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Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas
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Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study - Ecotourism in Protected areas

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Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study, NSW, Australia

Yuraygir Coastal Walk Case Study, NSW, Australia

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  • Hands up who knows about the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife. Which was the first national park in the world Yellowstone (1872) or Australia’s Royal National Park (1894)? Thomas Lancelot Lewis as NSW Minister for Lands visited the US and he liked their parks service so much that in 1967 he founded the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, complete with ranger uniforms and hats. In the US the parks service was partnered by a newly formed private charity, the National Parks Foundation. Founded by first lady, Lady Bird Johnson and philanthropist Laurance Rockefeller, the Foundation raised funds from businesses and philanthropists to support the parks for future generations of Americans. Tom decided he would have one of those too, so, in 1969, he tapped on the shoulders of corporate Australians (mates from his mining ministry days) to form the National Parks Foundation of NSW. This must have made him pretty popular, as he was upgraded to Minister for Tourism and from there (note the career path!!) became NSW’s 33 rd premier in 1975. But his popularity did not stop there, on his departure from parliament in 1978 was allowed to continue to use the honorific of The Honourable Tom Lewis, in 2000 he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia "For service to the Parliament of New South Wales, to the environment as the founder of the National Parks and Wildlife Service of New South Wales, and to the community“ In 2001 he was awarded the Centenary Medal. In 2002, with national parks in every state of Australia, the Foundation adopted a national charter to raise funds and awareness for the benefit of the natural and cultural heritage of Australia.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • Since 1970 the Foundation grows its environmental legacy for the Australian people, firstly by purchasing land for conservation. With the help of our passionate supporters, we has acquired over 500,000 hectares of land for national parks. Our first purchase was Sturt National Park to save the red kangaroos. As it turned out they did not require saving but our next purchases out west were needed to secure habitat for threatened species, Coturandee Nature Reserve, the last remaining home of the YFRW in NSW and Yathong Nature Reserve & Mallee Cliffs National Park, home of the malleefowl. It was the early days of taking a scientific approach to recovering threatened species and some of first forays into funding recovery projects whilst not successful, did lead systematically to the eventual recovery of these outback species as well as the Lord Howe Island Woodhen and Goulds Petrel from the brink of extinction. Another western purchase was Mungo Station with its wealth of archaeological treasures that confirm the Aboriginal culture as the oldest living culture on earth and is the focus of our current project to build a new visitor centre at Mungo designed by Glenn Murcutt. Conservation of 10 cultural heritage sites – Fort Denison Community education programs encouraging the public to appreciate and enjoy nature and heritage – Discovery, BYB Including tracks, trails, viewing platforms, interpretive signage, visitor centres, displays, guides and poetry books.
  • And so with our case study today, it started with the 1974 purchase by the Foundation of 3305 ha of coast to form Angourie NP which is about 10% of what is now known as Yuraygir National Park (35,502 ha), at 65km, the longest stretch of protected coastline in NSW. Australia is known internationally for its beaches and while Bondi is nice, there is a sweeping beauty in our wild beaches framed by rocky headlands and the subtle shades and textures of the Aussie bush. Completed last year, the Yuraygir Coastal Walk traverses the traditional lands of the Gumbaingirr and Yaegl people, offers a diverse cross-section of natural beauty in its rocky headlands, sweeping beaches and a range of natural environments forests, heaths, swamps, lagoons and lakes with a plethora of native flora and fauna. This country is home to the endangered coastal emu, whose tracks mark the way for walkers. The offshore Solitary Islands Marine Park is washed by warm tropical waters while the coast is lapped by cool southern currents. This results in a large mixture of marine species; fish, reptiles, birds and mammals.
  • Visitors are inspired to tackle part or all of the walk, be it a half day walk or 4 days, a drive to a lookout or hiking between camping grounds. The walk starts at the coastal village of Angourie and ends at Red Rock, passing through the peaceful townships of Brooms Head, Minnie Water and Wooli. Walking tracks are well-defined and signposted to minimise impacts on the surrounding park, utilising beaches, rocks and employing boardwalks and stairs for erosion control and safety. Beaches, lagoons and lakes cater for fishing, swimming, canoeing and kayaking. The beauty of the coast provides many photographic opportunities. The coastal gateway towns offer visitors suppliers, food and accommodation with holiday revenues providing a large proportion of annual income.
