Note by Turkey: The information in this document with reference to “Cyprus” relates to the southern part of the Island. There is no single authority representing both Turkish and Greek Cypriot people on the Island. Turkey recognises the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus (TRNC). Until a lasting and equitable solution is found within the context of the United Nations, Turkey shall preserve its position concerning the “Cyprus issue”. Note by all the European Union Member States of the OECD and the European Union: The Republic of Cyprus is recognised by all members of the United Nations with the exception of Turkey. The information in this document relates to the area under the effective control of the Government of the Republic of Cyprus. The statistical data for Israel are supplied by and under the responsibility of the relevant Israeli authorities. The use of such data by the OECD is without prejudice to the status of the Golan Heights, East Jerusalem and Israeli settlements in the West Bank under the terms of international law. Photo credits: © Flying Colours Ltd /Getty Images © Jacobs Stock Photography /Kzenon © khoa vu /Flickr /Getty Images © Mel Curtis /Corbis © Shutterstock /Kzenon © Simon Jarratt /Corbis Corrigenda to OECD publications may be found on line at: www.oecd.org/publishing/corrigenda. © OECD 2013 You can copy, download or print OECD content for your own use, and you can include excerpts from OECD publications, databases and multimedia products in your own documents, presentations, blogs, websites and teaching materials, provided that suitable acknowledgement of OECD as source and copyright owner is given. All requests for public or commercial use and translation rights should be submitted to rights@oecd.org. Requests for permission to photocopy portions of this material for public or commercial use shall be addressed directly to the Copyright Clearance Center (CCC) at info@copyright.com or the Centre français d’exploitation du droit de copie (CFC) at contact@cfcopies.com.
  4. 4. Foreword Equipping citizens with the skills necessary to achieve their full potential, participate in an increasingly interconnected global economy, and ultimately convert better jobs into better lives is a central preoccupation of policy makers around the world. Results from the OECD’s recent Survey of Adult Skills show that highly skilled adults are twice as likely to be employed and almost three times more likely to earn an above-median salary than poorly skilled adults. In other words, poor skills severely limit people’s access to better-paying and more rewarding jobs. Highly skilled people are also more likely to volunteer, see themselves as actors rather than as objects of political processes, and are more likely to trust others. Fairness, integrity and inclusiveness in public policy thus all hinge on the skills of citizens. The ongoing economic crisis has only increased the urgency of investing in the acquisition and development of citizens’ skills – both through the education system and in the workplace. At a time when public budgets are tight and there is little room for further monetary and fiscal stimulus, investing in structural reforms to boost productivity, such as education and skills development, is key to future growth. Indeed, investment in these areas is essential to support the recovery, as well as to address long-standing issues such as youth unemployment and gender inequality. In this context, more and more countries are looking beyond their own borders for evidence of the most successful and efficient policies and practices. Indeed, in a global economy, success is no longer measured against national standards alone, but against the best-performing and most rapidly improving education systems. Over the past decade, the OECD Programme for International Student Assessment, PISA, has become the world’s premier yardstick for evaluating the quality, equity and efficiency of school systems. But the evidence base that PISA has produced goes well beyond statistical benchmarking. By identifying the characteristics of high-performing education systems PISA allows governments and educators to identify effective policies that they can then adapt to their local contexts. The results from the PISA 2012 assessment, which was conducted at a time when many of the 65 participating countries and economies were grappling with the effects of the crisis, reveal wide differences in education outcomes, both within and across countries. Using the data collected in previous PISA rounds, we have been able to track the evolution of student performance over time and across subjects. Of the 64 countries and economies with comparable data, 40 improved their average performance in at least one subject. Top performers such as Shanghai in China or Singapore were able to further extend their lead, while countries like Brazil, Mexico, Tunisia and Turkey achieved major improvements from previously low levels of performance. Some education systems have demonstrated that it is possible to secure strong and equitable learning outcomes at the same time as achieving rapid improvements. Of the 13 countries and economies that significantly improved their mathematics performance between 2003 and 2012, three also show improvements in equity in education during the same period, and another nine improved their performance while maintaining an already high level of equity – proving that countries do not have to sacrifice high performance to achieve equity in education opportunities. Nonetheless, PISA 2012 results show wide differences between countries in mathematics performance. The equivalent of almost six years of schooling, 245 score points, separates the highest and lowest average performances What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I  © OECD 2013 3
