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Student Examples of Handmade Thinking

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I introduce my students to 21 visual formats for capturing their responses to reading assignments. …

I introduce my students to 21 visual formats for capturing their responses to reading assignments.

The color images that follow were drawn by students in my literature and writing classes from fall 2009 through fall 2010.

They are in response to a variety of reading assignments, including MAUS, Scott McCloud’s Understanding Comics, John Gage’s The Shape of Reason, and selections from American Earth: Environmental Writing Since Thoreau and from The Oxford Book of American Short Stories.

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  • Here they are in five groups.
  • Portraits
  • From Speigelman’s MAUS I.
  • from SAND COUNTY ALMANAC by Aldo Leopold
  • Elmer Kelton’s THE TIME IT NEVER RAINED
  • Mary Karr’s CHERRY
  • Maps
  • From “The White Heron” by Sarah Orne Jewett
  • from THE END OF NATURE by Bill McKibben
  • Scott McCloud’s UNDERSTANDING COMICS
  • This a comic panel with two people in dialogue.
  • Scott McCloud’s UNDERSTANDING COMICS
  • Scott McCloud’s UNDERSTANDING COMICS
  • Comparison/contrast
  • Venn diagram
  • From “The White Heron” by Sarah Orne Jewett
  • “A Clean Well-Lighted Place” by Ernest Hemingway
  • “Heat” by Joyce Carol Oates
  • Seesaw
  • From “The White Heron” by Sarah Orne Jewett
  • Scales
  • “In a Far Country” by Jack London
  • Like a tree.
  • Speigelman’s MAUS I
  • Draft of Argument 1 in English 1302: Writing Across the Curriculum on Dan Roam’s THE BACK OF THE NAPKIN
  • The common web for brainstorming and mindmapping.
  • Bill McKibben’s Introduction to AMERICAN EARTH: ENVIRONMENTAL WRITING SINCE THOREAU
  • Thoreau’s JOURNALS
  • The organizational chart.
  • Which becomes a genealogical chart if you flip it.
  • Bar charts
  • from “The Population Bomb” by Paul Ehrlich
  • “A Clean Well-Lighted Place” by Ernest Hemingway
  • Pie charts
  • from “The Population Bomb” by Paul Ehrlich
  • And multivariable charts. Roam puts this in the “why?” category.
  • Timeline
  • “A Journey” by Edith Wharton
  • Speigelman’s MAUS I
  • Before and after. Also, could fit in the “pairs” category.
  • “Heat” by Joyce Carol Oates
  • Scott McCloud’s UNDERSTANDING COMICS
  • Speigelman’s MAUS I
  • The equation.
  • “Heat” by Joyce Carol Oates
  • A flow chart.
  • From SILENT SPRING by Rachel Carson
  • John Gage’s THE SHAPE OF ARGUMENT
  • Draft of Argument 1 in English 1302: Writing Across the Curriculum
  • John Gage’s THE SHAPE OF ARGUMENT
  • Freytag’s pyramid plot line
  • This is another multivariable chart or +/- plot line that shows progression up and down and left to right. I learned about this from my friend Austin Kleon who learned it from Kurt Vonnegut’s book Palm Sunday. I don’t know where Kurt Vonnegut learned it.
  • “A White Heron” by Sarah Orne Jewett
  • “A Journey” by Edith Wharton
  • “A Journey” by Edith Wharton
  • This image is sediment, layers moving from bottom to top.
  • from SAND COUNTY ALMANAC by Aldo Leopold
  • Here they are again.
  • Questions?
  • Transcript

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