  • Interpretive signage, maps and brochures inform and inspire visitors to appreciate this beautiful environment and care for it, themselves and the native plants and animals they will encounter on the walk. By using the endangered coastal emu as the walk logo, visitors learn about the emu, why it is threatened, what it needs to survive and how they can help protect it from extinction. This promotes simple actions such as driving carefully in emu habitat, removing any rubbish and looking after the bushland and water sources. Tourism operators use these tools to educate their visitors and open their eyes to the wonder of nature around them. Park rangers offer guided whale watching tours that give insights into the biology and ecology of humpback whales. Commercial operators not only take away the trouble of logistics but show visitors how to enjoy nature while minimising their impacts.
  • In Yuraygir funds are raised through vehicle entry fees, camping fees, guided tours, tourism operator licences and philanthropy. The Yuraygir Coastal Walk, as a marketing program, has a leveraging effect, increasing tourism and thereby increasing the associated revenue streams which can then be channelled back into conservation management. Raised awareness also increases volunteerism for activities such as bush regeneration and campground hosts (get details from NPWS)
  • In the early 19 th century, this part of the coast was fairly isolated as the land was unsuited for agriculture. There was some commercial fishing and oyster farming but the land thankfully missed out on development and became a popular holiday destination for country folk from Grafton, seeking sun and sand and the peace and beauty of the coast. Long before that the coast was a popular camping and fishing spot for the local aboriginal people and many ceremonies took place in the surrounding area. There was even a special camping place where the women would come from the country to give birth to their children. They believe that the land nurtures us all, and so we must care for it. As Ecotourism promotes caring for the land, this shows respect for Aboriginal elders, past and present, and for their strong, and ongoing, spiritual and cultural connection to the country that nurtures us all and upon which we travel.
  • Freedom, there is certainly that. And the YCW provides comfort for travellers, and guides can help us experience the freedom of a nature walk. Australia is a safe country, a lucky country, but it wasn’t always that way and still has a way to going in supporting the rights of aboriginal people. Story told to Tony Perkins Garby elder, by his grandmother. M’grandmother, she was tellin’ me about the time she was looking after a baby somewhere between Blackadder’s Creek and Casson’s Creek. She said that these policemen come along on horses, all the men were there, and the women they were washin’ an’ that sort of thing, and she said they shot the men there. She reckoned that when they chased them they went down through to Red Rock and the men was swimmin’ across the river there, and she said up here where they started and down there, the water was red – just red – with the blood where they shot ‘em. She grabbed the baby and the women hid in the rushes on the creek banks. She told me that was the worst thing she ever seen that they just came along and started shootin’. The headland was named Red Rock because the river went red from their blood. A plaque has been placed as a memorial. But the larger memorial is the place itself and the storytelling. Ecotourism provides an opportunity to tell stories like these so people can learn about the bad things that happened so they can respect, and learn and listen to, those who were left behind. A step towards reconciliation. By protecting their country we show respect for those past and present on whose land we travel. It is a right of everyone to have a clean and healthy environment. Humans rely on biodiversity for food and medicine and to provide fresh air and clean water and for our places of natural beauty to refresh the spirit and feed our souls. The Foundation wants future generations of Australians, and the international community, to be able to appreciate the diversity and beauty of Australia’s landscapes and endemic species.
  • Through this project, the community has become closer and their environment respected and treasured. The Yuraygir Coastal Walk was jointly funded by NPWS, Clarence Valley Council and the supporters of the FNPW with input from local stakeholders. The project is ostensibly a tourism marketing product. The park, infrastructure, access roads and gateway towns were pre-existing. It was one of those “wouldn’t it be great if” visions long held by many land managers and put into practice using a partnership approach. $60,000 was spent on themed track markers, brochures, signage, z-cards and public relations. But it wasn’t just the money, it was people talking to people, sharing their stories of Yuraygir and wanting visitors to share them as well. If you were to list the many people who made this project come to fruition, you would find a very long list indeed of partners.
