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Subjects and Predicates Illustrated

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Handmade responses to Sin And Syntax, chapter 9

Handmade responses to Sin And Syntax, chapter 9

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  • 1. Sample Handmade Responses to Hale’s Sin and Syntax, Chapter 9, Subjects and Predicates with corresponding citations from the chapterAngelo State UniversityEnglish 4361: English GrammarDr. Laurence MusgroveDepartment of English and Modern LanguagesFebruary 11, 2013 www.theillustratedprofessor.com @lemusgro
  • 2. “Sentence fragments may start with a capital letter and end with a period, butthese globs of words lack either a subject or, more often, a verb. They areshards of thought, shadows of ideas, shams in the prose department” (145).
  • 3. “Diagramming sentences also exposes a brutal truth about pileups of modifiers andphrases: they do not advance the message; they dangle off the hull of a sentence liketowlines. The more a sentence drags extraneous words and phrases, the more it slowsfrom schooner to barge” (139).
  • 4. “If subjects and predicates drift too far apart in sentences, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 5. “…*Modifiers and phrases+ do not advance the message; they dangle off thehull of a sentence like towlines. The more a sentence drags extraneous wordsand phrases, the more it slows from schooner to barge” (139).
  • 6. “A sentence brings words together into a stream of thought. It lets fragmentsflow together and become complete ideas. It has direction, a current,momentum” (128).
  • 7. “If the subject and predicate drift too far apart in sentences, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 8. “Tame savage sentences, combing through them until every hair is in place.Then muss them up and see how you like the look” (131).
  • 9. “Without a verb, a group of words can never hop to be anything more than afragment” (137).
  • 10. “If subjects and predicates drift too far apart in a sentence, separated byendless intervening clauses, the reader may give up” (146).
  • 11. “Consider the sentence a story, a mini-narrative, a yarn, with a beginning and anending and a dramatic arc” (129).
  • 12. “Julius Caesar showed unity of thought and expressed himself in the most directway possible. Like Caesar, you should put your faith in the sentence’s barebones: subject and predicate” (137).
  • 13. “The predicate, in short, is everything that is not the subject” (137).
  • 14. “The verb is the heart throb of a sentence” (137).
  • 15. “Subjects and predicates—especially if they’re not strong—can get lost in amass of fluffy words” (144).

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