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Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
Subjects and Predicates Illustrated
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Subjects and Predicates Illustrated

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Handmade responses to Sin And Syntax, chapter 9

Handmade responses to Sin And Syntax, chapter 9

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  • 1. Sample Handmade Responses to Hale’s Sin and Syntax, Chapter 9, Subjects and Predicates with corresponding citations from the chapterAngelo State UniversityEnglish 4361: English GrammarDr. Laurence MusgroveDepartment of English and Modern LanguagesFebruary 11, 2013 www.theillustratedprofessor.com @lemusgro
  • 2. “Sentence fragments may start with a capital letter and end with a period, butthese globs of words lack either a subject or, more often, a verb. They areshards of thought, shadows of ideas, shams in the prose department” (145).
  • 3. “Diagramming sentences also exposes a brutal truth about pileups of modifiers andphrases: they do not advance the message; they dangle off the hull of a sentence liketowlines. The more a sentence drags extraneous words and phrases, the more it slowsfrom schooner to barge” (139).
  • 4. “If subjects and predicates drift too far apart in sentences, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 5. “…*Modifiers and phrases+ do not advance the message; they dangle off thehull of a sentence like towlines. The more a sentence drags extraneous wordsand phrases, the more it slows from schooner to barge” (139).
  • 6. “A sentence brings words together into a stream of thought. It lets fragmentsflow together and become complete ideas. It has direction, a current,momentum” (128).
  • 7. “If the subject and predicate drift too far apart in sentences, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 8. “Tame savage sentences, combing through them until every hair is in place.Then muss them up and see how you like the look” (131).
  • 9. “Without a verb, a group of words can never hop to be anything more than afragment” (137).
  • 10. “If subjects and predicates drift too far apart in a sentence, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 11. “Consider the sentence a story, a mini-narrative, a yarn, with a beginning and anending and a dramatic arc” (129).
  • 12. “Julius Caesar showed unity of thought and expressed himself in the most directway possible. Like Caesar, you should put your faith in the sentence’s barebones: subject and predicate” (137).
  • 13. “The predicate, in short, is everything that is not the subject” (137).
  • 14. “The verb is the heart throb of a sentence” (137).
  • 15. “Subjects and predicates—especially if they’re not strong—can get lost in amass of fluffy words” (144).

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