  • FNPW supported the Yuraygir Coastal Walk because of all of these good things that tourism can bring to conservation of our protected areas. It helps to tell the story of the land and its people, plants and animals. The Foundation has a Projects Committee who evaluates project proposals based on a set of criteria covering conservation significance, community awareness-raising and involvement, equity of access and sustainability. An ecotourism project such as the YCW ticks all these boxes. To achieve our objectives the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife partners with like-minded organisations across Australia. Our aim is to be the foremost philanthropic partner for protected areas in Australia. Our 41 year history as a mate to NPWS has produced a strategic partnership model that works so I thought we would share that with you. Along with our shared heritage we have a shared conservation goal and high standards of corporate governance, transparency and accountability to the public. NPWS has always had representation on the FNPW Board and good communication channels to enable sharing of vision, expertise and opportunities to take advantage of each organisation’s unique status. Like any good partnership we work at improving our outcomes and formalising our working processes. At the moment we have a MoU that provides a management framework for NPWS projects funded by FNPW and one that defines the relationship between the two organisations. This last one has been very interesting in opening our eyes for cooperative partner opportunities ranging from leveraging funds for land acquisition through the National Reserve System, promoting land donations for protected areas, administering co-funded grant programs, creating marketing collateral to the simple cross-promotion of newsletters. Recently we have “upped the ante” on our partnership by embarking on a highly significant large project to build a new visitor centre for Mungo National Park with the FNPW taking the lead role in scoping the project, undertaking stakeholder consultation and developing an architect’s brief. The next phase is the raising of capital funding of around $5.5million for the build. We are also giving time and effort to promoting our partnership, such as at this conference, to other like-minded organisations, conservation land managers, funders, philanthropists or indeed ecotourism operators who may be interested in getting together for mutual benefit.
  • FNPW supported the Yuraygir Coastal Walk because of all of these good things that tourism can bring to conservation of our protected areas. It helps to tell the story of the land and its people, plants and animals. The Foundation has a Projects Committee who evaluates project proposals based on a set of criteria covering conservation significance, community awareness-raising and involvement, equity of access and sustainability. An ecotourism project such as the YCW ticks all these boxes. To achieve our objectives the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife partners with like-minded organisations across Australia. Our aim is to be the foremost philanthropic partner for protected areas in Australia. Our 41 year history as a mate to NPWS has produced a strategic partnership model that works so I thought we would share that with you. Along with our shared heritage we have a shared conservation goal and high standards of corporate governance, transparency and accountability to the public. NPWS has always had representation on the FNPW Board and good communication channels to enable sharing of vision, expertise and opportunities to take advantage of each organisation’s unique status. Like any good partnership we work at improving our outcomes and formalising our working processes. At the moment we have a MoU that provides a management framework for NPWS projects funded by FNPW and one that defines the relationship between the two organisations. This last one has been very interesting in opening our eyes for cooperative partner opportunities ranging from leveraging funds for land acquisition through the National Reserve System, promoting land donations for protected areas, administering co-funded grant programs, creating marketing collateral to the simple cross-promotion of newsletters. Recently we have “upped the ante” on our partnership by embarking on a highly significant large project to build a new visitor centre for Mungo National Park with the FNPW taking the lead role in scoping the project, undertaking stakeholder consultation and developing an architect’s brief. The next phase is the raising of capital funding of around $5.5million for the build. We are also giving time and effort to promoting our partnership, such as at this conference, to other like-minded organisations, conservation land managers, funders, philanthropists or indeed ecotourism operators who may be interested in getting together for mutual benefit.
  • FNPW supported the Yuraygir Coastal Walk because of all of these good things that tourism can bring to conservation of our protected areas. It helps to tell the story of the land and its people, plants and animals. The Foundation has a Projects Committee who evaluates project proposals based on a set of criteria covering conservation significance, community awareness-raising and involvement, equity of access and sustainability. An ecotourism project such as the YCW ticks all these boxes. To achieve our objectives the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife partners with like-minded organisations across Australia. Our aim is to be the foremost philanthropic partner for protected areas in Australia. Our 41 year history as a mate to NPWS has produced a strategic partnership model that works so I thought we would share that with you. Along with our shared heritage we have a shared conservation goal and high standards of corporate governance, transparency and accountability to the public. NPWS has always had representation on the FNPW Board and good communication channels to enable sharing of vision, expertise and opportunities to take advantage of each organisation’s unique status. Like any good partnership we work at improving our outcomes and formalising our working processes. At the moment we have a MoU that provides a management framework for NPWS projects funded by FNPW and one that defines the relationship between the two organisations. This last one has been very interesting in opening our eyes for cooperative partner opportunities ranging from leveraging funds for land acquisition through the National Reserve System, promoting land donations for protected areas, administering co-funded grant programs, creating marketing collateral to the simple cross-promotion of newsletters. Recently we have “upped the ante” on our partnership by embarking on a highly significant large project to build a new visitor centre for Mungo National Park with the FNPW taking the lead role in scoping the project, undertaking stakeholder consultation and developing an architect’s brief. The next phase is the raising of capital funding of around $5.5million for the build. We are also giving time and effort to promoting our partnership, such as at this conference, to other like-minded organisations, conservation land managers, funders, philanthropists or indeed ecotourism operators who may be interested in getting together for mutual benefit.
