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Verbs Illustrated

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Here are a few sample handmade responses from the second time students in this advanced English course on grammar have used handmade responses for drawing their responses to a reading assignment. In …

Here are a few sample handmade responses from the second time students in this advanced English course on grammar have used handmade responses for drawing their responses to a reading assignment. In this case, chapter 3 of Constance Hale's Sin and Syntax on verbs.

The purpose of the handmade response is to promote reading engagement so that students will be prepared for class discussion of the assigned reading for the day.

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  • 1. Sample Handmade Responses to Hale’s Sin and Syntax, Chapter 3: Verbs with corresponding citations from the chapterAngelo State UniversityEnglish 4361: English GrammarDr. Laurence MusgroveDepartment of English and Modern LanguagesJanuary 24, 2013 www.theillustratedprofessor.com @lemusgro
  • 2. “But remember: static verbs lack punch. Dynamic verbs, on the other hand,grab you by the lapels” (56).
  • 3. “More than any other part of speech, it is the verb that determines whether awriter is a wimp or a wizard” (57).
  • 4. “More than any other part of speech, it is the verb that determines whether awriter is a wimp or a wizard” (57).
  • 5. “The active voice is strong, direct, muscular” (58).
  • 6. “Stasis certainly has its place – whether expressed by the infinitives in ‘to beor not to be’ or by less anxious ‘is and ‘tis.’ But remember: static verbs lackpunch. Dynamic verbs, on the other hand, grab you by the lapels” (56).
  • 7. “…the static verbs, which either express a state of being or quietly link starletnouns without demanding a lot of attention” (55).“Dynamic verbs, on the other hand, grab you by the lapels” (56).
  • 8. “Static verbs lack punch” (56).“The pros make strong nouns and dynamic verbs the heart of their style” (57).
  • 9. “Static verbs lack punch” (56).
  • 10. “Verbs add drama to a random grouping of other words, producing an event,a happening, an exciting moment” (55).
  • 11. “Verbs subdivide into two major classes: Static and Dynamic” (55).“In a third, subordinate class, verbs gather around other verbs, acting as accomplicesto the action. These auxiliary or ‘helping’ verbs…are mere sidekicks” (56).
  • 12. “They *verbs+ also kick-start sentences: without them, words would simplycluster together in suspended animation, waiting for something to click” (55).
  • 13. “These auxiliary or ‘helping’ verbs….are mere sidekicks, symbioticallyattaching themselves to a main verb in a combo called a ‘verb phrase’” (56).
  • 14. “Stasis certainly has its place…But remember: static verbs lack punch” (56).“Using the imperative voice, he implores his reader to engage” (62).
  • 15. “The pros make strong nouns and dynamic verbs the heart of their style” (57).
  • 16. “Take a stand” (67).“Look out for verbs that convey less action than other words in thesentence, and avoid them” (68).
  • 17. “Avoid ‘being’ like the plague” (65).