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Legal Law Document Transcript

  • 1. Atlanta Legal Aid Society 2007 Annual Report
  • 2. Table of Contents Year in Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Run Sponsors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Outcomes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Main Office Caseload Statistics for 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 151 Spring Street, NW Atlanta, Georgia 30303-2097 Operation Unit Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 404.524.5811 AIDS Legal Project/Cancer and . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Decatur Office ALS Legal Initiative/Breast Cancer Legal Project 246 Sycamore Street, Suite 120 Decatur, Georgia 30030-3434 Family Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 404.377.0701 Georgia Senior Legal Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Cobb Legal Aid General Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 30 South Park Square, Suite 101 Marietta, Georgia 30090 Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 770.528.2568 Hispanic Outreach Law Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Gwinnett Legal Aid 180 Camden Hill Road, Suite A Health Law Partnership (HeLP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Lawrenceville, Georgia 30045 678.376.4545 Home Defense Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Southside Office Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 1514 East Cleveland Ave., Suite 100 Atlanta, Georgia 30344-6904 Mental Health and Disability Rights Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 404.669.0233 Senior Citizens Law Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Georgia Senior Legal Hotline TeamChild Atlanta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2 Peachtree Street, 36th Floor Atlanta, Georgia 30303 Collaborative Technology Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 404.657.9915 Fellowship Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Long-term Care Ombudsman Program Volunteer Attorneys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 246 Sycamore Street, Suite 248 Decatur, Georgia 30030-3434 Pro Bono Partnership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 404.371.3800 2007 Financial Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Hearing Impaired 404.577.3727 Sources of Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Spanish Hotline The 2007 Annual Campaign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 404.377.5381 Major Donors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Officers and Board of Directors 2007 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Staff Roster . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
  • 3. As in every annual report, my letter reviews the state of Atlanta Legal Aid. This year, I decided to use our recently adopted strategic business plan as a framework to judge how we did in 2007. By all accounts, we remain the same effective and vibrant program we have been for over 80 years . Not surprisingly, our strategic plan calls for high-quality representation of our clients on cases, both small and large. In 2007, we had over 20,000 such cases and got exceptional outcomes – helping over 400 people in domestic violence situations, protecting over 1,400 persons against loss of their housing (including 110 homeowners) and obtaining nearly $1,750,000 of savings for clients on consumer cases. On a broader level, we were again asked for our expertise on significant policy questions, which affect our clients, on issues ranging from child support guidelines to Medicaid benefits for disabled persons. Just recently, one of our attorneys was one of only two legal aid lawyers in the country invited to a personal meeting with Ben Bernanke, the chairman of the Federal Reserve board, to give him her analysis on the Federal Reserve’s new proposed regulations on predatory mortgage lending. We also responded to the increased needs of our fastest growing counties, Gwinnett, Cobb and Clayton, by adding additional lawyer staff to each of the offices serving those counties. Moreover, we responded to the new immigrants of those counties, particularly Spanish-speaking populations. With funds from the Goizueta Foundation, we have been able to support five Spanish-speaking paralegals. We plan to add bilingual lawyers (either hired or trained), with the goal of having a lawyer- paralegal team in each office. We continued to increase our use of volunteer attorneys. Last year, we had ten private-attorney fellows, including a fellow from the legal department at United Parcel Service – the first legal aid fellow in the country to come from the in-house legal department of a corporation. These fellows each spent four months doing regular staff attorney work and significantly added to our ability to serve our clients with their most basic legal problems. In addition, we developed new programs with private lawyers. Two notable projects involved our representation of clients with cancer. We enlisted Troutman Sanders to provide wills to clients with cancer, some of whom were referred to us by 1 the American Cancer Society. And Sutherland, Asbill & Brennan has begun to represent clients with cancer in their initial applications for disability and Medicaid benefits, to help them avoid waiting the years it takes to get an initial denial overturned at a hearing. Having said all this, the quality of our program is still best shown by what is hardest to measure - the quality and enthusiasm of our staff. Just recently the Legal Services Corporation (LSC) sent one of their staff attorneys for an informal visit to our program. As I usually do with such visitors, I invited her to meet with staff informally as we walked down the halls and in casual get-togethers. After being here only about four hours one afternoon, she had no hesitancy in telling our executive committee the next morning that we were a “top notch” program. I am not surprised that she reached that conclusion, only that she noticed it so quickly. While it is certainly good that our largest funder thinks well of the program, I realized that I was pleased simply because I wanted her as an outsider to recognize the quality of our staff and of our work. I wanted her to see what I have seen every day for many years, and what I saw throughout 2007 – a staff that makes me proud to be the executive director of Atlanta Legal Aid. Steve Gottlieb Executive Director
  • 4. Year in Pictures 2
  • 5. Run Sponsors Marathon Sprint 3 Pacesetter Supporter
  • 6. Outcomes Family Law Number of Adults and Children Protected from Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .414 Number of Children Provided Financial Support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .349 Amount of Financial Support Per Family Per Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $84,937 Number of Persons Provided Family Stability through Adoption, Visitation, Custody or Legitimation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .849 Housing Number of Persons Getting or Retaining Affordable Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,294 Number of Homes Saved/Protected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .110 Equity of Home Saved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,625,200 Consumer Number of Persons Avoiding Excessive or Unlawful Debt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Total Amount of Consumer Savings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,732,065 Caseload Statistics for 2007 Consumer Bankruptcy/Debtor Relief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .789 Collection (Repossession, Deficiency, Garnishment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,356 4 Contracts/Warranties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .338 Collection Practices/Creditor Harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 General Loans and Contracts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Motor Vehicle Sales Contracts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .173 Public Utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84 Unfair Sales Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .152 Other Consumer/Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .209 Total Consumer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,211 Education/Juvenile Law Public School Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Special Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Education - Student Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .116 Other Education. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .85 Total Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 299 Employment Employment Discrimination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Wage Claims. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .157 Pensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Other Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .260 Total Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 486
  • 7. Family Law Adoptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .174 Custody / Visitations / Modifications / Contempt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1643 Divorce / Separations / Annulment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3282 Guardianship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .217 Name Change. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .131 Parental Rights Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Paternity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 Domestic Abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .421 Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .910 Legitimations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .245 Birth Certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69 Other Family Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .257 Total Family Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7,395 Health Law Eligibility/Termination . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .122 Nursing Home / Medicaid / Spousal Impoverishment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .171 Medicaid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .451 Medicare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53 Long Term Health Care Facilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76 Other Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .97 Total Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 970 Housing 5 Public and Subsidized Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1406 Property Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 Foreclosures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .134 Home Ownership / Real Property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .755 Private Landlord/Tenant. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,492 Other Housing Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .204 Total Housing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5,021 Income Maintenance TANF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .75 Food Stamps/Commodities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .315 General Social Security Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .426 General SSI Issues. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .293 Unemployment Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .380 Veteran’s Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 Other Income Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Income Maintenance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,574
  • 8. Individual Rights General Mental Health Issues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Disability Rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .88 Financial Exploitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Other Individual Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .114 Total Individual Rights . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 287 Miscellaneous Torts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .125 Property Titles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25 End of Life Planning & Probate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .878 Other Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .301 Subtotal Miscellaneous . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,329 Cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,551 Cases by Project AIDS Legal Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .320 Cancer/ALS Legal Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .221 Clayton County Pro Bono. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .438 Cobb County Pro Bono . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .215 Cobb County Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,048 DeKalb County Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,793 Dekalb Family Law Information Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .503 6 Downtown Domestic Relations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,303 Downtown General Law. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,607 Georgia Senior Legal Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,882 Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .147 Gwinnett County Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,957 Gwinnett County Family Law Information Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .337 Gwinnett County Pro Bono . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 HealthLaw Partnership (HeLP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .303 Senior Citizens Law Project . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .603 South Fulton/Clayton County Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,813 Total Cases per Assigned Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20,551 Ombudsman Investigations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,133 Grand Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21,684
  • 9. AIDS Legal Project/Cancer and ALS Legal Initiative/Breast Cancer Legal Project Founded in 1989, the AIDS Legal Project continued to provide essential legal services to persons living with HIV/AIDS. In 2007, the AIDS Legal Project represented 320 low-income persons living with HIV/AIDS. The AIDS Legal Project is the only service organization that addresses exclusively the legal needs of the Atlanta HIV/AIDS community. It receives support from the City of Atlanta under a HOPWA (Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS) grant from HUD, from Fulton County under a Ryan White CARE (Comprehensive AIDS Resources Emergency) Act grant from HRSA, and from the Atlanta AIDS Partnership Fund through a grant administered by the United Way of Metropolitan Atlanta and the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta. The Cancer and ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s Disease) Legal Initiative and the Breast Cancer Legal Project served 221clients. The end of 2007 marked the second anniversary of our Breast Cancer Legal Project, a two-year Equal Justice Works fellowship originally funded by Ford & Harrison and staffed by Haley A. Schwartz. The project will continue through the suppor t of the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, Greater Atlanta Affiliate. 7 Typical cases involve access to income, health care, housing and issues of self-empowerment, including preparation of wills, advance directives and family issues. The Projects and Initiative also help clients protect their rights as defined under the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fair Housing Act, and other statutes. In addition to individual casework, the projects have provided thousands of people with free information, legal advice, and community education at health fairs, client and volunteer training sessions, and professional education seminars. In 2007, AIDS Survival Project recognized the work of director John Warchol through the John Kappers AIDS Community Service Award. John has managed the project since 1997. It was under his leadership that the project grew to encompass cancer and ALS work. Mia lived with breast cancer. But for decades she also lived with emotional and financial abuse by her husband. Her husband used money and access to it to control Mia. Like many victims of domestic violence, she believed it was her fault. The abuse increased when Mia’s breast cancer diagnosis became terminal. When her husband thought she was too sick to notice, he transferred their joint assets and bank accounts into his name only. Left with access to only a few hundred dollars and fighting a terminal illness, Mia had had enough. She called us. We helped Mia file a separate maintenance action and were able to have her share of the assets transferred back into her control. We also helped Mia with estate planning. Shortly after we began representing Mia, she died. However, she died knowing that her assets were protected. Through the formation of a trust, Mia ensured that her assets would go to support and care for her two young children.