  • In 2002 the Foundation spread its giving to other states of Australia granting funds to universities and a range of conservation land managers. As well as granting funds for projects we provide a safe avenue through which others can give to our cause, be it companies seeking to sponsor projects, individuals looking for a way to save a species or ecotourism operators seeking to support the land that provides the backdrop for their business. Q Station is a hotel and conference centre in Sydney Harbour National Park at North Head’s historic Quarantine Station. Extensive restoration works were carried out by the lessees on the historic buildings aided by a $775K grant from a philanthropic supporter to FNPW. At the hotel a small toy frog is left on the guest’s pillow with a card promoting the conservation activities of the hotel and inviting the guest to keep the frog for a cost of $3 added to their bill. Funds raised are being used to provide opportunities for underprivileged primary school children to go on an excursion to a national park. Maximum Adventure runs events in national parks, including a mountain bike race in Dharawal NP. They donate a portion of the entry fees to FNPW for projects that enhance visitor facilities in the park such as providing water tanks in remote picnic & camping areas and restoration of historic roads and bridges on the Old North Road. Leisure Solutions offers ecotourism holidays in Australia incorporating visits to protected areas. They support FNPW through a “clip the ticket” donation for every package sold and use the association with FNPW to gain market share. Only last week on Gruen Planet they cited that people were prepared to pay up to 25% more for a product that “does good”. Leisure Solutions is funding a search for disappearing eastern quolls in Tasmania.
  • In 2002 the Foundation spread its giving to other states of Australia granting funds to universities and a range of conservation land managers. As well as granting funds for projects we provide a safe avenue through which others can give to our cause, be it companies seeking to sponsor projects, individuals looking for a way to save a species or ecotourism operators seeking to support the land that provides the backdrop for their business. Q Station is a hotel and conference centre in Sydney Harbour National Park at North Head’s historic Quarantine Station. Extensive restoration works were carried out by the lessees on the historic buildings aided by a $775K grant from a philanthropic supporter to FNPW. At the hotel a small toy frog is left on the guest’s pillow with a card promoting the conservation activities of the hotel and inviting the guest to keep the frog for a cost of $3 added to their bill. Funds raised are being used to provide opportunities for underprivileged primary school children to go on an excursion to a national park. Maximum Adventure runs events in national parks, including a mountain bike race in Dharawal NP. They donate a portion of the entry fees to FNPW for projects that enhance visitor facilities in the park such as providing water tanks in remote picnic & camping areas and restoration of historic roads and bridges on the Old North Road. Leisure Solutions offers ecotourism holidays in Australia incorporating visits to protected areas. They support FNPW through a “clip the ticket” donation for every package sold and use the association with FNPW to gain market share. Only last week on Gruen Planet they cited that people were prepared to pay up to 25% more for a product that “does good”. Leisure Solutions is funding a search for disappearing eastern quolls in Tasmania.
  • In 2002 the Foundation spread its giving to other states of Australia granting funds to universities and a range of conservation land managers. As well as granting funds for projects we provide a safe avenue through which others can give to our cause, be it companies seeking to sponsor projects, individuals looking for a way to save a species or ecotourism operators seeking to support the land that provides the backdrop for their business. Q Station is a hotel and conference centre in Sydney Harbour National Park at North Head’s historic Quarantine Station. Extensive restoration works were carried out by the lessees on the historic buildings aided by a $775K grant from a philanthropic supporter to FNPW. At the hotel a small toy frog is left on the guest’s pillow with a card promoting the conservation activities of the hotel and inviting the guest to keep the frog for a cost of $3 added to their bill. Funds raised are being used to provide opportunities for underprivileged primary school children to go on an excursion to a national park. Maximum Adventure runs events in national parks, including a mountain bike race in Dharawal NP. They donate a portion of the entry fees to FNPW for projects that enhance visitor facilities in the park such as providing water tanks in remote picnic & camping areas and restoration of historic roads and bridges on the Old North Road. Leisure Solutions offers ecotourism holidays in Australia incorporating visits to protected areas. They support FNPW through a “clip the ticket” donation for every package sold and use the association with FNPW to gain market share. Only last week on Gruen Planet they cited that people were prepared to pay up to 25% more for a product that “does good”. Leisure Solutions is funding a search for disappearing eastern quolls in Tasmania.
