ECU lecture 21_september2012
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Commercial and philanthropic opportunities for enhancing wildlife conservation through ecotourism

Commercial and philanthropic opportunities for enhancing wildlife conservation through ecotourism

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ECU lecture 21_september2012 Document Transcript

  • 1. CaringCaring for Australia’s Natural and Cultural Heritagesince 1970 for Australia’s Natural and Cultural Heritage since 1970 Angus M Robinson, Adjunct Lecturer School of Marketing, Tourism & Leisure Commercial and philanthropic opportunities for enhancing wildlife conservation through ecotourism Friday 21 September, 2012 ‘Planning & Development’ Lecture
  • 2. Varied career background in a range of industries, including in tourism, executive roles at Taronga Zoo, Earth Exchange Museum, and Mt Hotham Alpine Resort. Chair, Geotourism Sub Committee, Geological Society of Australia. Board member, Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife (FNPW. Certified ecotourism operator. Lecturer – Angus M Robinson
  • 3. Summary of Lecture Points Philanthropy Opportunities and Vision Australian National Landscapes Current Ecotourism related partnerships Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife A question of definitions and principles Lecture Points
  • 4. The National Estate includes national parks and other lands reserved for public usage i.e. ‘protected areas’. The term (‘National Estate’) was incorporated into the Australian Heritage Commission Act and is used to describe a collection of buildings and sites that are worthy of preservation for a variety of reasons. It covers natural environments as well as European history and Aboriginal culture. National Estate
  • 5. Natural heritage is the legacy of natural objects and intangible attributes encompassing the countryside and natural environment, including flora and fauna, scientifically known as biodiversity, and geology, landforms and soil landscapes i.e. geodiversity. Understanding Natural Heritage
  • 6. Boley, B.B. after Thompson, S. 2009 Indigenous Tourism Cuisine Agritourism Heritage ECOTOURISM Tourism Cultural Sightseeing Tourism i.e. ‘experiential tourism’ ‘Geotourism’ incorporating all types of ‘place-based’ tourism
  • 7. Source: Honey, 2008: Ecotourism and Sustainable Development and The International Ecotourism Society, 1990 Ecotourism – responsible travel to natural areas that conserves the environment and improves the well-being of local people, defined by a set of principles Adventure tourism is nature tourism ‘on steroids’ Wildlife tourism involves travel to observe animals, birds and fish in their native habitats. Nature tourism – involves travel to unspolied places to experience and enjoy nature Recreation activities: A Question of Definitions
  • 8. Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people Respects local culture Supports human rights and democratic movements, AND Provides direct financial benefits for conservation 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Source: Honey, 2008: Ecotourism and Sustainable Development Involves travel to natural destinations 1. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 9. Involves Travel to Natural Destinations
  • 10. Involves travel to natural destinations Minimises impact 1. 2. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 11. Minimises Impact
  • 12. Involves travel to natural destinations Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness 1. 2. 3. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 13. Builds Environmental Awareness
  • 14. Involves travel to natural destinations Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people 1. 2. 3. 4. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 15. For every tour that is purchased, travellers will help make a difference to the local community and natural environment in North Borneo. A portion of tour revenue is set aside to fund various projects in Kudat, Kinabatangan and Kundasang through a non-profit organisation, Borneo Ecotourism Solutions and Technologies Society. A sister company, Sukau Rainforest Lodge also contributes RM4.00 since 2000 for every international guest who stays at the lodge. Borneo Ecotours
  • 16. Involves travel to natural destinations Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people Respects local culture 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 17. Respecting Local Culture
  • 18. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 19. Involves travel to natural destinations Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people Respects local culture Supports human rights and democratic movements 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 20. Supports human rights Yuraygir Coastal Walk
  • 21. Minimises impact Builds environmental awareness Provides financial benefits and empowerment for local people Respects local culture Supports human rights and democratic movements Provides direct financial benefits for conservation 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Source: Honey, 2008: Ecotourism and Sustainable Development Involves travel to natural destinations 1. Seven Principles of Ecotourism