  • 10. Family Law Atlanta Legal Aid lawyers represent many clients in family law cases in all of our counties. Well over a third of the cases handled by Legal Aid last year were family law matters. We continue to focus our family law work on stopping family violence, providing stability and financial support for children and for elderly or disabled adults. Some of our family law work is done through special units or projects. For example, the Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project helps grandparents and other relatives to adopt children they have been rearing. This unique project teams lawyers from private firms with Legal Aid staff attorneys who have developed special expertise in this area of the law. Their work provides increased stability for the children and often enables the grandparents to obtain additional resources to support the children. However, the bulk of our family law work continues to be done by lawyers and paralegals in general law units in each county. We provide ongoing advice and representation to clients in a wide range of family law problems, including family violence, custody, child support, divorce, legitimation, and visitation. In addition, Atlanta Legal Aid staff has continued to play a large role helping the local superior courts in Fulton, Gwinnett and DeKalb to maintain Family Law Information Centers to provide forms and advice for the rising numbers of litigants trying to represent themselves on family law matters. This past year, Legal Aid’s Southside Office began working with the Clayton County Superior Court to establish one of these centers. 8 Marie, a native of the Caribbean, is a young mother with a toddler. Marie’s native language was French, but she had been studying English since her move to the U.S. She and her husband lived in DeKalb County, far from her home and family. They separated because of his violent behavior. Marie and the toddler moved into a domestic violence shelter. She obtained a temporary protective order against him. The order also gave her custody of their child, and required him to pay child support, but he was not paying it. She tried to file a contempt motion on her own to enforce the child support provision. Marie asked court personnel what to do, and they referred her to the Family Law Information Center. At the center, she met with one of the lawyers from Atlanta Legal Aid, who recommended that she not try to handle the matter herself, referred her to the local Legal Aid office for representation and called ahead to explain Marie’s situation to the staff there. The Legal Aid lawyer filed the contempt motion to enforce the child support in the TPO case. Marie’s husband fought back by filing a contempt motion of his own, claiming that Marie was not obeying the visitation provisions in the TPO. When the court heard the two contempt motions, Marie and her lawyer were able to show the court that Marie had been obeying the visitation provisions as well as she could without reliable transportation. They also got an income deduction order, so that the child support could be paid directly from her husband’s wages. Later, the lawyer represented Marie in getting a divorce, including a permanent order for sole custody, visitation provisions to protect her safety when the child was picked up and dropped off, child support and alimony with an income deduction order to enforce regular payments.
  • 11. Georgia Senior Legal Hotline The Georgia Senior Legal Hotline, a special project of Atlanta Legal Aid Society, is a cooperative effort among Atlanta Legal Aid Society and the Georgia Division of Aging Services, Georgia Legal Services Program, the State Bar Pro Bono Project and the Atlanta Bar Association. The Hotline accepts calls from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, and provides seniors over the age of 60 throughout the state with legal advice, brief ser vices, self-help materials and referral to other sources of help. Although the program provides information and referral services to all older Georgians, it targets senior citizens who are economically needy, frail or at risk. A secondary purpose of the Hotline is to support existing legal projects serving Georgia’s elderly by referring to them those cases in which a client needs more in-depth assistance than can be provided by the Hotline staff. In 2005, the Hotline received additional funding to also provide legal advice and referrals to grandparents and relative caregivers of any age who are raising minor children in Georgia. In 2007, the Hotline handled 2,882 cases and fielded 13,565 calls. Hotline staff consists of one full-time managing attorney, six part-time attorneys, and volunteer lawyers and law students. It offers quality legal services at no cost to an under-served segment of the population and provides a sound alternative for meeting the needs of older individuals who find it difficult to access legal assistance. In April 2007, sixty-five year old Mrs. Walker purchased new dentures for the total cost of $2,400. She financed $1,400 through 9 the dentist’s office. The dentist never fitted the dentures properly, severely restricting Mrs. Walker’s ability to eat nourishing food. After requests to fix the problem were refused, Mrs. Walker stopped making payments. The dental office began collection attempts. Mrs. Walker sought help from the Hotline. A Hotline attorney wrote a letter demanding refund of the Mrs. Walker’s payments as well as cessation of collection attempts. When the dentist refused, the Hotline attorney advised Mrs. Walker on filing a contract and malpractice action in small claims court. Further, the attorney facilitated referral to a geriatric dentist, who provided the requisite, supporting affidavit. Immediately after being served, counsel for the dentist offered Mrs. Walker $2,000 to settle. She negotiated removal of the adverse account information from her credit report and received the money in full. Mrs. Walker reports that her health has improved as she received proper treatment from her new dentist and can now enjoy solid food.
  • 12. General Law The core of Atlanta Legal Aid Society’s representation comes through the General Law practice. General Law offers advice and representation in employment cases, landlord-tenant disputes and public benefits. General Law also helps with a wide variety of consumer and public education issues. Each office has a General Law practice, which covers the most basic needs of our clients, yet can also offer advice and assistance in complex issues. General Law clients are typically the lowest income individuals who seek help from Atlanta Legal Aid, and who, therefore, are often the most vulnerable. The goal of most General Law cases is simply the preservation of the rights of the client under existing law. Carol is the victim of a stalker. The stalker not only terrorizes Carol by making harassing phone calls to her and threatening her and her family, but also makes anonymous complaints to businesses and agencies Carol uses including utility companies, the Department of Family and Children’s Services and the Atlanta Housing Authority. The stalker has been terrorizing Carol since August 2004. Carol lost her housing after the stalker made false complaints to the Atlanta Housing Authority and Georgia Power that Carol was stealing electricity. Carol came to us for legal assistance and we were able to obtain housing for Carol and her family. Carol was also able to work with utility companies to restore and protect her accounts. Recently, the stalker was indicted for her unlawful activities by the Fulton County District 10 Attorney’s office.
  • 13. Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project The Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project began over ten years ago in response to the growing number of grandparents and other relatives who are raising children in the place of absent or deceased parents. Relative caregivers, many of whom are retired and living on fixed incomes, often struggle to care and provide for the new members of their households. The Project’s priority is to stabilize the legal relationship between the relative and the child through an adoption or custody proceeding. For the third year in a row, the Project received a grant from the Georgia Department of Human Resources Division of Aging Services to increase the services provided to clients. With this grant, the Project works to ensure that the clients are maximizing all of the financial and medical resources available to the children in their care. The Project also drafts last will and testament, advance directive, and nomination of guardian documents for the caregivers. The Project’s two attorneys provide direct representation to clients. In addition, they recruit, train, coordinate, and serve as back up to volunteer attorneys who provide additional client representation. This year the Project trained nearly 70 attorneys to provide pro bono adoption services to the Project’s clients. More than 400 attorneys throughout the metro Atlanta area have been trained since the inception of the Project. More than half of the attorneys working on cases are employed at Kilpatrick Stockton, which has made the Project one of its flagship pro bono projects. 11 Ms. Moore knew that depression ran in her family – her uncle and brother had both committed suicide. However, she had no idea that both she and her sister would marry into families with histories of depression. Ms. Moore’s husband committed suicide. Shortly thereafter, Ms. Moore’s sister was murdered by her own husband, who then took his own life. After the tragedy, her sister’s three boys came to live with Ms. Moore, and they grieved together. Now, after several years of counseling for her and her nephews, Ms. Moore is adopting the three children. The Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project arranged for the adoption proceedings for the family. Though still recovering from the tragic events of the past, they are comforted to know they can count on the continued love, support and stability of the new family they have created.
