Cosmic Radiation in Australia
Julia Carpenter, Brendan Tate, Rick Tinker, Stephen Solomon
ARPANSA
Contact: Julia.Carpenter...
Background Radiation:
• Terrestrial Sources
• Man‐Made Sources
• Cosmogenic Sources
• Galactic (108 to 1020+ eV)
• Solar (...
• Altitude
‐ As altitude 
decreases, particle 
energy decreases
‐ Decay and 
interaction with 
particles in the 
earth’s a...
• Use CARI‐6 to generate a data set of average annual 
cosmic radiation dose as a function of longitude, latitude 
and alt...
5 
Annual outdoor doses (uSv) from cosmic radiation
• US Federal Aviation Administration (FFA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute
• To calculate the dose an adult would receiv...
• Grasty and LaMarre (2004) – Canada and USA
• Shielding factor of 0.8
• Indoor time fraction 0.8
• Results averaged of 4 ...
• Ground‐based measurements of cosmic radiation in Melbourne
• Yarra River near Fairfield (freshwater region)
• Depth grea...
9 
10 
11 
• Reuter‐Stokes High Pressure Ionisation Chamber (HPIC)  (80mins)
• Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector. (Backg...
13 
Population‐weighted Dose (Outdoors)
Average annual cosmic radiation dose 
for 208 regions (ABS Census Data)
14 
Population‐weighted dose – Capital Cities (Outdoors)
• Population weighted outdoor dose rate for Australia is 360µSva‐1
averaged over the 11 year solar cycle
• Range of 262µSv...
• We now have a detailed map of cosmic radiation variability in 
Australia.
• The average population‐weighted dose for Aus...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Cosmic radiation in australia carpenter

763 views
599 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
763
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cosmic radiation in australia carpenter

  1. 1. Cosmic Radiation in Australia Julia Carpenter, Brendan Tate, Rick Tinker, Stephen Solomon ARPANSA Contact: Julia.Carpenter@arpansa.gov.au
  2. 2. Background Radiation: • Terrestrial Sources • Man‐Made Sources • Cosmogenic Sources • Galactic (108 to 1020+ eV) • Solar (100 MeV or less) 2  Background Radiation  Webb, Solomon and Thomson (1999) – Sources and Effects of Ionizing Radiation Background Radiation Levels and Medical Exposure Levels in Australia. Aims: • To produce a detailed map of cosmic radiation variability in Australia • To find a population‐weighted annual dose from cosmic radiation in Australia This is part of a larger project within ARPANSA to reassess background  radiation pathways in Australia
  3. 3. • Altitude ‐ As altitude  decreases, particle  energy decreases ‐ Decay and  interaction with  particles in the  earth’s atmosphere. 3  Cosmic radiation • Solar Cycle • Latitude ‐ Charged particles  interact with the  earth’s magnetic  field
  4. 4. • Use CARI‐6 to generate a data set of average annual  cosmic radiation dose as a function of longitude, latitude  and altitude. • Digital elevation grid (Geoscience Australia) 4  Calculating Australian Exposure to Cosmic Radiation • Repeat for each year from 1996 to 2008 • Use MapInfo to create thematic maps
  5. 5. 5  Annual outdoor doses (uSv) from cosmic radiation
  6. 6. • US Federal Aviation Administration (FFA) Civil Aerospace Medical Institute • To calculate the dose an adult would receive from cosmic radiation on a  designated flight path or at a user‐specified altitude and geographic  location. • Uses a heliocentric potential model of solar modulation which has  been shown to accurately calculate effective doses to aviation  workers in a range of solar conditions (O’Brien et al., 2005) • Effects of geomagnetic field also taken into account, however  radiation from solar particle events not included. • Dose rates from LUIN99, a database that accounts for fluence when calculating effective dose coefficients. • So how well does it work at sea level? 6  CARI‐6
  7. 7. • Grasty and LaMarre (2004) – Canada and USA • Shielding factor of 0.8 • Indoor time fraction 0.8 • Results averaged of 4 solar cycles • Annual effective dose  (population weighted) = 318µSv • NCRP‐160 (2009) – USA • Weighting factor of 0.83 applied to correct for shielding and time  spent indoors • Annual effective dose of 330µSv for adults in the 99 most  populated US cities 7  CARI‐6
  8. 8. • Ground‐based measurements of cosmic radiation in Melbourne • Yarra River near Fairfield (freshwater region) • Depth greater than 3m • At least 20m to banks in all directions • Low banks  • Access to wooden rowboats 8  Verification 70 m 60 m
  9. 9.
  10. 10. 10 
  11. 11. 11 
  12. 12. • Reuter‐Stokes High Pressure Ionisation Chamber (HPIC)  (80mins) • Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) scintillation detector. (Background spectrum) • Distinct peaks corresponding to K‐40 and Th‐228 from terrestrial  background radiation were observed in the spectrum. These were  assessed by stripping off their contributions to the background spectrum  and calculating the fraction of the air kerma contribution (approx  4nSv/h) 12  Results The net cosmic ray contribution  measured at this site was 45.2 +/‐ 2.1 nGyh‐1 CARI‐6 calculated the cosmic ray  dose to be 43.9 nSvh‐1 at the  corresponding geographic  coordinates, based on the  heliocentric potential model of  solar modulation data for that  day.
  13. 13. 13  Population‐weighted Dose (Outdoors) Average annual cosmic radiation dose  for 208 regions (ABS Census Data)
  14. 14. 14  Population‐weighted dose – Capital Cities (Outdoors)
  15. 15. • Population weighted outdoor dose rate for Australia is 360µSva‐1 averaged over the 11 year solar cycle • Range of 262µSva‐1 to 565µSva‐1 (over 208 regions) • Population‐weighted indoor dose rate for Australia is estimated to be  302µSva‐1 • Indoor time fraction = 0.8 (UNSCEAR, 2008) • Shielding factor = 0.8 (UNSCEAR 2008) 15  Population‐weighted dose (Indoors)
  16. 16. • We now have a detailed map of cosmic radiation variability in  Australia. • The average population‐weighted dose for Australia is  estimated to be 302µSva‐1. • This dose is below the world‐average dose • In Australia, the factors that have the largest influence on  cosmic radiation dose are altitude and latitude. 16  Summary/Conclusion

×