  • 22. Ecotourism is ecologically sustainable tourism with a primary focus on experiencing natural areas that fosters environmental and cultural understanding, appreciation and conservation. Ecotourism Australia believes that the ultimate definition of ecotourism is compliance with the core criteria stated within the Eco Certification Program. Australian Definition of Ecotourism
  • 23. Currently no specific focus on philanthropy and funding of wildlife conservation research. In Australia, ECO Certification has three levels of achievement which have been developed to accommodate for a range of businesses and, • their level of commitment to sustainability, dedication/applicability to social and cultural responsibilities, and • the level of interpretation and education involved in the product(s). Eco Certification Criteria
  • 24. Source: Oxford Dictionary a philanthropic institution; a charity. the desire to promote the welfare of others, expressed especially by the generous donation of money to good causes. Definition of Philanthropy
  • 25. Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife
  • 26. Today the Foundation continues the tradition of growing parks and caring for them and the species that inhabit them. When then Premier of NSW, the Hon Tom Lewis MP, first established the NSW National Parks & Wildlife Service, he had a vision of establishing a complementary organisation, constituted mainly from the corporate sector, to acquire parks for the Service. Hence the birth of the Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife in 1970. The Foundation
  • 27. Foundation achievements
  • 28. There are tax incentives for landholders donating land but the real value is the growth of our national parks and the protection given to our plants and animals cared for under their management. The Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife is the only organisation in Australia whose philanthropy is an investment in our public estate, for all to enjoy. Volunteering Land for Conservation
  • 29. The FNPW funds threatened species recovery programs. The FNPW has saved animals such as the Lord Howe Island woodhen, Gould’s Petrel and the Yellow-footed Rock-wallaby from extinction. Over its history the FNPW has added over 500,000 hectares to Australia’s national reserve system, for the enjoyment of all. 1. Foundation Achievements
  • 30. Finally, the FNPW involves the community in the conservation of Australia's native plants and animals through environmental education. The Foundation protects our heritage icons as sources of inspiration for future generations of Australians and visitors from across the world. Some examples of cultural heritage FNPW has helped protect include the World Heritage Old Great North Road, Kosciuszko Historic Huts, Fort Denison, and Mungo. 2. Foundation Achievements
  • 31. Pleistocene dune system & ancient lake highlighting 50,000 years of continuous human habitation Willandra Lakes World Heritage Area and Mungo National Park
  • 32. To date the Foundation has saved four species from extinction and funded projects to research and conserve over 30 other Australian plant and animal species. Since its inception in 1970, the Foundation has been funding scientifically based projects for the benefit of Australian native species. FNPW and Philanthropy
  • 33. Over 40 Years of Caring
  • 34. Foundation achievements
  • 35. Foundation achievements
  • 36. Foundation achievements
  • 37. The Foundation continues to purchase suitable land to add to and extend our national reserves for future generations. National Parks remain the core of our protected land system. Growing our parks is essential to safeguard our natural heritage for future Australians. Growing Our National Parks
  • 38. Ecotourism & Protected Areas – Yuraygir Coastal Walk Strategic Partnerships
  • 39. Yuraygir Coastal Walk, NSW
  • 40. Minimal impact, local benefits Yuraygir Coastal Walk
  • 41. ‘Follow the Coastal Emu’ Yuraygir Coastal Walk
  • 42. Providing direct financial benefits for conservation Yuraygir Coastal Walk
  • 43. Respecting Local Culture Yuraygir Coastal Walk
  • 44. Strategic partnerships Accommodation providers within Protected areas
  • 45. Ecotourism & Wildlife Conservation – Eastern Quoll, Tasmania Strategic Partnership Opportunities
  • 46. To undertake these projects in the area in which the ecotour is being undertaken. Future: To act ‘on call’ as an interested sponsor of threatened species wildlife conservation projects which have as their principal objective, the maintenance and/or regeneration of wildlife habitat. These projects can be located either within national parks or within public or private lands in any location in Australia. Now: Philanthropy Vision
  • 47. Eastern Quoll Trapping, Tasmania
  • 48. Eastern Quoll Monitoring
  • 49. Eastern Quoll Pathology Testing
  • 50. Eastern Quoll – A Bloodied Experience!