  • 14. Hispanic Outreach Law Project The Hispanic Outreach Law Project advises, refers and represents Spanish-speaking clients in the five-county metropolitan area that Atlanta Legal Aid serves. A Spanish Hotline is available for clients to speak directly with a staff member four half-days a week and to leave messages in their native language; a Spanish- speaking attorney and paralegal then screen these clients.The project continues the development of strong collaborative relationships with agencies that serve the Hispanic community. The Goizueta Foundation continued to be the main source of funding for the Hispanic Outreach Law Project during 2007. The project now boasts two-and-a-half attorneys and five paralegals. Spanish-speaking residents in Cobb, South Fulton, Clayton and Gwinnett counties now have an option to calling the Spanish Hotline – they can call the office in their area directly and speak to a Spanish-speaking attorney or paralegal. Issues of particular interest to the project are access to the court system for domestic violence victims, access to public benefits for the Latino/Hispanic community, housing conditions, employment problems, educational services, and consumer issues, including fraud in home purchases and predatory lending. Ms. Perez, a Mexican born resident, is the mother of three children. In addition to caring for her home and children, Ms. Perez works a full-time job. Ms Perez was married for more than twenty years to the father of her children. He was physically abusive to Ms. Perez throughout the marriage, but Ms. Perez tolerated the abuse in an effort to provide for her children and fulfill her 12 marital vows. In addition, Ms. Perez speaks very little English and she was apprehensive of the court system. In 2005, her husband threw her out of the marital home, which was in his name only. Later he criminally assaulted her. He was arrested and with assistance she obtained a protective order. He is a successful self-employed businessman, and under the protective order he was required to pay child support. However, because Mrs. Perez did not know how to prove her husband’s income, he was ordered to pay only a small amount. Due to the years of domestic violence that Ms. Perez suffered during the marriage, she was receiving mental health counseling from Caminar Latino, a non-profit Hispanic domestic violence victim counseling. At Caminar Latino, Mrs. Perez shared her anguish with a counselor, who then referred her to the Project. Subsequently, a Project attorney helped Ms. Perez obtain a divorce, a substantially higher amount of child support for her children, and a fair share of the equity in the marital home.
  • 15. Health Law Partnership The Health Law Partnership (HeLP) is an interdisciplinary community collaboration among Atlanta Legal Aid, Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Georgia State University College of Law. HeLP’s premise is that by combining the health care expertise of hospital professionals with the legal expertise of attorneys, we can provide a more holistic set of services to address the multiple factors affecting children’s health. The social and economic conditions in which children live can seriously affect their medical health. Attorneys intervene to address issues, such as poor housing conditions, domestic violence and violation of the legal rights of disabled children, with the goal of improving the physical, social or economic environments in which many children live. HeLP has on-site legal offices at Children’s Hospital at Scottish Rite and at Egleston. In addition to providing direct legal services to the families of low- income patients at Children’s, HeLP has created an interdisciplinary educational program about the legal, policy and ethical issues that affect children’s health.This program includes in-service education for health care professionals at Children’s as well as extern/clinic opportunities for students enrolled in professional graduate programs in law, medicine, nursing, social work and public health. In January 2007, the HeLP Legal Services Clinic at Georgia State University College of Law opened. It consists of a classroom component and the clinic itself, which handles cases referred to it by the main HeLP offices at the hospitals. Under the supervision of attorneys, law students assisted these HeLP clients with a variety of legal problems. HeLP also had law student externs from Emory University and a Public Health student extern from Georgia State University. 13 HeLP receives calls concerning all aspects of family law, education, Medicaid, disability issues and problems related to utilities. The attorneys have also assisted with problems related to housing, consumer issues, employment, health insurance and public benefits. Numerous volunteer attorneys assist us by handling some of these cases on a pro bono basis. Max’s wife died unexpectedly and left him to raise two daughters, one of whom is severely disabled. He was unable to work because he had no one to care for the disabled child. HeLP’s law clinic, located at Georgia State University College of Law, intervened to facilitate the application for home health care under the Mental Retardation Waiver Program. A home health care aide was secured for the child, and Max was able to return to his former employment. The clinic also assisted Max in the preparation of his will to ensure that in the event of his passing, an appropriate guardian would be appointed. The will also ensures that the inheritance of any assets would not jeopardize the disabled child’s eligibility for benefits.
  • 16. Home Defense Program The Home Defense Program (HDP) provides referrals and legal representation to low and moderate income homeowners victimized by home equity scams, including predatory mortgage lending. In 2007, HDP staff saw drastic increases in the numbers of mortgage delinquencies and foreclosures for homeowners who were made loans they could never afford. These mortgages are the basis for the current crisis in the mortgage industry and financial markets. HDP saved clients’ homes by negotiating cancellations of mortgage loans; restructuring of mortgage loans with substantially lower balances, interest rates, and monthly payments; and short payoffs of mortgage loans with reverse mortgages for senior homeowners. HDP director William J. Brennan and his clients were featured in national and local media, including the CNN series by Paula Zahn entitled “Debtor Nation: The Mortgage Mess,” and an article in The Wall Street Journal that described Bill’s strategy for saving senior homeowners from foreclosure by paying off predatory mortgages with substantially reduced payoffs using proceeds from reverse mortgages. Mrs. Miller, a senior citizen and long-time homeowner, obtained a $106,500 mortgage from a federally regulated subprime mortgage lender. Unknown to her, the mortgage had a balloon payment due at the end of the 30-year term. The monthly payments, plus a monthly allowance for property taxes and insurance, equaled more than 70% of her social security 14 retirement and pension income. The loan paid off a previous mortgage and gave her $2,850 in cash. However, she was charged $7,500 in closing costs that were financed as part of the loan. The inevitable happened: Mrs. Miller defaulted on the mortgage shortly after the loan closing, and she faced foreclosure and the loss of her home. She contacted Atlanta Legal Aid for legal assistance. Home Defense Program director Bill Brennan contacted the mortgage lender, raising legal claims and citing the FDIC Cease and Desist Order that had been issued against the lender because it was “making mortgage loans without adequately considering the borrower’s ability to repay the mortgage according to its terms.” After considerable negotiations, the mortgage company agreed to cancel the pending foreclosure sale and to accept a substantially reduced payoff of the mortgage using the proceeds of a reverse mortgage. The short payoff saved Mrs. Miller $54,375 and will ensure that she can continue living in her home without fear of foreclosure. In addition, some of the reverse mortgage proceeds will be used to repair her home. Under the terms of the reverse mortgage, Mrs. Miller has no mortgage payments and her only obligation is to maintain the home and to pay her property taxes and homeowners insurance premiums.
  • 17. Ombudsman The Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program continued its mission of protecting the welfare of the elderly, the physically and developmentally disabled and the mentally ill who reside in long-term care facilities. The program monitors more than 900 licensed and unlicensed personal care homes and 80 nursing homes in a 10-county region. Ombudsmen check for signs of abuse or neglect of residents through unannounced site visits and respond to complaints about these facilities filed by concerned staff, family and residents. The program employs 11 full- time staff and 43 volunteers. The Senior Citizens Law Project attorneys provide legal support and advice. The unannounced site visits are the foundation of the ombudsman’s work. The staff made 3,453 such visits in 2007.The ombudsman verifies that these facilities, whose populations range from one into the hundreds, offer safe, healthy and abuse-free environments for the residents. They also form relationships with the residents and their families, the facility staff and local law enforcement, whose help is often needed to address serious abuse issues. The ombudsman performed 57 trainings events and 70 community education sessions in 2007 on ways to recognize and report signs of abuse and neglect within the nursing homes and personal care homes. The program staff handled 1,133 abuse or neglect complaints from residents, staff and others in the community. 15 The ombudsman received a call from a county sheriff asking for assistance in locating an appropriate living situation for Mr. Peters, a homeless elderly man who had been arrested on a vagrancy charge. The ombudsman visited Mr. Peters at the detention center. He told her he had been living with his sister but she threw him out, so he found shelter in an old abandoned garage. Mr. Peters wasn’t able to tell the ombudsman if he had a source of income, but he did know his Social Security number and gave the ombudsman permission to investigate the possibility of his eligibility for benefits. The ombudsman called one of our volunteers who recently retired from the Social Security Administration and she agreed to investigate the man’s situation. The volunteer reported back to the staff that it would be necessary for someone to help him to correctly fill out an application because he was eligible for benefits The ombudsman called the sheriff who said his staff was not authorized to fill out the forms, so the ombudsman called Adult Protective Services. A worker there agreed to go to the jail and fill out the application. The ombudsman called a personal care homeowner who agreed to offer Mr. Peters lodging on the promise of receiving the Social Security check to pay for room and board. Several weeks later, the ombudsman visited Mr. Peters at the personal care home, where he was happy, safe and well fed.
