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Pronouns Illustrated

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  • 1. Sample Handmade Responses to Hale’s Sin and Syntax, Chapter 2: Pronouns with corresponding citations from the chapterAngelo State UniversityEnglish 4361: English GrammarDr. Laurence MusgroveDepartment of English and Modern LanguagesJanuary 22, 2013 www.theillustratedprofessor.com @lemusgro
  • 2. “Unlike nouns, a class of words that is forever morphing and mutating, the listof pronouns is finite and predictable, subdividing neatly and changed onlyslightly since the days of Shakespeare” (32).
  • 3. “Unlike nouns, a class of words that is forever morphing and mutating, the listof pronouns is finite and predictable, subdividing neatly and changed onlyslightly since the days of Shakespeare” (32).
  • 4. “Unlike nouns, a class of words that is forever morphing and mutating, the listof pronouns is finite and predictable, subdividing neatly and changed onlyslightly since the days of Shakespeare” (32).
  • 5. “Unlike nouns, a class of words that is forever morphing and mutating, the listof pronouns is finite and predictable, subdividing neatly and changed onlyslightly since the days of Shakespeare” (32).
  • 6. “Pronouns are proxies for nouns. They stand in willingly when nouns don’twant to hang around sounding repetitive” (32).
  • 7. “Pronouns are proxies for nouns. They stand in willingly when nouns don’twant to hang around sounding repetitive” (32).
  • 8. “Pronouns are proxies for nouns. They stand in willingly when nouns don’twant to hang around sounding repetitive” (32).
  • 9. “Expletive pronouns (it, there) are less sexy than they sound, stepping into asentence as subject when the juice of the sentence lurks in the predicate..”(33).
  • 10. “’Jim and myself, however, were holding out for June’ is hardly a studlysentence; June would prefer ‘Jim and I’” (34).
  • 11. “Possessive pronouns are all apostrophe-less: my, your, his, her, its. Who’sand it’s are contractions of who is and it is. Learn this or die” (52).
  • 12. “Your biggest problems with pronouns will come if you lose sight of theantecedent: when a pronoun drifts away from its antecedent, the entiremeaning gets lost at sea” (44).
  • 13. “Your biggest problems with pronouns will come if you lose sight of theantecedent: when a pronoun drifts away from its antecedent, the entiremeaning gets lost at sea” (44).
  • 14. “Your biggest problems with pronouns will come if you lose sight of theantecedent: when a pronoun drifts away from its antecedent, the entiremeaning gets lost at sea” (44).
  • 15. “Your biggest problems with pronouns will come if you lose sight of theantecedent: when a pronoun drifts away from its antecedent, the entiremeaning gets lost at sea” (44).