  5. 5. Foreword of the countries that took part in the PISA 2012 mathematics assessment. The difference in mathematics performances within countries is even greater, with over 300 points – the equivalent of more than seven years of schooling – often separating the highest- and the lowest-achieving students in a country. Clearly, all countries and economies have excellent students, but few have enabled all students to excel. The report also reveals worrying gender differences in students’ attitudes towards mathematics: even when girls perform as well as boys in mathematics, they report less perseverance, less motivation to learn mathematics, less belief in their own mathematics skills, and higher levels of anxiety about mathematics. While the average girl underperforms in mathematics compared with the average boy, the gender gap in favour of boys is even wider among the highest-achieving students. These findings have serious implications not only for higher education, where young women are already underrepresented in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields of study, but also later on, when these young women enter the labour market. This confirms the findings of the OECD Gender Strategy, which identifies some of the factors that create – and widen – the gender gap in education, labour and entrepreneurship. Supporting girls’ positive attitudes towards and investment in learning mathematics will go a long way towards narrowing this gap. PISA 2012 also finds that the highest-performing school systems are those that allocate educational resources more equitably among advantaged and disadvantaged schools and that grant more autonomy over curricula and assessments to individual schools. A belief that all students can achieve at a high level and a willingness to engage all stakeholders in education – including students, through such channels as seeking student feedback on teaching practices – are hallmarks of successful school systems. PISA is not only an accurate indicator of students’ abilities to participate fully in society after compulsory school, but also a powerful tool that countries and economies can use to fine-tune their education policies. There is no single combination of policies and practices that will work for everyone, everywhere. Every country has room for improvement, even the top performers. That’s why the OECD produces this triennial report on the state of education across the globe: to share evidence of the best policies and practices and to offer our timely and targeted support to help countries provide the best education possible for all of their students. With high levels of youth unemployment, rising inequality, a significant gender gap, and an urgent need to boost growth in many countries, we have no time to lose. The OECD stands ready to support policy makers in this challenging and crucial endeavour. Angel Gurría OECD Secretary-General 4 © OECD 2013  What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I
  6. 6. Acknowledgements This report is the product of a collaborative effort between the countries participating in PISA, the experts and institutions working within the framework of the PISA Consortium, and the OECD Secretariat. The report was drafted by Andreas Schleicher, Francesco Avvisati, Francesca Borgonovi, Miyako Ikeda, Hiromichi Katayama, Flore-Anne Messy, Chiara Monticone, Guillermo Montt, Sophie Vayssettes and Pablo Zoido of the OECD Directorate for Education and Skills and the Directorate for Financial Affairs, with statistical support from Simone Bloem and Giannina Rech and editorial oversight by Marilyn Achiron. Additional analytical and editorial support was provided by Adele Atkinson, Jonas Bertling, Marika  Boiron, Célia Braga-Schich, Tracey Burns, Michael Davidson, Cassandra Davis, Elizabeth  Del  Bourgo, John A. Dossey, Joachim Funke, Samuel Greiff, Tue Halgreen, Ben Jensen, Eckhard Klieme, André Laboul, Henry Levin, Juliette Mendelovits, Tadakazu  Miki, Christian  Monseur, Simon Normandeau, Mathilde Overduin, Elodie Pools, Dara Ramalingam, William H. Schmidt (whose work was supported by the Thomas J. Alexander fellowship programme), Kaye Stacey, Lazar Stankov, Ross Turner, Elisabeth Villoutreix and Allan Wigfield. The system‑level data collection was conducted by the OECD NESLI (INES Network for the Collection and Adjudication of System-Level Descriptive Information on Educational Structures, Policies and Practices) team: Bonifacio Agapin, Estelle Herbaut and Jean Yip. Volume II also draws on the analytic work undertaken by Jaap Scheerens and Douglas Willms in the context of PISA 2000. Administrative support was provided by Claire Chetcuti, Juliet Evans, Jennah Huxley and Diana Tramontano. The OECD contracted the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) to manage the development of the mathematics, problem solving and financial literacy frameworks for PISA 2012. Achieve was also contracted by the OECD to develop the mathematics framework with ACER. The expert group that guided the preparation of the mathematics assessment framework and instruments was chaired by Kaye Stacey; Joachim Funke chaired the expert group that guided the preparation of the problem-solving assessment framework and instruments; and Annamaria  Lusardi led the expert group that guided the preparation of the financial literacy assessment framework and instruments. The PISA assessment instruments and the data underlying the report were prepared by the PISA Consortium, under the direction of Raymond Adams at ACER. The development of the report was steered by the PISA Governing Board, which is chaired by Lorna Bertrand (United Kingdom), with Benő Csapó (Hungary), Daniel McGrath (United States) and Ryo Watanabe (Japan) as vice chairs. Annex C of the volumes lists the members of the various PISA bodies, as well as the individual experts and consultants who have contributed to this report and to PISA in general. What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I  © OECD 2013 5