  • 18. Mental Health and Disability Rights Project The Mental Health and Disability Rights Project has been providing advocacy to persons in state psychiatric facilities in the Metro Atlanta area for over 20 years and is supported by a staff of committed attorneys, paralegals, volunteers and interns. While the focus for our unit has always been enforcing the rights of persons with disabilities under the Americans with Disabilities Act, that focus expanded following the Supreme Court case that originated with our project, Olmstead v. L.C. & E.W. We currently offer services to those persons confined in state hospitals and nursing homes as well as those who have accessed community-based services but whose rights have been violated either through receipt of inadequate care or refusal of necessary services. This year, we have concentrated our advocacy on appropriate community services for the homeless mentally ill. Our work under contract with Georgia’s Protection and Advocacy System, the Georgia Advocacy Office, continued with advocates at hospitals in Atlanta, Savannah, Milledgeville and Rome. Our attorneys provided consulting services and training for these advocates in human rights, community placement and other services. We had a number of successful cases in 2007. For example, we filed a case on behalf of a client whose access to the administrative hearing process had been stalled when the state delayed in referring his hearing request to the Office of State Administrative Hearings (OSAH). The client, an institutionalized person with a disability, had been deprived his right to due process in his attempt to appeal a denial of community-based services. Our office was instrumental in getting the appeal request forwarded to OSAH and now hopes to move forward on the appeal. 16 Our attorneys were successful in obtaining a favorable judgment for a 31-year-old client who had been denied home-and- community-based services. The young woman has a history of developmental disorders but was denied services under the Mental Retardation Waiver Program, which provides services for individuals with mental retardation and developmental disabilities. This client has spent most of her life in institutional settings or foster care and has significant deficits in adaptive behavior. She requires assistance with many of her activities of daily living. The administrative law judge determined that our client had shown, through convincing evidence, that she qualified for the program services in question and reversed the state’s denial of services. This case is still pending agency review. Also this year, the Project was successful in negotiating a settlement with the state on behalf of two clients on ventilators who were at risk of nursing home placement outside the state of Georgia. One young man, a quadriplegic from a gymnastics accident, is attending college and skydives. The second young man, also a quadriplegic, suffers from muscular dystrophy. Both young men are seeking to live active lives. Institutional placement would have deprived them of this chance. Staff was able to convince the state that these clients could be served in the community and within appropriate budgetary guidelines.
  • 19. Senior Citizens Law Project The Senior Citizens Law Project (SCLP) provides legal representation to people over the age of 60. Although the project accepts clients regardless of their income, it gives highest priority to legal problems affecting low- income and homebound seniors. These problems often involve income and healthcare benefits, such as Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Medicaid and Medicare. SCLP also represents those who live in nursing homes and personal care homes, regardless of their age, on issues involving admission and discharge rights, as well as conditions of care in those facilities. Cases involving abuse, neglect, or financial exploitation of seniors are also given high priority. With the on-going rise in the cost of medical care for the elderly, and given the fact that senior citizens are the fastest-growing population group in the United States, the Senior Citizens Law Project continues to have a growing caseload. In 2007, SCLP served 603 clients. SCLP represented a 65-year-old client who was sued by a creditor for over $30,000 on a note signed by the client’s former son-in-law, allegedly acting as agent under a power of attorney for the client. This note and a second note were signed by the son-in-law for the purchase of his home. The senior did not sign any power of attorney authorizing the former son-in-law to sign the notes and other loan documents on her behalf. Prior to the lawsuit, the 17 property was sold at a foreclosure sale pursuant to the first note and security deed. A handwriting expert was retained to analyze the signatures on the power of attorney. The expert concluded that the client did not sign the power of attorney in question. The creditor then voluntarily dismissed the lawsuit.
  • 20. TeamChild Atlanta In its fifth year, TeamChild Atlanta continued to protect Atlanta’s at-risk youth from educational inequality and social injustice. TeamChild has focused on cutting off the school to prison pipeline, while developing its extensive network of community support to identify the unmet needs of Atlanta’s children and then to work towards fulfilling those needs. The project responds to two promi- nent issues within our client population: unfair school discipline and inappropriate denial of medical benefits. In addition to casework, TeamChild attorneys also train and supervise volunteer attorneys to represent youth with regards to these debilitating problems. TeamChild is dedicated to exposing these systemic issues one client at a time and to ensuring that these children are provided every opportunity to experience success. For children like Lisa, TeamChild has been the difference between success and failure. Lisa suffered from post- traumatic stress disorder and anxiety that rendered her unable to attend school. Lisa’s TeamChild attorney worked with her school to create a program that accommodates her disability, gradually exposing her to the environments that had been previously off limits for her. Instead of 18 being pushed to the sideliness due to disability, Lisa is thriving in a traditional high school setting. She is emerging both emotionally and educationally, working towards a high school diploma and successful independent living.
  • 21. Collaborative Technology Projects Atlanta Legal Aid Society and Georgia Legal Services Program have been engaged in a collaborative project to maintain two statewide websites to provide easy access to legal information for the public and to provide quick access to pro bono resources for volunteer lawyers across the state. LegalAid-GA.org LegalAid-GA.org is the statewide public access legal web site, providing over 1,000 resources to help Georgians understand their rights. The site offers: • information on rights and legal responsibilities in 18 different areas of the law; • access to court forms and documents; • referrals to lawyers who will provide free and low-cost legal help throughout the state; and • lists of the courts in each county. In 2007, the LegalAid-GA.org web site had almost 950,000 page views from 200,000 unique visitors. GeorgiaAdvocates.org In January 2004, Atlanta Legal Aid Society and Georgia Legal Services Program launched GeorgiaAdvocates.org, a password- protected web site for legal aid attorneys and private attorney volunteers, which provides the following resources: • a law library of legal training materials, basic pleadings and court forms for use in pro bono cases and other client advocacy • a news forum with poverty law news 19 • a calendar of events with information about continuing education opportunities, fundraisers and other events • a new volunteer opportunities for attorneys seeking pro bono work • a group listservs to enhance communication among legal task forces and volunteer attorneys. Since the initial launch, nearly 1,000 attorneys have joined the site.
  • 22. The Fellowship Program for Atlanta Associates The Fellowship Program began in 1995 when Alston & Bird committed an associate to work at Atlanta Legal Aid for four months. Since then, 17 Atlanta law firms have sent associates to Atlanta Legal Aid for periods of four to six months. Under the program, firms sponsor associates to work at one of Atlanta Legal Aid’s five offices. These associates continue to receive their salary and benefits from their firm and maintain office and library privileges there. Fellows are immersed in a variety of cases and crises, giving them valuable opportunities for court time and for responsibilities that only come much later at a large firm. Sponsoring law firms have learned that the Fellowship Program is one form of pro bono service that rewards them, as well as the recipient, in many ways. In the summer, United Parcel Service (UPS) sent Ryan Swift on a four-month fellowship to our Cobb office. Not only was Ryan our first Fellow from a corporate counsel’s office, he also is the first such Fellow ever to be sent by any corporate legal department to any legal aid program in the country. Ryan was also Atlanta Legal Aid’s fortieth Fellow. Summer Joseph Paige Stanley Marcia Bull Stadeker Shayne Clinton Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP Powell Goldstein LLP Dow Lohnes PLLC Smith, Gambrell & Russell, LLP 20 Susan Kalus Lillian Caudle Ryan Swift Amanda Patterson Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP Jones Day United Parcel Service Hunton & Williams LLP Travis Foust Caitlan Bannigan Ford & Harrison LLP Smith, Gambrell & Russell, LLP Skadden Arps Fellowship After graduating from Harvard Law School in June 2007, Sarah Bolling received a two-year Skadden Arps Fellowship to fund her work at Legal Aid’s Home Defense Project. The focus of her project is to represent low-income homeowners facing one of the most common predatory practices, lending without regard to repayment ability. Sarah’s project will also utilize bankruptcy court litigation as a tool for achieving stable homeownership.
