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English 4361 syllabus spring 2013  musgrove
 

English 4361 syllabus spring 2013 musgrove

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English Grammar Syllabus ENG 4361 Angelo State University

English Grammar Syllabus ENG 4361 Angelo State University

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    English 4361 syllabus spring 2013  musgrove English 4361 syllabus spring 2013 musgrove Document Transcript

    • English 4361: English Grammar Tuesdays and Thursdays 8:00-9:15am A005 Dr. Laurence Musgrove Office: A010 Email: lmusgrove@angelo.eduGraduate Requirement for all English Majors: All undergraduate English majors are required to complete a portfolio forgraduation. Portfolios should be submitted after finishing all requirements for the major or during a student’s lastsemester. See Department website link “Assessment” for further information.Course Description – English 4361 English Grammar (3-0). A study of grammar, including grammatical forms andfunctions, sentence structure, and diagramming.English 4361 Learning Outcomes - More specifically, upon completing the course, you should be able to identify and perform various sentence elements and strategies, know generally accepted methods for teaching sentence elements and strategies, know how to analyze short texts according to sentence elements and strategies, develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field, develop creative capacities through writing, develop skill in expressing oneself orally or in writing.Required Texts - Four texts in the editions listed are required by this class. You should bring the text(s) under discussionto class each day. 1. Sin and Syntax, Constance Hale, Three Rivers Press 2. It was the best of sentences, it was the worst of sentences, June Casagrande, Ten Speed Press 3. Sister Bernadette’s Barking Dog, Florey, Harvest Books 4. Owls and Other Fantasies, Oliver, Beacon PressFinal Grade Calculation - Your course grade will be based entirely upon the completed and graded assignments that yousubmit at the end of the term. Therefore, it is imperative that you find a method for storing and securing work that hasbeen graded and returned to you. These ingredients and their point values are listed below. You will find a descriptionof each ingredient below as well. POINTS POINTSASSIGNMENTS FACTOR TOTAL POSSIBLE EARNEDHistory of Grammar and Me 100 10Thursday Grammar Exams 100 10Midterm Grammar Exam 100 20Handmade Responses – Best 20 100 10My Original Grammar Handbook 100 20The New History of Grammar and Me 100 10Final Grammar Exam 100 20Total 100Divide Total by 100 =Final Grade 1
    • GRADE CONVERSION CHART Letter Numerical Grade Grade Equivalent Ranges A 97 93-100 B 87 84-92 C 77 74-83 D 67 64-73 F 57 0-63SOME OTHER ISSUESAbsences – The work conducted in class is vital to success in this course. Absences of any kind equivalent to six daysclasses will result in failure. If you must miss a class, contact a classmate to get the homework assignment for you or toturn in your work. Late work will not be accepted under any circumstances. I do not accept work via email. Allassignments must be submitted to receive a passing grade. No incompletes will be given.Personal Emergencies – Given my experience, I know that sometimes things fall apart. If you encounter a personaltragedy or some emotional distress that causes you to miss classes, get in touch with me as soon as you can. I don’t needall of the details, but at least I’ll know you haven’t dropped the class or been eaten by a bear.Student Athletes and Absences – If you are a student athlete, you will need to provide me with a schedule of classes thatyou will miss due to University-sanctioned sporting events.Academic Honesty - All work composed for this class must be written exclusively for this class and be your original work.You may of course receive assistance on your writing, but submitting someone else’s work as your own or failing toacknowledge sources appropriately will be grounds for plagiarism. Violations of academic honesty and plagiarism willresult in failure. Students are responsible for understanding the Academic Honor Code, which is available on the web athttp://www.angelo.edu/forms/pdf/honorcode5.pdf.Special Requirements: Persons with disabilities that may warrant academic accommodations must contact the StudentLife Office, Room 112 University Center, in order to request such accommodations prior to any being implemented. Youare encouraged to make this request early in the semester so that appropriate arrangements can be made.MORE ON ASSIGNMENTSHistory of Grammar and MeA narrative of 500 words or more in which students tell their histories as students and writers with an emphasis on theirrelationships