Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Edtec jan26 Pastor/Frazee
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Edtec jan26 Pastor/Frazee

322
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
322
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Context: ITS at SDSU sits at the juncture between mature, large scale technologies and and those at the bleeding edge.Each "area" has upended a traditional way of doing things
  • Examples:Infrared, RF Clickers, may give way to mobile devices using PollAnywhere.comSmartBoard, functionality replicated by iPad and SyncPadCeiling mounted camera, easier to use a Flip cameraImplications: Replace established infrastructure, we're learning not to be too attached to any one thing; to phone or not to phone in classroom?Photo by TorbeinR√łnning. Creative Commons License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://flic.kr/p/6ghVBP
  • Examples:Use of online video in class, BlackboardLecture capture, screencasts, student projects, movie clipsImplications: Spurs new types of discourse, re-examine Accessibility, Copyright, IPKids learn how to write "creative writing" essays, quoting from a range of sources to make their point. They should learn how to make remixed videos, quoting and integrating the work of others to make their point. As with good writing, good remixing is hard. As with writing, there are important rules and norms the creator must learn. But as with writing, this is a form of expression that should be spread broadly in our culture -- especially because most kids spend so much of their time watching rather than reading.Photo by Jonas Bengtsson. Creative Commons License. Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) http://flic.kr/p/4Qx6hXLawrence LessigProfessor of Law, Harvard Law School
  • Examples: Web conferencing, Google Docs, Dropbox, Social networking -- FaceBook, LinkedInImplications: Higher velocity of expectations, Cultivates faster workflow, Reconsider our conceptions of identity, privacyPhoto by Jason Nicholls. Creative Commons License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)http://flic.kr/p/5qShAn
  • Transcript

    • 1. Revolution or Evolution: Technology and Change in Higher Education
      Emerging Technologies for Learning
    • 2. What happened to my infrastructure? Is anyone paying attention?
      Portable, Powerful Devices
      Photo by TorbeinR√łnning. Creative Commons License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://flic.kr/p/6ghVBP
    • 3. Remixing as a form of discourse? What about accessibility & copyright?
      Anytime, Anywhere Media
      Photo by Jonas Bengtsson. Creative Commons License. Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0) http://flic.kr/p/4Qx6hX
    • 4. Is faster better? How do we define identity, privacyand appropriateness?
      Easy, Ubiquitous Collaboration
      Photo by Jason Nicholls. Creative Commons License. Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 Generic (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) http://flic.kr/p/5qShAn
    • 5. Revolution or Evolution: Technology and Change in Higher Education
      Next: institutional challenges
    • 6. Crisis and opportunity
    • 7. an ethos of experimentation
    • 8. Starting from scratch
    • 9. The students of tomorrow
    • 10. Going virtual
    • 11. Learning spaces
    • 12. Learning analytics
    • 13. Revolution or Evolution: Technology and Change in Higher Education
      Thank you!