  • 23. Volunteer Attorneys Each year Atlanta Legal Aid Society works closely with many volunteer attorneys who handle cases for low-income clients. With only one Legal Aid attorney for every 7,000 income-eligible clients in the five-county service area, these volunteers provide free legal services to many clients who would otherwise be turned away. Several of our specialty units have developed their own panels of volunteer lawyers. These are bar members with particular expertise or interest in the work of the unit. The AIDS Legal Project, the Home Defense Project, the Georgia Senior Legal Hotline and the Mental Health Law Project each have their own regular volunteers. Atlanta Legal Aid staff recruits and train these volunteers and provide continuing support for them. Legal Aid has developed formal ties with the bar in each of the five counties it serves. Volunteer attorneys extend free legal services to those in need, whose cases Atlanta Legal Aid cannot handle. • The Atlanta Volunteer Lawyers Foundation (AVLF) is an independent agency that provides services to thousands of low-income clients in Atlanta and Fulton County. AVLF can place with volunteers certain types of cases that Atlanta Legal Aid cannot handle because of lack of resources. AVLF arranges for volunteer lawyers to interview clients at the downtown office of Atlanta Legal Aid every Saturday morning. Each volunteer takes several cases, which have been pre-screened by Atlanta Legal Aid or AVLF staff. Atlanta Legal Aid staff attorneys serve as mentors and on-going contacts for the volunteers. Approximately 200 attorneys participate in this program. • The DeKalb Volunteer Lawyers Foundation (DVLF) is also an independent agency, serving low-income clients whom Atlanta Legal Aid cannot serve in DeKalb County. DVLF accepts referrals of clients with domestic relations cases, as well as a variety of other civil law problems. The staffs of the two programs work together to provide complementary services. 21 • The Cobb County Bar Association asks each of its members to volunteer or to contribute financially to support legal services to the poor. As a consequence, more than 100 Cobb lawyers volunteer to take at least one case per year from Atlanta Legal Aid’s Cobb office. Our Cobb County pro bono coordinator places appropriate cases with volunteers, monitoring how many cases each volunteer takes and how much time is spent on each one. Our legal staff screens the cases carefully before referral and then provides on-going support to each volunteer while the case is in progress. • Our Clayton County pro bono coordinator works out of the Southside office and in a small office in Forest Park. She maintains regular contact with Clayton County judges and bar leaders to protect and support Atlanta Legal Aid’s work. Our staff screens about 450 applications a year for the pro bono project. Each client is then placed with a volunteer attorney or a referral to appropriate services. • The Gwinnett County Bar Association supports volunteer efforts and provided our Gwinnett Pro Bono Coordinator with office space and equipment in the county courthouse until September 2003 when the new, full-service Gwinnett County office opened. Members of the bar now volunteer to accept individual cases screened by a part- time paralegal. The office also enjoys a regular volunteer who does legal research and other work as needed.
  • 24. PRO BONO Partnership Kilpatrick Stockton LLP Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project The pro bono partnership of Atlanta Legal Aid with Kilpatrick Stockton handles adoptions for the Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project, which is directed by Lindsay Verity. Kilpatrick Stockton volunteers, in addition to volunteers from other firms, expand the capacity of Atlanta Legal Aid’s staff and enable many more grandparents and other care-giving relatives to provide stable, loving homes for children whose parents cannot care for them. Troutman Sanders LLP and Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP Breast Cancer Project In 2007, Legal Aid began a pro bono partnership with Troutman Sanders to provide wills and advance directives for women with cancer. The project has another partner, the American Cancer Society, whose patient advocates refer clients to Haley Schwartz, director of the Breast Cancer Project at Legal Aid. She then prepares and refers appropriate clients to lawyers at the firm for representation. Another partnership was also started in 2007 with Sutherland Asbill & Brennan. The firm helps women with cancer obtain Social Security, SSI and Medicaid benefits by preparing their initial applications. Without help at these first stages, many of these applicants would be denied eligibility until they have a formal hearing with an administrative law judge, often years after they apply. 22 Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP Mental Health and Disability Rights Project Attorneys at Sutherland Asbill & Brennan have a long history of collaborating with Legal Aid in support of disability rights. In 2006, the firm began to fund a paralegal position at Legal Aid to investigate the cases of disabled persons in nursing homes who could live outside of the home, if proper community health care services were provided by the state. That position is now filled by Kathryn Wierville, who comes to Legal Aid with significant experience with children needing special education services. The firm has committed its attorneys to represent cases for these clients using the authority of Legal Aid’s U.S. Supreme Court victory in Olmstead v. E.W. and L.C. Sutherland’s support for the paralegal position is only its most recent collaboration with Legal Aid on behalf of clients with disability rights issues. Sutherland co-counseled with Legal Aid in the Olmstead litigation, and then supported a reverse fellowship for Legal Aid attorney Susan Walker Goico, which led to the filing of Birdsong v. Perdue, to implement Olmstead in nursing homes. King & Spalding and Troutman Sanders LLP Eviction Defense Project The Eviction Defense Project is a partnership between Atlanta Legal Aid and King & Spalding and Troutman Sanders. Attorneys from the firms represent clients in eviction hearings in Fulton County Magistrate Court twice weekly. The project took its first case in July 2001; in 2007 it handled over 40 cases. Many of the tenants whom these firms represented would otherwise not have had representation because of Atlanta Legal Aid’s limited resources. Maggie Kinnear, director of Atlanta Legal Aid Society’s Tenant Hotline, provides extensive preliminary training and continuing back-up assistance to the volunteers.
  • 25. 2007 Financial Data INCOME Legal Services Corporation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,502,000 Private Bar Campaign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,653,000 United Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 410,000 Atlanta Regional Commission. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 544,000 City of Atlanta Community Development/HUD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113,000 City of Atlanta/HOPWA/HUD. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136,000 Cobb County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236,000 Clayton County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68,000 DeKalb County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97,000 Fulton County. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38,000 Gwinnett County . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70,000 Georgia Bar Foundation (IOLTA). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 756,000 Equal Justice Works . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25,000 HeLP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195,000 Home Defense . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54,000 Ryan White . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86,000 Other AIDS Grants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13,000 VOCA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85,000 Senior Legal Hotline. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276,000 State Domestic Violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 513,000 Fulton Pro Se Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91,000 DeKalb Pro Se Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30,000 23 Foundations & Other Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 674,000 Interest Income. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,000 Endowment Contributions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,684,000 EXPENSES Personnel. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $7,310,000 Consulting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254,000 Travel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69,000 Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500,000 Supplies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 298,000 Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40,000 Insurance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35,000 Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27,000 Other (telephone, litigation, etc.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151,000 Total . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $8,684,000
  • 26. Sources of Support Atlanta Legal Aid Society receives its funding from a wide range of sources. These donors illustrate the broad base of support that we enjoy. Atlanta Legal Aid Society receives support from a wide variety of public sources, as well as from foundations in the Atlanta area and nationwide: • The federal Legal Services Corporation (LSC), our largest funding source, provided about 1/3 of last year’s income; • The Georgia Bar Foundation (IOLTA) provided support through funding of attorney salaries; • The Atlanta Regional Commission supported services to senior citizens through the Senior Citizens Law Project and the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. Fulton County also supported work for seniors in Fulton; • The State of Georgia funded the Georgia Senior Legal Hotline and supported our Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project; • The City of Atlanta, and DeKalb and Fulton counties supported housing work with Community Block Grant funds; • The Criminal Justice Coordinating Council funds ombudsman work through the Victim of Crimes Act (VOCA); • Clayton, Cobb and Gwinnett counties supported legal work in those counties while DeKalb and Fulton counties continued to fund the family law pro se clinics we operate in DeKalb and Fulton county courthouses; • HOPWA and Ryan White Care Act funded work with individuals living with HIV; • The United Way provided funds for programs to ensure housing stability; and • The State of Georgia funded programs to protect victims of domestic violence. Private foundations supported our work through specialized projects that target vulnerable populations. The Goizueta Foundation continued its multi-year support of the Hispanic Outreach Law Project. Komen for the Cure – Greater Atlanta provided generous funding for the Breast Cancer Legal Project. The Lettie Pate Evans Foundation and the Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta continued to support the Health Law Partnership (HeLP). The Atlanta Foundation provided funds for TeamChild Atlanta, and the American Bar Association through its Partnership in Law and Aging Program supported our development of automated public guardianship Hot Docs templates. Trinity Presbyterian Church continued 24 to support the Grandparent/Relative Caregivers Project, and Primerica/Citi Foundation again supported the housing work of Gwinnett Legal Aid. The Shirley Bolton Catastrophic Fund of The Community Foundation for Greater Atlanta renewed its support of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program. Foundations also proved generous in helping us expand and refurbish some of our outlying county offices. The Livingston Foundation, the Mary Allen Lindsey Branan Foundation, AEC Trust, and the David, Helen and Marian Woodward Fund provided capital support to expand our DeKalb County office facility. The Community Foundation for Northeast Georgia funded the expansion of the Family Law Center of Gwinnett Legal Aid.