with sentence grammar and correctness.Thursday Grammar ExamsBrief grammar exams in which students identify grammatical terms as well as perform sentence strategies.Midterm ExamA midterm grammar exam in which students identify grammatical terms as well as perform sentence strategies.Handmade ResponsesHandmade responses are responses to reading assignments. In your handmade response to the assigned reading, draw apicture on an 8.5 X 11 sheet of plain white paper that creatively and originally represents the author’s purpose or focus ofthe reading assignment.This picture should be a combination of images, words, and colors in the white space of the page. The drawing must bean original drawing, follow one or more of the twenty-one visual formats, and include no clip art. Whichever handmaderesponse format you select, your drawing should be presented in landscape format, be effectively developed, and includeat least three colors (black may be one of those colors). 2
    • On the reverse of the reading visual in the top left corner, write your name, the date, the name of the readingassignment, and the name of visual format(s) you are using. Also on the reverse, include at least one brief citation fromthe assigned text (along with the parenthetical page reference) that corresponds to your drawing. Evaluation Criteria for Handmade Responses 5 points: Excellent representation of the author’s purpose or focus, including creative and effective balance of images, words, and color; excellent and effective idea development; as well as correct citation and page reference; no errors in sentence, spelling, and usage; adherence to page format for reading response visuals. 4 points: Good representation of the author’s purpose or focus, including creative and effective balance of images, words, and color; good and effective idea development; as well as correct citation and page reference; no errors in sentence, spelling, and usage; adherence to page format for reading response visuals. 3 points: Same as 4 but with incorrect format for citation, page reference, or page format; or more than two errors in sentence, spelling, and usage. 1 point: Perfunctory visual response; frequent errors in sentence, spelling, and usage; failure to include adequate idea development or citation, or to adhere to page format of reading response visuals. 21 Visual Formats for Handmade Responses 3
    • My Original Grammar Handbook Minimum Requirements A project composed of images, words, color and other visual materials that creatively re-imagines the traditional sentence grammar handbook. Your handbook should include entries for at least the following grammatical terms in whatever order you think appropriate. As is conventional in handbooks, each term should include a definition and examples that appropriately demonstrate its use. In addition to these contents, the handbook should also include a cover, a title page, a table of contents with corresponding page numbers, and an introduction. Words Sentences  Grammar  The Subject  Usage  The Predicate  Nouns  Phrases  Pronouns o Introductory  Verbs o Prepositional  Articles o Appositive  Adjectives o Participial  Adverbs o Absolute  Prepositions  Clauses  Conjunctions o Relative o Coordination o Adverb o Subordination  Simple Sentences  Interjections  Simple Sentences with Introductory Phrases  Compound Sentences  Run-Ons and Comma Splices  Complex Sentences  Semi-colon  Compound-Complex Sentences  Fragments Evaluation Criteria for My Original Grammar Handbook A: Exceeds minimum requirements of assignment with virtually no errors in definitions, examples, and presentation. B: Fulfills minimum requirements of assignment with virtually no errors in definitions, examples, and presentation. C: Fulfills minimum requirements of assignment with unnecessary errors in definitions, examples, and presentation. D: Fails to fulfill minimum requirements of assignment.The New History of Grammar and MeAn essay of 1000 words or more in which students review the first essays they wrote for this class and then describe theways in which this course has affected their relationships with sentence grammar and correctness.Final ExamA grammar exam in which students identify grammatical terms as well as perform sentence strategies. 4
