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Bells Palsy Part 1

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g4 anatomy

g4 anatomy


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Transcript

  • 1. Bell’s Palsy By Lauren Viola, Andie Horan, David Na,
  • 2. What is Bell’s Palsy?
    • Temporary facial paralysis caused by damage to the 7 th cranial nerve (facial nerve)
    • Usually only one side of the face is affected and you have trouble closing your eye and producing tears, controlling drooling and movement of the mouth.
  • 3. Who discovered Bell’s Palsy?
    • Named for Sir Charles Bell, a 19 th century surgeon
  • 4. Signs and Symptoms
    • Facial droop and difficulty making facial expressions
    • Pain behind or in front of your ear on the affected side
    • Changes in the amount of tears or saliva your body produces
    • Tingling around lips or eye
  • 5. Signs and Symptoms
    • Headache
    • Loss of taste
    • Difficulty closing eye on affected side
    • Facial swellling
  • 6. How Long are You Affected?
    • Most people start to improve in a few weeks and completely recover in 3-6 months
    • Some people average of recovering is 6-8 weeks but continue to see symptoms and have reoccurrences throughout their life
  • 7. Who Does it Affect?
    • About 40,000 people in US are affected per year
    • Affects approximately 1 in 65 persons in a life time
    • More common in people of Japanese decent and young adults.
  • 8. Complications
    • Disfigurement from paralysis
    • Chronic Taste abnormalities
    • Spasm of eye and facial muscles
  • 9. Complications
    • Damage to eye or infection
      • Corneal ulcers- erosion or open sore in the outer layer of the cornea
    • Synkinesis -Involuntary movement accompanying a voluntary one
  • 10. Cause of the Bell’s palsy
    • Inflamation that causes pressure on the Facial Nerve, which effect the Facial Muscles.