  • 27. The 2007 Annual Campaign The Atlanta legal community is known throughout the nation for its support of the Atlanta Legal Aid Society. In fact, Atlanta ranks third behind the much larger markets of Boston and Los Angeles in terms of dollars raised from the private bar. J.D. Humphries, III of Stites & Harbison, a long-time campaign team solicitor and former chair of the board, led the 25th Annual Campaign. His team raised $1.5 million, continuing a twenty-five year streak of meeting the annual campaign goal. A team of experienced vice-chairs and solicitors, who called upon over 100 local firms, ably assisted the pair in this endeavor. These dedicated volunteers ensured the continuation of what has become Atlanta Legal Aid’s second largest funding source, comprising nearly 20% of the total annual budget. J.D. Humphries, III Stites & Harbison PLLC Chair, 2007 Annual Campaign 25 The Campaign Team Cathy A. Benton, Alston & Bird LLP Richard H. Deane, Jr., Jones Day Robert N. Dokson, Ellis Funk P.C. Edison Holland, Southern Company Michael T. Nations, Nations,Toman & McKnight Michael Stephens, Alston & Bird LLP William C. Thompson, Weissman, Nowack, Curry & Wilco, PC Amy Levin Weil, U.S. Attorney’s Office Solicitors Paul Baisier Paula Frederick Allison H. Lynch Roy E. Barnes Nathaniel Gozansky S. Wade Malone Tricia Bond Richard W. Hendrix Evan Pontz Frank O. Brown Robin Hensley Jonathan L. Rue Paul Cadenhead John C. Herman Dean W. Russell Vicki Carlton-Drake Philip Holladay, Jr. Natsu Saito Sherman A. Cohen William R. Jenkins John I. Spangler J. D. Dalbey Richard P. Kessler, Jr. Lisa Strauss Jonathan M. Fee Linda A. Klein Frank W.Virgin William H. Ferguson Weyman Johnson Ryan K. Walsh Jonathon A. Fligg Jack Williams
  • 28. Pacesetter Firms and Corporate Legal Departments (gifts of $400 per attorney) Alston & Bird LLP King & Spalding Arnall Golden Gregory LLP Kish & Lietz, P.C. Ashe, Rafuse & Hill, LLP Long & Holder, LLP AT&T Southeast Mary A. Miller & Associates Aussenberg Waggoner LLP Mayer & Beal Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC McKenna Long & Aldridge LLP Balch & Bingham LLP Morris, Manning & Martin, LLP The Barnes Law Group Nations, Toman & McKnight LLP Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore, LLP Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough, LLP Butler, Wooten & Fryhofer, LLP Northside Hospital Chilivis, Cochran, Larkins & Bever LLP Parker, Hudson, Rainer & Dobbs LLP Coca-Cola Company Worldwide Legal Division Paul, Hastings, Janofsky & Walker LLP DLA Piper Powell Goldstein LLP Doffermyre Shields Canfield Knowles & Devine, LLP Pursley Lowery Meeks LLP Dow Lohnes PLLC Rogers & Hardin LLP Fellows La Briola LLP Scherffius, Ballard, Still & Ayres, LLP Finch McCranie, LLP Smith, Gambrell & Russell, LLP Ford & Harrison LLP Stites & Harbison PLLC Georgia Power- A Southern Company Strickland Brockington Lewis LLP Gold Kist, Inc. Sutherland Asbill & Brennan LLP Goodman, McGuffey, Lindsey & Johnson, LLP Troutman Sanders LLP Holland & Knight LLP United Parcel Service Inc. Legal Department Hunton & Williams LLP Warshauer Poe & Thornton , P.C. Law Office of J. James Johnson Weinberg, Wheeler, Hudgins, Gunn & Dial, LLC Jenkins & Roberts, LLC Weissman, Nowack, Curry & Wilco, PC 26 Kidd & Vaughan LLP William H. Ferguson, P.C. Kilpatrick Stockton LLP Honor Roll Firms and Corporate Legal Departments ($200 per attorney) Beltran & Associates Hall Hirsh & McDaniel, LLC Carlton Fields Huff, Powell & Bailey LLC Chick-fil-A Jones Day Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. Mozley, Finlayson & Loggins Daniel D. Munster & Associates Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi L.L.P. Dorough & Dorough, LLC Schreeder, Wheeler & Flint LLP Ford & Barnhart, LLP Seyfarth Shaw Gary Flack & Associates, P.C. Supporter Firms and Corporate Legal Departments ($100 per attorney) Bowden Law Firm Miller & Martin LLP Edgar L. Crossett, III, P.C. Scoggins & Goodman, P.C Franzen and Salzano, PC Smith Moore LLP Hendrick Phillips Salzman & Flatt, PC Swift, Currie, McGhee & Hiers, LLP Kitchens Kelley Gaynes, P.C. Wagner, Johnston & Rosenthal
  • 29. Contributor Firms and Corporate Legal Departments (Less than $100 per attorney) Cohen & Caproni Hartman, Simmons, Spielman & Wood, LLP Cushing, Morris, Armbruster & Montgomery Hawkins & Parnell LLP Drew Eckl & Farnham, LLP King Grant & Associates, LLC Duane Morris LLP Ogletree, Deakins, Nash, Smoak & Stewart, PC Duncan & Adair, P.C. Weinstock & Scavo, P.C. Equifax Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice PLLC Vendors to the Legal Community President’s Circle ($2,500 or greater) Fulton County Daily Report Patron ($1,000- $2,499) Atlanta Association of Legal Administrators Pacesetter 27 ($500-$999) The Partners Group Rosing Painting & Wallcovering Contractors Individual Contributors E. Smythe Gambrell Fellows ($10,000-$24,999) Roy and Marie Barnes H. Stephen Harris Phillip A. Bradley and Cathy A. Harper Dorothy Y. Kirkley William H. Brewster Laura G. Thatcher Walter E. Jospin Joseph F. Haas Fellow ($7,500-$9,999) Jonathan Golden
  • 30. President’s Circle ($5,000-$7,499) Miles J. Alexander Stephanie B. Manis Joaquin R. Carbonell, III Angie F. Marshall John A. Chandler Philip J. Marzetti Paulette & Lawrence Fox John S. Pratt David H. Gambrell William H. Stanhope Philip E. Holladay, Jr. Jane F. Thorpe Patron ($2,500-$4,999) Pinny Allen John Izard R. Lawrence Ashe Myron Kramer Albert E. Bender John L.Latham Thomas C. Chubb Michael Tabachnick & Maureen Healy Steve Clay The One Sky Foundation Philip C. Cook Michael T. Petrik James L. Ewing W. Scott Petty Donald I. Hackney Dean W. Russell H. Douglas Hinson Bernard Taylor Allen Hirsch William C. Thompson John Hopkins & Laurie House 28 Trendsetter ($1,000-$2,499) John M. Allan Deborah S. Ebel Beverly B. Martin Joel Arogeti Jonathan M. Fee R. Matthew Martin Richard M. Asbill David H. Fink Karol V. Mason Jesse H. Austin Peter A. Fozzard James McAlpin Shannon Baxter Elliott Goldstein Mara McRae James F. Bogan Charles L. Gregory Chris D. Molen William H. Boice Jane M. Haverty George L. Murphy Wayne N. Bradley Richard R. Hays Michael T. Nations Arthur D. Brannan Catherine M. Hilton E. Penn Nicholson Cassaday Brewer Rebecca A. Hoelting John L. North Kenneth F. Britt Stephen E. Hudson James A. Orr Daryl R. Buffenstein Randall L. Hughes John G. Parker Marian Burge W. Stell Huie Steven A. Pepper Randall J. Cadenhead Weyman T. Johnson Michael J. Perry Peter C. Canfield John R. Jones W. Ray Persons Richard R. Cheatham Sandra C. Jones Patsy Y. Porter Thomas W. Curvin Donald Kennicott Kurt A. Powell William V. Custer Dorothy Y. Kirkley John S. Pratt Leslie A. Dent Edmund M. Kneisel Paul Quiros B. Knox Dobbins J. Allen Maines Michael W. Rafter Robert N. Dokson S. Wade Malone William M. Ragland William S. Duffey George T. Manning Ronald Raider J. Matthew Dwyer Deborah A. Marlowe Richard L. Robbins Jason Eakes John T. Marshall Robert L. Rothman
