The Business Value of UX: Exceeding expectations
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The Business Value of UX: Exceeding expectations

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A business case for UX, covering the Why, What, How and Who for folks getting into the discipline. Equally suitable for wrapping fish.

A business case for UX, covering the Why, What, How and Who for folks getting into the discipline. Equally suitable for wrapping fish.
Presented at the IIBA virtual conference, March 2014

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  • Thank you all for the opportunity to present today.One of the challenges of this format is that I don’t have a clue about who you are, what your backgrounds are and how much you already know about the topic.Before I begin, a brief bit about me.
  • The topic of User Experience is broad and deep. Today’s presentation will focus on the business value of UX because, ostensibly, you are all focused on the needs of your business.Even with focusing on business value, I will be moving quickly through the material to leave time at the end for questions or areas you want to go into more deeply.
  • In this first section, I re-present a few slides from a report GE’s UX group crafted in late 2011 focusing specifically on the business impact of user experiences. Holding off for the moment what we mean by UX...
  • What many believe started with the iPhone has now permeated our lives: thermostats, web experiences, televisions and even industrial controls are benefiting from baking in user experience
  • What many businesses are beginning to realize is that everything they produce is the User Experience – not a product, not a service, not a feature
  • “stickiness” in the context of the web is merely a subset of a broader notion of customer loyalty. Building compelling experiences is often the best way to both attract and keep customers.
  • This is usually considered the heart and soul of UX – improving productivity
  • As long as you take the broad view that any system must include the human being, all of these numbers are true. In some studies, for example, up front UX design and research actually reduces the cost of deployment by a factor of 100.
  • Alright – so what do I mean by UX?
  • A World-class User Experience is in the “sweet spot” where business, technology and user needs intersect.In the commonly used BTU model on the right, world-class UX only occurs in the center, where business goals, technology capabilities and user delight converge.In the diagram to the left, Jesse James Garret suggests all experiences both rest on and inform business strategy at their foundation. From there, the scope, supporting systems and architecture, and finally the specific designs, both system and experience are expressed, supporting the presentation of the experience itself. Many believe UX is merely UI design, but to ignore these deeper elements is to miss delivering a world-class experience.
  • It is the provenance of “emotion”It is also a “second order” discipline – not only aren’t we the user, we can’t expect our users to know what the next experience needs to be.
  • User Experience design is responsible for a wide variety of engagements – not just the use of a product or servicePerhaps a different way to consider the problem is through the lens of the User Journey Map. This happens to be for a boxed product, but could easily be adjusted to encompass enterprise apps, services and the like.Key here is the extent of engagement User Experience professionals have with users throughout their journey.Consider the following thought experiment – how might “just-in-time-training” way over in Intermittent Use, be affected by word of mouth far earlier in the awareness building stage?
  • So, given the broad brush description of the what – it’s important to understand the “how” – because what UX folks do is somewhat skewed from what other researchers and analysts do
  • Charles Owen of the Institute of Design at the Illinois Institute of Technology suggests different forms of thinking can be distinguished by two axes: analytic to synthetic and real to symbolic.He suggests different disciplines reside in different quadrants (science, law, engineering). He suggests they aren’t limited to that quadrant, just that its “center of gravity” is there. Vijay Kumar, also from the Institute of Design built on Owen’s 2x2 model. Still 2 axes, but they’ve changed – Synthetic becomes “Make”, Analytic becomes “Know”Kumar begins to trace a path through the quadrants, suggesting we start at the center with a hypothesis, do our research, analyze our results, come to some conceptual understanding (still abstract, but now being “made”), until we get to an artifact or result we actually implementSteve Sato, educated at IIT and now Co-Chair of the Design Management Institute puts it in yet another slightly modified form:Abstract becomes “Reflect” and Real becomes “Act.”What each of these individuals agree on, irrespective of the specific labels on the axes, is that Design Thinking is a journey through the quadrants in an effort to find a “best fit” solution to the original hypothesis.In other words, Design Thinking requires us to make a set of guesses, test those against the environment, revise, rinse, repeat. For designers, this cycle is taught in school and all too familiar. Mature designers become very adept at it – they move quickly through the cycle – sometimes many times an hour. Without design thinking, we can’t achieve World Class UX
