Collaborative Writing and Critique
Using Wikis Wikis are a great way to create a shared resource that contain either a single document or an entire network o...
Creating A Single Document If your goal is to create a single document, rather than a network of documents, there are two ...
Using Google Docs <ul><li>Google Docs, and a host of other associated applications, is a great place to do document creati...
Responding to Students <ul><li>By using shared documents and then adding your feedback to the document, you have the oppor...
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Collaborative Writing And Critique

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An introduction to collaborative writing tools for educators.

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Collaborative Writing And Critique

  1. 1. Collaborative Writing and Critique
  2. 2. Using Wikis Wikis are a great way to create a shared resource that contain either a single document or an entire network of documents. For teacher collaboration, they can be used to gather information that is used by a grade level, course, or building team for a specific project. For student collaboration, they can be used as a platform for collecting and sharing student work. Use the links at the right to see short videos on wiki basics and how to create a wiki.
  3. 3. Creating A Single Document If your goal is to create a single document, rather than a network of documents, there are two tools that are useful for this purpose. The ETHERPAD is a really quick and easy tool that opens a window that you can invite people to edit and which has a simultaneous chat window so you can talk about the document as you edit it. Etherpad is being purchased by Google and is likely to end up in the Google Wave product, but until then it is still available. Another tool that is useful for editing a single document is Google Docs. With this tool you can create a document and share it with other users. The differences between Google Docs and Etherpad are that with Google Docs you have to sign in and there is no integrated chat function (yet). Info about using Google Docs in on the next slide. 
  4. 4. Using Google Docs <ul><li>Google Docs, and a host of other associated applications, is a great place to do document creation that can be collaborative and interactive. You can view and respond to student work, students can view and respond to student work, create portfolios, include other media, the possibilities are almost limitless. Click on the images for more info. </li></ul><ul><li>Start by looking at this visual representation of Google Apps. </li></ul><ul><li>Here’s a simple introduction to Google Docs. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Google Docs Community to see tutorial videos. Click on Favorites and Playlists to see suggested videos. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Link to a blog about google docs. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Link to a set of discussions. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>100 Google Doc Tips </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Responding to Students <ul><li>By using shared documents and then adding your feedback to the document, you have the opportunity to create an active dialogue with your students around their creative work. There are tools for responding to a wide range of types of student products, Google Docs is just one way to respond to written work. Using Google Docs or a similar tool you can… </li></ul><ul><li>Support student to student feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>Have an automated digital record of document revisions. </li></ul><ul><li>Provide faster and more detailed feedback to students. </li></ul><ul><li>Support a student portfolio of work showing long term growth. </li></ul>

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