  • 31. Neil C. Schemm David A. Stockton Michael Weinstock Mary Jo Schrade Randolph W. Thrower William K. Whitner Charles T. Sharbaugh Robert M. Travis R. Mark Williamson Rita A. Sheffey Mark S.VanderBroek Thomas P. Wilson John F. Simon John A. Wallace Jeffrey E.Young Alexander W. Smith Jill Warner Charles J.Yovino Roy Sobelson David A. Webster David M. Zacks Caroline W. Spangenberg Amy Levin Weil Benefactor ($750-$999) Paul M. Baisier Avarita L. Hanson E. Gordon Robinson Gaylen D. Baxter Paul M. Hawkins Tonia C. Sellers Gerrilyn G. Brill Riccarda N. Heising Charles W. Surasky V. Robert Denham J. Scott Jacobson Terry Walsh Paul and Lisa V. Gianneschi Judith A. O’Brien Jack F. Williams Thomas W. Rhodes Pacesetter ($400-$749; $200 for public-interest employees) Frank S. Alexander James A. Demetry Harry C. Howard Kent B. Alexander Ronnie E. Dixon R. Dale Hughes 29 Paul H. Anderson, Jr. John L. Douglas Lawrence Humphrey W.Tinley Anderson Steven S. Dunlevie Deborah A. Johnson Anthony B. Askew William A. Edmundson Chuck Jones Joseph R. Bankoff Michael Elkon Megan Kelly Sheila Baran Martin L. Ellin Richard P. Kessler Lilia U. Bell Anne S. Emanuel Dow N. Kirkpatrick Donna P. Bergeson Jack P. Etheridge W. Thomas King Brooks Binder Philip F. Etheridge William H. Kitchens William Q. Bird Marion Franklin Lawrence P. Klamon Matthew Block Paula J. Frederick Kenneth A. Klatt Steven E. Blumenthal Anna Burdeshaw Fretwell Michael P. & Chari Kornheiser Tammy Alice Bouchelle Lesli Gaither Michael Kovaka Thomas A. Bowman Christopher P. Galanek Noelle Lagueux-Alvarez Karen Boyles E. Reid Garrett Frank A. Landgraff James L. Bross William J. Gillis Mark S. Lange Marian Burge Judson Graves Nancy F. Lawler Matthew J. Calvert C. Christopher Hagy H. Franklin Layson Peter C. Canfield Ryan E. Harden Rebecca A. Littleton Mark Carter Jill Harrison Ginny Looney Thomas MacIver Clyde Peter V. Hasbrouck Deborah A. Marlowe Peter D. Coffman Michael D. Haun Jason S. McCarter Steven M. Collins Paul M. Hawkins Darla McKenzie Leah G. Cooper Robin M. Hensley Amy McMorrow Everett N. Crandell Sharon N. Hill Andrew A. Merdek Terrence Lee Croft Corey Hirokawa Elizabeth Ann Morgan Peter S. Dardi L. Lynn Hogue Elizabeth Noe Cindy J.K. Davis Phyllis J. Holmen Michael Novosel
  • 32. Cody Partin Robert A. Schapiro Natalie Suhl Reinaldo Pascual Arthur J. Schwartz James J. Swartz Albert M. Pearson W. Andrew Scott Virginia S. Taylor Thomas J. Peters Debbie Segal Lori Thomas Laurance D. Pless Kyle D. Sherman Frank W.Virgin Janette B. Pratt Paul R. Shlanta L. Kent Webb Polly J. Price Frank Slover C. Geoffrey Weirich Jill Pryor Douglas A. Smith Robert G. Wellon Mary Francis Radford Randall R. Smith Melody Wilder Michael W. Rafter Suzanne Smith Richard A. Wilhelm Howard Rothbloom Marcia Bull Stadeker Beth D. Wilkinson Jacquelyn H. Saylor Margaret Witten Supporter ($100-$399) Lynn Adam Fredric Chaiken John H. Fleming Laura N. Akerman Samuel M. Chambliss Richard D. Flexner Aaron Alembik Michael C. Cherof Jonathon Fligg Jessica Anderson Stan Chervin Warren C. Fortson Clare Arguedas Michael Cicero John Fortuna Karol Smith Armwood Sheandra R. Clark Dorothy B. Franzoni Kelly Atkinson Alexander Clay Stepehn A. Friedman Caitlin Bannigan Sherman A. Cohen Robert E. Freyre Louis Barbieri Halli D. Cohn Eric J. Frisch Peter Barlow Roberta Collins Jonathan Gallant 30 Robert A. Barnes Charlotte A. Combre Katherine R. Gauntt Donna G. Barwick Kevin Conboy Ira Genberg William R. Bassett Randall A. Constantine John J. Goger Shannon Baxter Joseph L. Cooley Robert F. Goodman T. Jackson Bedford Karen Cooper Sanford Gottlieb Hubert J. Bell & Eileen Crowley Bruce I. Crabtree Nathaniel E. Gozansky Donald C. Beskin Donald Crosby Kevin Charles Greene Francis M. Bird Christiane Daly Ralph H. Greil Bennie H. Black Hugh M. Davenport Janice C. Griffith Evan Black Gilbert H. Davis Alan Hamilton A. J. Block William D. DeGolian Stephanie Hansen Robert A. Boas James M. Deichert David J. Harris Dwight Bowen Jolynn Demeritte James A. Hatcher Jennifer Bradford John G. Despriet Paul M. Hawkins Terry C. Bridges Gregory J. Digel Nathan P. Hendon Louann Bronstein Daniel Drahushuk Sharon Butterworth Hermann Scott P. Brown Alex Drummond Daniel Hinkel Jamie M. Brownlee Steven S. Dunlevie David Hobson W. Wheeler Bryan Robert G. Edge Richard B. Holcomb Allen Buckley Michael J. Egan Thomas and Marsha Holcomb Joseph Burnett Margaret P. Eisenhauer Latasha R. Holland Mark G. Burnette Erin Elliot Arthur Howell Nora Kalb Bushfield A. James Elliott R. William Ide G. Brian Butler Marcia M. Ernst C. Walker Ingraham Sylvia Caley Guanming Fang David M. Jarret Brian & Genia Cayce Martha J. Fessenden Megan Johnson
  • 33. Baxter P. Jones Matthew G. Moffett Karen W. Shelton W. Seaborn Jones Christine M. Morgan Arnold B. Sidman Jeffrey and Janet Joseph Joe Morris Nat G. Slaughter LarryKahn Patricia Mosley Frank Slover Gary M. Kazin J. Arthur Mozley Thomas E. Smith Kirk W. Keene Tiana Scogin Mykkeltvedt Brian Gary Smooke Yoon J. Kim L. Nelson Thaddeus Sobieski Janet F. King Catherine O’Neil Kathryn B. Solley Seth D. Kirschenbaum Mary Ann B. Oakley Thomas Spillman Jeff S. Klein Jennifer D. Odom Alicia Starkman Leslie P. Klemperer Latif Oduola-Owoo Mason W. Stephenson Amy Arnett Knoespel Robert I. Paller Candace Stevens Marjorie Fine Knowles Mary A. Palma Lisa Strauss Lynn Stapleton Koch Covert Parnell A. Thomas Stubbs Harvey M. Koenig Stephen M. Paskoff Debra Sydnor Rita J. Kummer Craig Pendergrast Caroline Johnson Tanner Victor M. Lai Hugh Peterson Susan M. Thompson Thomas P. Lauth Steven L. Pottle Michael W. Tittsworth Cheryl Legare Annette T. Quinn Glee A. Triplett Jay J. Levin Stephen Quirk Jimmy Turner Jim and Joyce Gist Lewis Kaveh Rashidi-Yazd Stacey D. Turner Frank A. Lightmas Thompson T. Rawls Shunta Vincent Randall M. Lipshutz Anne M. Rector Candice Voticky Sara Loft Kim Reddy Eric Wachter Frank Love. Jr. Amanda Morton Redick Christopher A. Wagner Dennis Gary Lovell Samantha Rein R. Christina Wall Thomas C. Lundin Nancy F. Reynolds Peter H. Ward Tadas Macas Melody Z. Richardson Stanley F. Wasowski 31 Morris W. Macey Thomas S. Richey Jonathan Wax Kim Marchner Joycia C. Ricks Antavius Weems Celeste McCollough Eliot W. Robinson Kevin Weimer Dan McGrew Valerie Rusk Sara Kathryn Wellman Steven L. McKay David Rusnak John L. Westmoreland Jane S. McMillan Jay Sadd Gregory Wheeler Sandra Michaels Caroline Sage Charles Whitney Clare Michaud Parker Sanders Jennifer M. Winsberg Rebecca S. Mick David W. Santi James P. Wolf Janise L. Miller Mary Schoeffler Kevin R. Wolff Jennifer M. Miller Jennifer S. Schumacher John F. Wymer M.Yvette Miller Dale M. Schwartz Key Wynn Richard W. Miller Randall B. Scoggins SJ Zealey Simon A. Miller Ashley Sexton Daniel Zegura Thomas Mimms Mark A. Shaffer Peter Zeliff Richard C. Mitchell Sarah Shalf Scott Zweigel Ann Moceyunas Stanton Shapiro Jodi Zysek Susan L. Shaver