  7. 7. Table of Contents Executive Summary�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  17 Reader’s Guide��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  21 CHAPTER 1 What is PISA?�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  23 What does the PISA 2012 survey measure?����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  25 Who are the PISA students?���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  26 What is the test like?�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  27 How is the test conducted?����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  29 What kinds of results does the test provide?��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  29 Where can you find the results?������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  29 CHAPTER 2 A Profile of Student Performance in Mathematics ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  31 A context for comparing the mathematics performance of countries and economies����������������������������������������������������������������������  34 The PISA approach to assessing student performance in mathematics���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  37 • The PISA definition of mathematical literacy�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  37 • The PISA 2012 framework for assessing mathematics �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  37 • Example 1: WHICH CAR?��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  41 • Example 2: CLIMBING MOUNT FUJI����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  42 • How the PISA 2012 mathematics results are reported ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  44 • How mathematics proficiency levels are defined in PISA 2012 ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  46 Student performance in mathematics ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  46 • Average performance in mathematics�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  46 • Trends in average mathematics performance�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  51 • Trends in mathematics performance adjusted for sampling and demographic changes�����������������������������������������������������������������������  58 • Students at the different levels of proficiency in mathematics�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  60 • Trends in the percentage of low- and top-performers in mathematics����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  69 • Variation in student performance in mathematics�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  71 • Gender differences in mathematics performance���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  71 • Trends in gender differences in mathematics performance�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  74 Student performance in different areas of mathematics������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  79 • Process subscales����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  79 • Content subscales���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  95 Examples of PISA mathematics units����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  125 CHAPTER 3 Measuring Opportunities to Learn Mathematics���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  145 Opportunity to learn and student achievement����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  150 Differences in opportunities to learn����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  156 Questions used for the construction of the three opportunity to learn indices�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������  170 The three opportunity to learn indices������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  172 What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I  © OECD 2013 7
  8. 8. Table of contents CHAPTER 4 A Profile of Student Performance in Reading����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  175 Student performance in reading���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  176 • Average performance in reading��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  176 • Trends in average reading performance����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  181 • Trends in reading performance adjusted for sampling and demographic changes��������������������������������������������������������������������������������  187 • Students at the different levels of proficiency in reading��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  190 • Trends in the percentage of low- and top-performers in reading�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  197 • Variation in student performance in reading�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  199 • Gender differences in reading performance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  199 • Trends in gender difference in reading performance ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  201 Examples of PISA reading units�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  203 CHAPTER 5 A Profile of Student Performance in Science�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  215 Student performance in science���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  216 • Average performance in science��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  216 • Trends in average science performance����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  218 • Trends in science performance adjusted for sampling and demographic changes��������������������������������������������������������������������������������  229 • Students at the different levels of proficiency in science��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  230 • Trends in the percentage of low- and top-performers in science�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  235 • Variation in student performance in science�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  239 • Gender differences in science performance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  239 • Trends in gender difference in science performance ���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  241 Examples of PISA science units�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  242 CHAPTER 6 Policy Implications of Student Performance in PISA 2012��������������������������������������������������������������������  251 Improving average performance��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  252 Pursuing excellence�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  253 Tackling low