  • There are many ways of describing how we can move through the design cycle. The diagram I use describes the approach some of us take within IT in Intel. We identify several stages in a design process, somewhat aligned with the Owens/Kumar/Sato model: User Insights, Modeling, Craftwork and Development. In a classic waterfall product development process – the NPI, PLC or phase gate approach – teams would advance up the stair step as illustrated on the left. In an Agile model, while we might get an early start on insights and research, in fact, all elements can be done almost simultaneously. What this means in practical terms is we’re actually crafting the UX as a means of doing research; we don’t “wait” for design but begin designing right away. This is the theory behind the “Lean UX” movement.Also important to note: this work not only can begin at program initiation it should: insights identified through design research have the power to affect business strategy, expose new markets and impact program definition.To think back to the Owens/Kumar/Sato model, it’s as if we are moving through the cycle instantaneously – and it often feels that way – we might conceptualize in the presence of users (or they may conceptualize in our presence) leading to greater insights, a change in our models and so forth
  • UX teams have dozens of tools in their toolkits ranging from analysis through Persona creation, presumptive design and prototypingThe handful of tools identified in the lower arrow tend to drive the insights and modeling activities, while the upper tools tend to drive craftwork and design development. Regardless, teams choose the least cost tool providing the greatest value and outcome.
  • Designers are dreamers: we envision things that don’t yet existWe live in the land of “possibility thinking” – what philosophers call “abductive reasoning” – what we used to call “play pretend”We take facts, the current reality, and we play games, imagining “what if” UX teams must have a mixture of dreamer/designers and well grounded realists, visionaries and planners, right-brainers and left.
  • I am not a big fan of the “democratization” of design. I believe design is as much a profession as teaching, doctoring, or lawyering, but UX is a broad discipline requiring a wide range of skills beyond design. To get UX baked into a product or service, it needs to be baked into the development process, starting at the top of the organization – the business, portfolio or service owners, along with the program managers must become our greatest promoters and cheerleaders.
  • We asked our UX and BA teams to identify the responsibilities unique to and/or shared by each domain. Of particular interest is the issue of “ownership.” Who “owns” the user experience? In the original exercise, we asked each participant to rate each element with Hi/Med/Lo in terms of their domain’s “ownership”Other topics that emerged from our conversation was the notion that “business process” wasn’t limited to business systems, but rather to business strategies. Who “owns” the strategy conversation?The domain of User Experience – being the confluence of viability, feasibility and desirability – requires x-disciplinary thinking including business, technology and design resources
  • So, to bring it back to the business value – we need to understand when it’s worth investing and how muchMacro view: Not all problems are worth the investment to fix. World-class means “best-fit” to business, technology and user drivers.Micro view: The organization must make an investment, at any and all levels, to address even the minimum required user experience. Achieving a “professional” level of skill takes years; we will not achieve our corporate strategy through organic growth and training alone.
  • Okay. So that was a lot. Before I open it up for questions, let me offer you a few resources and final thoughts.
  • How can you participate and how can you leverage the skills you already have?How do these activities differ from or are similar to the current work you are already doing?
  • If you are interested in direct research, learn about user-research and how it differs from business analysis researchIf you have a coworker who seems to be complaining a lot about the current situation, maybe they’re a designer!If you are able to “play pretend” and can imagine the future – drive visioning workshops in your group to set their “north star.”
  • Competition can’t address your company’s experiencesAddressing users means improving productivity, customer loyalty and user performanceAddressing developers means reducing costs, improving quality and time to market