    • Name ____________________ Narrative Evaluation Criteria an implicit yet emotionally clear and appropriate focus rich, lively, and original detail, including dialogue appropriate for purpose narrative logic (plot, conflict, turning point) clearly flows from one episode to the next transitions and paragraphing are clearly supportive of organization A a tone appropriate to the aim of the essay stylistic concision, maturity and confident facility with language as demonstrated by strong transitions, sentence variety, figurative language, and appropriate word choice virtually free of surface and usage errors an implicit yet emotionally clear and appropriate focus rich and lively detail, including dialogue appropriate for purpose narrative logic flows from one episode to the next B transitions and paragraphing are clearly supportive of organization a tone appropriate to the aim of the essay lacks the stylistic concision, maturity, transitions, and facility with language of an A essay largely free of surface and usage errors unnecessary moralizing in introduction or conclusion unnecessary meta-discourse signaling in introduction and transitions detail and dialogue may at times be clichéd or perfunctory narrative logic is flawed C occasional organizational and developmental weakness a tone appropriate to the aim of the essay lack of sentence concision, variety, facility with language, and word choice expected in upper-division English course a pattern or two of surface and usage errors unnecessary moralizing in introduction or conclusion unnecessary meta-discourse signaling in introduction and transitions detail and dialogue is clichéd or perfunctory narrative logic is flawed D obvious organizational and developmental weakness a tone inappropriate to the aim of the assignment and audience lack of sentence variety, facility with language, and word choice expected in upper-division English course unnecessary errors in sentence, spelling, and usage demonstrating failure to proofread unnecessary moralizing in introduction or conclusion unnecessary meta-discourse signaling in introduction and transitions detail and dialogue is clichéd or perfunctory narrative logic is flawed F occasional organizational and developmental weakness a tone appropriate to the aim of the essay lack of sentence variety, facility with language, and word choice unnecessary errors in sentence, spelling, and usage demonstrating failure to proofread Projects receiving no grade will fail to address the topic or assignment,No evaluation fail to fulfill other requirements of the assignment, or show evidence of plagiarism.Comments 5
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    • Creating Titles1. Copy out of your draft a sentence that could serve as a title.2. Write a title that is a question beginning with What, Who, When, or Where. (Where Do Titles Come From?)3. Write a title that is a question beginning with How or Why. (Why Are Titles Necessary?)4. Write a title that is a question beginning with Is/Are, Do/Does, or Will. (Are Some Titles Better Than Others?)5. Pick out of the draft some concrete image – something the reader can hear, see, taste, smell, or feel – to use as a title.6. Pick another concrete image out of the draft. Look for an image that is a bit unusual or surprising.7. Writing a title that begins with an –ing verb (Creating a Good Title).8. Writing a title beginning with On (On Creating Good Titles).9. Write a title that is a lie about the draft. (You probably won’t use this one, but it might stimulate your thinking.)10. Write a one-word title – the most obvious one possible.11. Write a less obvious one-word title.12. Think of a familiar saying, or the title of a book, song, or movie, that might fit your draft.13. Take the title you just wrote and twist it by changing a word or creating a pun on it.14. Find two titles you’ve written so far that you might use together in a double title. Join them together with a colon.from “Twenty Titles for the Writer” by Richard Leahy, College Composition and Communication, Vol. 43, No. 4, December1992 7
    • Tentative Schedule Tuesday Thursday Week 1 1/15 1/17In-Class Activities Introductions Basic Vocabulary of Sentences Reading Due Hale: Foreword, Introduction, Chapter 1 Writing Due GRAMMAR DIAGNOSTIC ACADEMIC PERFORMANCE AGREEMENT DUE Week 2 1/22 1/24In-Class Activities Eight Basic Sentence Strategies Simple Sentences Reading Due Hale: Chapter 2 Hale: Chapter 3 Writing Due “HISTORY OF GRAMMAR AND ME” DUE Week 3 1/29 1/31In-Class Activities Compound Sentences Compound Sentences with Semi-Colons Reading Due Hale: Chapters 4-5 Hale: Chapter 6 Week 4 2/5 2/7In-Class Activities Subordinate Clauses Complex Sentences with Adverb Clauses Reading Due Hale: Chapters 7-8 Hale: Chapter 9 Week 5 2/12 2/14In-Class Activities Sentence-Combining Exercise 1 Sentence-Combining Exercise 2 Reading Due Hale: Chapter 10 Hale: Chapter 11 Week 6 2/19 2/21In-Class Activities Sentence-Combining Exercise 3 Compound-Complex Sentences Reading Due Hale: Chapter 12 Casagrande: Introduction and Chapter 1 Week 7 2/26 2/28In-Class Activities Sentence-Combining Exercise 4 Sentence Unscrambling Exercise 1 Reading Due Casagrande: Chapters 2-4 Casagrande: Chapters 5-7 Week 8 3/5 3/7In-Class Activities Sentence Unscrambling