  • FNPW supported the Yuraygir Coastal Walk because of all of these good things that tourism can bring to conservation of our protected areas. It helps to tell the story of the land and its people, plants and animals. The Foundation has a Projects Committee who evaluates project proposals based on a set of criteria covering conservation significance, community awareness-raising and involvement, equity of access and sustainability. An ecotourism project such as the YCW ticks all these boxes. To achieve our objectives the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife partners with like-minded organisations across Australia. Our aim is to be the foremost philanthropic partner for protected areas in Australia. Our 41 year history as a mate to NPWS has produced a strategic partnership model that works so I thought we would share that with you. Along with our shared heritage we have a shared conservation goal and high standards of corporate governance, transparency and accountability to the public. NPWS has always had representation on the FNPW Board and good communication channels to enable sharing of vision, expertise and opportunities to take advantage of each organisation’s unique status. Like any good partnership we work at improving our outcomes and formalising our working processes. At the moment we have a MoU that provides a management framework for NPWS projects funded by FNPW and one that defines the relationship between the two organisations. This last one has been very interesting in opening our eyes for cooperative partner opportunities ranging from leveraging funds for land acquisition through the National Reserve System, promoting land donations for protected areas, administering co-funded grant programs, creating marketing collateral to the simple cross-promotion of newsletters. Recently we have “upped the ante” on our partnership by embarking on a highly significant large project to build a new visitor centre for Mungo National Park with the FNPW taking the lead role in scoping the project, undertaking stakeholder consultation and developing an architect’s brief. The next phase is the raising of capital funding of around $5.5million for the build. We are also giving time and effort to promoting our partnership, such as at this conference, to other like-minded organisations, conservation land managers, funders, philanthropists or indeed ecotourism operators who may be interested in getting together for mutual benefit.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Global Eco Asia-Pacific Ecotourism Conference Wednesday 9th November, 2011 Partnerships - Ecotourism and Protected Areas - A Case Study Leonie Gale & Angus M Robinson Caring for Australia’s Natural and Cultural Heritage since 1970 Caring for Australia’s Natural and Cultural Heritage since 1970
    • 2. <ul><li>Seven Principles of Ecotourism </li></ul><ul><li>Involves travel to natural destinations </li></ul><ul><li>Minimises impact </li></ul><ul><li>Builds environmental awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Provides direct financial benefits for conservation </li></ul><ul><li>Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people </li></ul><ul><li>Respects local culture </li></ul><ul><li>Supports human rights and democratic movements </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Honey, 2008: Ecotourism and Sustainable Development </li></ul>
    • 3. <ul><li>Foundation </li></ul>
    • 4. <ul><li>Foundation achievements </li></ul>
    • 5. <ul><li>Foundation achievements </li></ul>
    • 6. <ul><li>Foundation achievements </li></ul>
    • 7. <ul><li>Foundation achievements </li></ul>
    • 8. <ul><li>Foundation achievements </li></ul>
    • 9. &nbsp;
    • 10. &nbsp;
    • 11. <ul><li>Case Study: Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>World class nature destination
    • 12. <ul><li>Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>Minimal impact, local benefits
    • 13. <ul><li>Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>Builds environmental awareness
    • 14. <ul><li>Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>Provides direct financial benefits for conservation
    • 15. <ul><li>Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>Respects local culture
    • 16. <ul><li>Yuraygir Coastal Walk </li></ul>Supports human rights
    • 17. <ul><li>Strategic partnerships </li></ul>Ecotourism and protected areas
    • 18. <ul><li>Strategic partnerships </li></ul>The Foundation model
    • 19. <ul><li>Strategic partnerships </li></ul>The Foundation model
    • 20. <ul><li>Strategic partnerships </li></ul>The Foundation model
    • 21. <ul><li>Strategic partnership opportunities </li></ul>Ecotourism and protected areas
    • 22. <ul><li>Strategic partnership opportunities </li></ul>Ecotourism and protected areas
    • 23. <ul><li>Strategic partnership opportunities </li></ul>Ecotourism and protected areas
    • 24. <ul><li>Strategic partnerships </li></ul>An invitation from the Foundation
    • 25. Steve Corbett Susanna Bradshaw Michelle Dunn Melanie Wagner Call us on: (02) 9221 1949 Email us at: [email_address] Visit our website: www.fnpw.org.au

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