The Business Value of UX: Exceeding expectations The Business Value of UX: Exceeding expectations Presentation Transcript

  • The Business Value of User Experience World-Class Experiences that exceed expectations and drive business value Leo Frishberg – Intel Sales and Marketing IT Product Design Manager IIBA 2014
  • World-class User Experience: A Global Perspective Why is a World-class UX important? What is World-class UX? How do you craft a World-class UX? Who is responsible? Where do you go from here?
  • Why a World-class UX?
  • External Drivers are Changing the UX Landscape Consumers, customers and business partners are continually experiencing delightful interactions with technology… From: The Business Value of UX – GE Center of Excellence
  • UX Makes Business Sense As product features become commoditized, the major differentiator is the user experience. Customers will pay more for delightful experiences From: The Business Value of UX – GE Center of Excellence
  • When the Competition is the Cloud Retaining customers and increasing loyalty is the new metric. Great UX increases “switching costs” and with it, customer loyalty From: The Business Value of UX – GE Center of Excellence
  • UX Focuses on the Customer Whether you measure productivity or performance, UX provides significant, measurable improvement From: The Business Value of UX – GE Center of Excellence
  • UX Improves Product Development Processes Whether it’s time to delivery, development costs, or product quality, when UX is integrated into the product lifecycle, good things happen From: The Business Value of UX – GE Center of Excellence
  • What is World-class UX?
  • Business Technology Users World-class User Experience World-class UX Design is World-class System Design From: The Elements of User Experience – Jesse James Garrett
  • World-class UX is about Emotion and Time-and-Motion Imagine you are a carpenter at Heathrow airport…  … and you are now responsible for testing counter-terrorism plans
  • World-class UX is about Emotion and Time-and-Motion Imagine you are a carpenter at Heathrow airport…  … and you are now responsible for testing counter-terrorism plans Imagine you are a telephone sub-station technician…  …and you are now responsible for managing 500 television channels
  • World-class UX is about Emotion and Time-and-Motion Imagine you are a carpenter at Heathrow airport…  … and you are now responsible for testing counter-terrorism plans Imagine you are a telephone sub-station technician…  …and you are now responsible for managing 500 television channels Imagine you are an electronic engineer debugging a circuit...  ...and you need to find the one wrong bit out of 8GB of data
  • World-class UX is about Emotion and Time-and-Motion Imagine you are a carpenter at Heathrow airport…  … and you are now responsible for testing counter-terrorism plans Imagine you are a telephone sub-station technician…  …and you are now responsible for managing 500 television channels Imagine you are an electronic engineer debugging a circuit...  ...and you need to find the one wrong bit out of 8GB of data Imagine you are a salesperson sitting on an airplane…  …and you want to influence the C-level executive sitting next to you
  • World-class User Experiences Span the Entire User Journey
  • World-class User Experiences Span the Entire User Journey
  • World-class User Experiences Span the Entire User Journey
  • How do we build a World-class UX?
  • World-class UX Requires Design Thinking From: CHIFOO September, 2013 – Presentation – Steve Sato
  • An Agile User Experience Design Process
  • User Experience Toolkit
  • Who does UX?
  • In World-class UX Design, Everyone Has a Part to Play Training Specialist Solution Quality Analyst Practitioner Feedback, Closed Loop Testing Business Analyst Systems Analyst BI Analyst UCD practitioner Research, Work-flow Analysis, Task Analysis Developer/Tech Comms (including Enterprise, Non-Enterprise, Mobile, Client and Web) Technical integration UI development UI design practitioner Integrate into and Inform UX of engineering fundamentals Portfolio and Service Owners Program and Project Managers UX Advocate Promote UX value Build UX into decision making, plans and strategies UX (Product, IT, Service, Organizational design) UX Architect, Designer, Researcher Full Cycle of Services – Planning, Research, Prototyping, Design, Closed Loop How roles grow/transform with UX adoption Adapted From UX in IT, 201 – SAI, Intel
  • Together, BA and UX teams craft and measure experiences that deliver business value and delight our users beyond their expectations. Acceptance criteria Info design Accessibility Interface to the business/stakeholder Build vs. Buy decision Interface to the user Business Analysis (non-tech) business needs Overall solution experience Business Analysis (tech) - technology/constraints Requirements definition/User Stories Business process analysis/re-engineering SME/Stakeholder Research Business task prioritization Strategy and ideation Client side Coding UI & Interaction design Context scenarios, keypath identification Usability Testing Contextual Inquiry Use Cases Copywriting/editing User Modeling Define Business Rules User Research Define Scope of the project/product Validation of the solution to business needs Definition of business problem/goal Validation of the solution to user needs Design the Big Picture Experience (cross apps/platforms) Wireframe and Prototype Design Incorporation of industry UX best practices Work with tech team to understand technical constraints Info architecture Workflow modeling
  • Risk/Benefit Analysis Drives Investment “Micro-economic” View“Macro-economic” View From UX in IT, 201 – SAI, Intel
  • Next Steps Making Experiences World-class
  • What You Can Do to Create World-Class User Experiences Become Familiar with the Literature  Design For the Digital Age – Kim Goodwin  Don’t Make Me Think! – Steve Krug  GUI Bloopers – Jeff Johnson  Sketching User Experiences – Bill Buxton  User Interface Engineering UIE - https://www.uie.com/  Nielsen/Norman Group - http://www.nngroup.com/  Adaptive Path - http://www.adaptivepath.com/ Join a Community  The SIGCHI of the ACM - http://old.sigchi.org/local-sigs/  User Experience Professionals Association – UXPA - https://uxpa.org/  Interaction Design Association – IxDA - http://www.ixda.org/
  • What You Can Do to Create World-Class User Experiences Identify UX gaps  Perform a UX risk analysis – how many people are impacted how seriously by an experience?  Baseline the usability of the experience – what are users saying about it?  Inventory your UX skills and resources – who is willing and able to help? Visioning  What does World-class UX look like for the targeted project? Rev 0 Experience Roadmaps for your Service  How do we get from here to there?  identify links to / dependencies on other Services & Programs that can help or are impacted
  • Wrap-up For those working inside the enterprise, consumer experiences drive the value proposition for the experiences we create Cloud solutions change our operational model, but they don’t solve our experience problems World-class UX design addresses users, developers and business because it’s system design UX is not a checkbox or a buzz word – it is the thing our organization creates UX encompasses a broad set of skills, some of which you and your organization already likely have
  • Questions
  • @