performance�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  254 Assessing strengths and weaknesses in different kinds of mathematics�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  254 Providing equal opportunities for boys and girls��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  255 ANNEX A PISA 2012 Technical background������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  257 Annex A1 Annex A2 Annex A3 Annex A4 Annex A5 Annex A6 Annex A7 ANNEX B Annex B1 Annex B2 Annex B3 Annex B4 PISA 2012 Data�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  297 ANNEX C 8 Indices from the student, school and parent context questionnaires�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   258 The PISA target population, the PISA samples and the definition of schools���������������������������������������������������������������������������������  265 Technical notes on analyses in this volume���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  277 Quality assurance�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  279 Technical details of trends analyses��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  280 Development of the PISA assessment instruments������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  294 Technical note on Brazil���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  295 THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF PISA – A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT������������������������������   555 Results for countries and economies������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  298 Results for regions within countries��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  405 Results for the computer-based and combined scales for mathematics and reading���������������������������������������������������������������  491 Trends in mathematics, reading and science performance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  537 © OECD 2013  What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I
  9. 9. Table of contents BOXES Box I.1.1  A test the whole world can take����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  24 Box I.1.2  Key features of PISA 2012���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  26 Box I.2.1  What does performance in PISA say about readiness for further education and a career?����������������������������������������������������������������������  32 Box I.2.2  Measuring trends in PISA����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  52 Box I.2.3 Top performers and all-rounders in PISA�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  64 Box I.2.4 Improving in PISA: Brazil����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  76 Box I.2.5 Improving in PISA: Turkey������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   122 Box I.4.1  Improving in PISA: Korea�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   188 Box I.5.1  Improving in PISA: Estonia����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   238 FIGURES Figure I.1.1 Map of PISA countries and economies����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  25 Figure I.1.2 Summary of the assessment areas in PISA 2012�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  28 Figure I.2.1  Mathematics performance and Gross Domestic Product������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.2  Mathematics performance and spending on education���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.3  Mathematics performance and parents’ education������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.4  Mathematics performance and share of socio-economically disadvantaged students�������������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.5  Mathematics performance and proportion of students from an immigrant background���������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.6  Equivalence of the PISA assessment across cultures and languages�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  35 Figure I.2.7  Main features of the PISA 2012 mathematics framework������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  37 Figure I.2.8 Categories describing the items constructed for the PISA 2012 mathematics assessment������������������������������������������������������������������  40 Figure I.2.9 Classification of sample items, by process, context and content categories and response type ������������������������������������������������������  41 Figure I.2.10  Which Car? – a unit from the PISA 2012 main survey�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  42 Figure I.2.11  Climbing Mount Fuji – a unit from the field trial �����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  43 Figure I.2.12  The relationship between questions and student performance on a scale�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  45 Figure I.2.13 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance in mathematics�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  47 Figure I.2.14 Mathematics performance among PISA 2012 participants, at national and regional levels �������������������������������������������������������������  48 Figure I.2.15  Annualised change in mathematics performance throughout participation in PISA Figure I.2.16  Curvilinear trajectories of average mathematics performance across PISA assessments Figure I.2.17 Multiple comparisons of mathematics performance between 2003 and 2012��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  56 Figure I.2.18  Relationship between annualised change in performance and average PISA 2003 mathematics scores���������������������������������������  58 Figure I.2.19  Adjusted and observed annualised performance change in average PISA mathematics scores��������������������������������������������������������  59 Figure I.2.20 Map of selected mathematics questions, by proficiency level���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  60 Figure I.2.21 Summary descriptions for the six levels of proficiency in mathematics����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  61 Figure I.2.22  Proficiency in mathematics�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  