Exercise 2 Reading Due Casagrande: Chapters 8-10 MIDTERM EXAM Week 9 3/12 3/14 BREAK NO CLASSES NO CLASSES Week 10 3/19 3/21In-Class Activities Effective Intentional Fragment Editing Unpunctuated Paragraph 1 Reading Due Casagrande: Chapters 11-13 Casagrande: Chapters 14-16 Week 11 3/26 3/28In-Class Activities Editing Unpunctuated Paragraph 2 Complex Sentences with Adjective Clauses Reading Due Casagrande: Chapters 17-19 Casagrande: Chapters 20-21 Week 12 4/2 4/4In-Class Activities Sentence-Combining Exercise 5 Complex Sentences with Noun Clauses Reading Due Florey: Chapter 1 Florey: Chapter 2 Week 13 4/9 4/11In-Class Activities Four Basic Modifying Phrases Appositive Phrases Reading Due Florey: Chapter 3 Florey: Chapter 4 Week 14 4/16 4/18In-Class Activities Participial Phrases Reading Due Florey: Chapter 5 Writing Due MY ORIGINAL GRAMMAR HANDBOOK DUE Week 15 4/23 4/25In-Class Activities Absolute Phrases Adjectives Out-of-Order Reading Due Florey: Chapter 6 Florey: Chapter 7 Week 16 4/30 5/2In-Class Activities Editing Unpunctuated Paragraph 3 REVIEW Reading Due Week 17 5/7 5/9 FINALS WEEK “THE NEW HISTORY OF GRAMMAR AND ME” DUE AND FINAL EXAM @ 8am 8
    • Academic Performance Agreement English 4361 MusgroveIn order to make the requirements of this class and your responsibilities as a student as clear as possible, I’ve created thisdocument titled “Academic Performance Agreement.” Please read this information carefully because it outlines the kindsof behaviors, study habits, and attitudes necessary for success in this class, as well as in the University community atlarge. If you agree to the terms and conditions set forth below, please sign your name and provide me a copy. By signingand returning this agreement to me, you commit yourself to the standards of conduct and academic performance listedbelow. 1. I understand that attendance is a requirement of the class and that 6 absences of any sort will result in automatic failure. I also understand that if I miss class that I should contact another student to discover what I’ve missed. 2. If I miss more than one class in sequence, I will contact the professor to let him know the reasons for my absences. 3. I understand that arriving late to class is inappropriate because it disrupts the class. I understand that the instructor will shut the door to the classroom when the class starts and that I will not attempt to enter the class after the door has been closed. 4. I understand that cell phones must be turned off before entering class. I understand if my cell phone rings during class I will be asked to leave the class. 5. I understand that laptops are to be shut down when the class begins. 6. I understand that this class has substantial reading and writing requirements. These requirements will demand that I manage my time carefully and schedule at least 6 hours of study time per week or 2 hours of study time for every one hour of scheduled class time. 7. I understand that I should be prepared each day to bring the text under discussion with me to class. 8. I understand that I should be prepared each day to share my responses to the reading assignments in class. 9. I understand that I will be required to contribute to class discussions and small group work in class. In other words, I will be required to speak in class, share my ideas, and respect the ideas of others. 10. I understand that any writing I submit must be my own and written exclusively for this class. 11. I understand that when I use the ideas of others in my writing that I must let my readers know whose ideas are whose and where I found them. I understand that plagiarism (or the failure to acknowledge the ideas of others appropriately) is a form of academic dishonesty and will result in failure. 12. I understand that I will benefit from discussing my ideas and writing with my family, friends, and other students. I also understand that I can get help with my ideas and writing in the Writing Center. However, I also understand that I should never claim someone else’s ideas or writing as my own. 13. I understand that I must adhere to the due dates for all writing assignments because late work will not be accepted or penalized, at the discretion of the instructor. 14. I understand that I should think of writing as a complex process of planning, drafting, revising, editing, and presentation. Consequently, I understand that I should schedule time to complete each of these tasks before submitting my work. 15. I understand that I can make an appointment with my instructor to talk about any aspect of the class, including course assignments, my writing, the required reading, extended absences or comments and grades on my writing.Student Signature _______________________________________Date _________________________ 9