  • 51. Help scientists study the response of koalas to climate change to conserve their habitats and population. Traverse the Great Otway NP while conducting valuable research on koala habitats to understand the impact of climate change on population and behaviour. During organised expeditions, volunteers will get the chance to work closely with koalas and be involved in all aspects of the research. Leisure Solutions® is a current year sponsor. Koala Research Program for Volunteers Earthwatch Great Otway NP, Victoria
  • 52. The project seeks to explore the direct effect of climate change on koalas by examining which parts of the landscape and which tree species koalas use, and what condition they are in during a heat wave. Koalas are dependent on selecting the right tree in the right place at the right time. Wildlife Conservation Koala ‘Tree Choice’ Gunnedah, NSW
  • 53. Foundation for National Parks & Wildlife University of Sydney School of Biological Sciences & Veterinary School Landcare NSW Inc Gunnedah Research Centre National Parks & Wildlife Service Koala Tree Choice Participants
  • 54. European farming settlements, Dorothy Mackellar, and indigenous culture (Kamilaroi peoples etc.) Macropods, koalas, profilic birdlife common – Koala Capital of Australia! Mixed dry land eucalypts and Pilliga Scrub varieties e.g. Cypress Pine, Casuarinas etc. Gunnedah Basin Permian Coal Measures and covered by Triassic sediments and rich volcanic derived soils – broad flood plains with class 1 to 5 soils. Gunnedah Natural Heritage
  • 55. Tracking Koalas
  • 56. Koala in a Tree
  • 57. Koala Wrangling
  • 58. Koala Wrangling
  • 59. Koala Examination
  • 60. Koala Unwrangling
  • 61. Koala Back in the Wild
  • 62. Thanks A Lot!
  • 63. Koala Scat Research!
  • 64. Australia’s National Landscapes
  • 65. Flinders Ranges National Landscape
  • 66. Flinders Ranges National Landscape
  • 67. The Cazneaux Tree - Flinders Ranges NP
  • 68. This protocol has already seen the inclusion of a geotrail project as an endorsed program of the Experience Development Strategy (EDS) for the Green Cauldron National Landscape. The Geological Society of Australia and Parks Australia have recently concluded a protocol to enable the input of geoscience information into National Landscapes programs. National Landscape/GSA Protocol
  • 69. Scenic Rim – Green Cauldron National Landscape
  • 70. The program supports sustainable tourism development by connecting travelers to projects that improve the environment, boost local incomes, and enhance the destination for future visitors. The fund opens the door for travelers to give back to Ethiopia, ensuring their visits leave a positive impact. The USAID-funded Ethiopia Sustainable Tourism Alliance, with support from Sustainable Travel International, is proud to introduce the Ethiopia Travelers Philanthropy Fund. Travelers Philanthropy - Ethiopa
  • 71. There are two ways to give – directly to the responsible non-profits that have been vetted through the fund or on the Global Giving website. e.g. plant a tree in a village or provide an energy saving stove to a family. Travelers can donate to and visit local communities that are working hard to protect their forests and rehabilitate degraded land. Visitors can book a trip through one of their partnering tour operators and request that the itinerary includes a visit to one/both of the project sites. Tour operators are including visits to conservation and community development projects in their itineraries. Travelers Philanthropy - Ethiopa
  • 72. Field Research ‘experiential’ tourism - ‘ecotourists’. http://www.ecotourism.org/voluntourism-guidelines ‘voluntourists’ e.g. Earthwatch, Conservation Volunteers Australia, World Expeditions etc. Sponsorship of vehicle leases. Per unit donations for research costs e.g. pathology tests, GPS collars. Corporate sponsorship of part or full project costs. Royalty payments from tour operators on prorata basis. Philanthropy Opportunities linked to Ecotourism
  • 73. 22. DOI 10.1007/s10640-011-9515-5. and Endangered Species in a National Park. Environmental and Resource Economics. 52: 1- Source: Bednar-Friedl, B., Behrens, D.A. and Getzner, M. (2012) Optimal Dynamic Control of Visitors species conservation measures, such as species restocking. habitat conservation measures, i.e. expanding buffer zones or creating quiet zones with the help of signposts, and visitor control limiting visitors Three types of measures were specifically highlighted by the mathematical model: The 'two-edged' effect of ecotourism, whereby visitors provide revenues for costly conservation efforts, whilst at the same time potentially affecting endangered species, can be managed to ensure species' population levels are not affected. Tauern National Park, Austria and the Endangered Rock Partridge Case Study
  • 74. The FNPW is one leading ‘not for profit’ NGO which can provide a vehicle for ecotourism driven philanthropy. In time, it is predicted that eco-certification will directly embrace wildlife conservation support. With an increasing level of promotion of ‘nature based’ tourism into both established protected areas and National Landscapes, more opportunities will arise. Demonstrated opportunities are now readily available for industry participation. By definition, ecotourism requires a commitment by tour operators and accommodation providers to contribute to providing direct financial benefits for conservation. Lecture Points Summary
  • 75. Email arobinson@fnpw.org.au angus@leisuresolutions.com.au Call us (02) 9221 1949 Follow us on twitter http://twitter.com/fnpw Become our friend on Facebook www.facebook.com/fnpw.1970 www.facebook.com/backyardbuddies Visit our website www.fnpw.org.au and sign up for our newsletter! For more Information about FNPW