62 Figure I.2.a  Overlapping of top performers in mathematics, reading and science on average across OECD countries�����������������������������������  64 Figure I.2.b  Top performers in mathematics, reading and science�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  65 Figure I.2.23  Percentage of low-performing students and top performers in mathematics in 2003 and 2012�������������������������������������������������������  70 Figure I.2.24  Relationship between performance in mathematics and variation in performance �����������������������������������������������������������������������������  72 Figure I.2.25  Gender differences in mathematics performance �������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  73 ������������������������������������������������������������������������  52 ����������������������������������������������������������������  55 What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I  © OECD 2013 9
  10. 10. Table of contents Figure I.2.26  Proficiency in mathematics among boys and girls�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  74 Figure I.2.27  Change between 2003 and 2012 in gender differences in mathematics performance������������������������������������������������������������������������  75 Figure I.2.c  Observed and expected trends in mathematics performance for Brazil (2003-12)�������������������������������������������������������������������������������  77 Figure I.2.28 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale formulating������������������������������������������������������  80 Figure I.2.29 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels for the mathematical subscale formulating�������������������������������������������������������  81 Figure I.2.30  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale formulating�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  82 Figure I.2.31 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale employing��������������������������������������������������������  84 Figure I.2.32 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels for the mathematical subscale employing���������������������������������������������������������  85 Figure I.2.33  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale employing���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  86 Figure I.2.34 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale interpreting������������������������������������������������������  87 Figure I.2.35 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels for the mathematical subscale interpreting�������������������������������������������������������  88 Figure I.2.36  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale interpreting�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  90 Figure I.2.37 Comparing countries and economies on the different mathematics process subscales�����������������������������������������������������������������������  91 Figure I.2.38 Where countries and economies rank on the different mathematics process subscales���������������������������������������������������������������������  92 Figure I.2.39a  Gender differences in performance on the formulating subscale����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  96 Figure I.2.39b  Gender differences in performance on the employing subscale�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  97 Figure I.2.39c  Gender differences in performance on the interpreting subscale��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������  98 Figure I.2.40 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale change and relationships����������������������������  99 Figure I.2.41 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels for the mathematical subscale change and relationships��������������������������   100 Figure I.2.42  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale change and relationships��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   101 Figure I.2.43 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale space and shape ���������������������������������������   102 Figure I.2.44 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels for the mathematical subscale space and shape������������������������������������������   103 Figure I.2.45  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale space and shape������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   104 Figure I.2.46 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale quantity���������������������������������������������������������   106 Figure I.2.47 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels on the mathematical subscale quantity����������������������������������������������������������   107 Figure I.2.48  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale quantity����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   108 Figure I.2.49 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance on the mathematics subscale uncertainty and data���������������������������������   109 Figure I.2.50 Summary descriptions of the six proficiency levels on the mathematical subscale uncertainty and data����������������������������������   110 Figure I.2.51  Proficiency in the mathematics subscale uncertainty and data����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   111 Figure I.2.52 Comparing countries and economies on the different mathematics content subscales��������������������������������������������������������������������   113 Figure I.2.53 Where countries and economies rank on the different mathematics content subscales������������������������������������������������������������������   114 Figure I.2.54a  Gender differences in performance on the change and relationships subscale�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������   118 Figure I.2.54b  Gender differences in performance on the space and shape subscale��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   119 Figure I.2.54c  Gender differences in performance on the quantity subscale�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   120 Figure I.2.54d   Gender differences in performance on the uncertainty and data subscale������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   121 Figure I.2.55  CLIMBING MOUNT FUJI�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   128 Figure I.2.57  REVOLVING DOOR ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   131 Figure I.2.58  Which car?�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   134 Figure I.2.59  Charts����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   137 Figure I.2.60  GARAGE���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   140 Figure I.3.1a  Students’ exposure to word problems���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   147 Figure I.3.1b  Students’ exposure to formal mathematics������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   148 Figure I.3.1c  10 HELEN THE CYCLIST���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   125 Figure I.2.56  Students’ exposure to applied mathematics����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   149 © OECD 2013  What Students Know and Can Do: Student Performance in Mathematics, Reading and Science – Volume I
  11. 11. Table of contents Figure I.3.2  Relationship between mathematics performance and students’ exposure to applied mathematics���������������������������������������������   150 Figure I.3.3 Country-level regressions between opportunity to learn variables and mathematics performance at the student and school levels�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   151 Figure I.3.4a  Relationship between the index of exposure to word problems and students’ mathematics performance��������������������������������   152 Figure I.3.4b  Relationship between the index of exposure to formal mathematics and students’ mathematics performance�����������������������   153 Figure I.3.4c  Relationship between the index of exposure to applied mathematics and students’ mathematics performance���������������������   154 Figure I.3.5 Significance of exposure to applied mathematics�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   155 Figure I.3.6  Percentage of students who reported having seen applied mathematics problems like “calculating the power consumption of an electric appliance per week” frequently or sometimes��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   157 Figure I.3.7  Percentage of students who reported having seen applied mathematics problems like “calculating how many square metres of tiles you need to cover a floor” frequently or sometimes����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   158 Figure I.3.8  Percentage of students who reported having seen formal mathematics problems in their mathematics lessons frequently or sometimes�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   159 Figure I.3.9  Percentage of students who reported having seen word problems in their mathematics lessons frequently or sometimes��������   160 Figure I.3.10  Percentage of students who reported having seen applied problems in mathematics in their mathematics lessons frequently or sometimes����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   162 Figure I.3.11 Percentage of students who reported having seen real-world problems in their mathematics lessons frequently  or sometimes�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   163 Figure I.3.12  Student exposure to mathematics problems ��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   164 Figure I.3.13  Percentage of students who reported having seen linear equations often or knowing the concept well  and understanding it�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   165 Figure I.3.14  Percentage of students who reported having seen complex numbers often or knowing the concept well  and understanding it�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   166 Figure I.3.15  Percentage of students who reported having seen exponential functions often or knowing the concept well and understanding it�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   167 Figure I.3.16  Percentage of students who reported having seen quadratic functions often or knowing the concept well  and understanding it�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   168 Figure I.3.17  Exposure to applied mathematics vs. exposure to formal mathematics�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   169 Figure I.4.1 Comparing countries’ and economies’ performance in reading��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   177 Figure I.4.2 Reading performance among PISA 2012 participants, at national and regional levels �������������������������������������������������������������������   178 Figure I.4.3  Annualised change in reading performance throughout participation in PISA ����������������������������������������������������������������������������������   182 Figure I.4.4  Curvilinear trajectories of average reading performance across PISA assessments����������������������������������������������������������������������������   183 Figure I.4.5 Multiple comparisons of reading performance between 2000 and 2012���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   184 Figure I.4.6  Relationship between annualised change in performance and average PISA 2000 reading scores����������������������������������������������   186 Figure I.4.7  Adjusted and observed annualised performance change in average PISA reading scores���������������������������������������������������������������   188 Figure I.4.8 Summary description for the seven levels of proficiency in print reading in PISA 2012������������������������������������������������������������������   191 Figure I.4.9 Map of selected reading questions, by proficiency level����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   192 Figure I.4.10  Proficiency in reading��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������   194 Figure I.4.11 Percentage of low-performing students and top performers in reading in 2000 and 2012��������������������������������������������������������������   198 Figure I.4.12  Gender differences in reading performance������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������

×