  • 34. Contributor (less than $100) Harold E. Abrams Scott A. Halpern Brent A. Neiman David Adams Hillard Hardman Lawrence H. Neville Jamie Aliperti Mark D. Harris Catherine J. North Jeff Allen Bernadette Hartfield Lynne R. O’Brien Paul Arne James Hatten Kent Ohlsen Enjolique Dion Aytch Peter Hay Carolyn Owens Shakara Barnes Coulter C. Henry Robert Ozols Susan Barnes Virginia L. Henry Elena Parent Nancy Baumgarten Angela R. Herritt Steve Park Jane Berlin Laina Hertz Jason M. Pass Christopher C. Bly Elizabeth M. Hesmer William J. Piercy Kimberly Boler Tiffani Hiudt Brad Resweber Lindsay Bowen Sylvia Hoard Beth Richardson Chris Bowers Amy Hutcheson Michele A. Ritz Eugene Bryant John Isbell Madison Robert Thomas G. Burch Christine P. James Jennifer D. Roorbach Delores Burns Alicia Jefferson Suzan E. Roth Alyssa Carducci Elizabeth Johnson Mustufa Salehbhai Michelle Carter Richard E. Johnson Eric R. Sender Shiriki Cavitt Jonathan Jordan Toysha Sharpe Carolyn L. Clark Josh Katz Livia Shephard Debra Connelly Jenifer Keenan Scott Sherman Joseph L. Cooley Christopher Kellen Heather Shirley Suzette Corley Vincent Kelly Douglas A. Smith Stacy S. Crane Wai Keung Kristine M. Smith 32 Matt Cristy Todd F. Kimbrough Emily E. Smith-Purcell Nikole M. Crow J. Ed Kirkland E. Lee Southwell Jennifer D’Angelo Lisa Knottek Vanessa Spencer Kristy Daniels Dominic Kouffman Matthew Spivey Mark S. Davis Margaret Kroening James E. and Linda Sproull Daniel Diffley Albert L. Labovitz Siorhon Stanton Andrew Durden Patrick L. Lail Jaliya Stewart Michael Eckard Jennifer Lambert Susan Stoppelman Roslyn Falk R. O. Lerer John R. Strother, Jr. Amir R. Farokhi Ralph B. Levy Richard S. Strouse Nick Farrell Blaine Lindsey Thuy Vu Taitt Clinton Fletcher Robert J. Lipshutz Issac Tekie Margaret C. Franklin Kimberly Loeb Julie Tennyson Paula J. Frederick Lindsay Marks Jaime Theriot Carla J. Friend Charles A. Marvin Sara Tucker Eric J. Frisch Todd Maziar Christian Turner Judith Fuller Tom Mazziotti Rosemary K. Underwood Colin Garrett Shlonda McCrimmon James Valbrun Elizabeth Garrett Theresa McDaniel Raye Ann Viers Benjamin Gastel Monique McDowell Shunta Vincent Robert Gerwig Stacey McGavin Ronit Z. Walker James Goldberg Lynette McNeil Thomas R. Walker Christina Graham Megan L. Miller Ryan K. Walsh Stefanie D. Grant Rosemarie Morse James M. Walters Ed Grenvicz Jamie Muscar Laura Wartner Alison Grounds Elena M. Mushkin Peter Werdesheim
  • 35. Constance A. White William T. Wood Robert A. Wys James P. Wolf Drew Wooldridge Jason Yost Justin A. Wood Benjamin Young In Tribute HeLP Project John Warchol & Marc Johns Charles Schwab & Co., Inc. Nancy Mansfield Weston Solutions, Inc. Judith O’Brien Mr. & Mrs. Gavin Appleby Lisa McRae Sylvester P. Macasieb, Jr. Howard Rhodes Debra Bernes Thomas Chorey Sherry Seidman Haley Schwartz Theron & Marjorie Bradford Don Gieske Frank Bradford Danny Reed 33 William J. Brennan Stephen Toth Charles F. Hicks Dorothy T. Beasley Declan Joseph Coyne Susan Stoppelman Ralph Hicks R. Lawrence Ashe, Jr. Rick D. Blumen Forrest M. & Cynthia D. Brown Nickolas P. Chilivis G. Douglas Dillard Teresa B. Sanford Jay A. & Andrea Shapiro Carter & Laura Smith
  • 36. Officers and Board of Directors Executive Committee Michael T. Nations, President Robert N. Dokson, First Vice President Teri Plummer McClure, Second Vice President Matthew J. Calvert, Secretary/Treasurer Philip E. Holladay, Jr., Immediate Past President Rita A. Sheffey Judith A. O’Brien William R. Jenkins Maggie Moody Beverly Slädek, Sterling F. Singleton Board of Directors Mark E. Budnitz Alicia Pabón Mattie Christian Albert M. Pearson, III Betty Doché Kathlynn Butler Polvino Jonathan M. Fee Michael W. Rafter Charles L. Gregory Howard Rothbloom Rick Horder, Barbara Rouse Annie Johnson Lisa R. Strauss 34 Allegra J. Lawrence-Hardy Mark S.VanderBroek S. Wade Malone Alfredia Webb Sandra Matthews Elsie Williams John Munzenmeier Advisory Committee Paul M. Baisier Dawn Jones Marianna Batie Kenneth A. Klatt Gaylen Kemp Baxter Myron N. Kramer Louann Bronstein Carol McCarll Thomas C. Chubb, III Kirtan Patel Naeemah Clark Judge Patsy Y. Porter Richard H. Deane, Jr. Bradley Wilkes Pratt Leslie Eason Tina Shadix Roddenbery Linda Felix Dean W. Russell Ruth Fife Catherine Salinas Jonathon A. Fligg Debra A. Segal Robin M. Hensley William Stanhope Daniel James Huff William C. Thompson Randall L. Hughes Ryan Walsh Weyman T. Johnson, Jr. LaTonya T. Washington Bryan Jones Pamela R. Wilson
  • 37. Staff (as of December 31st, 2007) Administrative Unit Steven Gottlieb, Executive director Marian Burge, Deputy director Charles R. Bliss, Director of advocacy David Webster, General counsel Kristin Verrill, HotDocs developer Tami Anderson, Librarian Vinicius Andrade, Information systems assistant Donald Carder, Information systems manager Everett Crandell, Business manager Elaine Landry, Financial manager Phyllis McKay, Director’s asistant/webmaster Resource Development Center Angela Tacker, Director of communications and annual giving Jan Heidrich-Rice, Grants manager Paula Lawton Bevington, Planned giving consultant Telephone and Reception 35 Chelsea Belcher, Receptionist/intake Elaine Wyms, Intake secretary Downtown General Law Anne Bunton Carder, Managing attorney Kevin Anderson, Attorney Kimberly Charles, Attorney Craig Goodmark, Attorney/TeamChild director Margaret Hayman, Attorney Shirley Bailey, Reception staff supervisor/legal secretary Tenant Hotline Margaret Kinnear, Attorney/Tenant Hotline coordinator James Goldberg, Attorney
  • 38. Downtown Family Law Michelle Jordan, Managing attorney Megan Miller, Attorney Jodi Mount, Attorney Lindsay Verity, Attorney, director, Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project Stacy Sax, Attorney, Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project Joquita Etchison, Intake paralegal Jesusita Bolton, Legal Assistant to Grandparent/Relative Caregiver Project Alicia Williams, Legal secretary Claybon Wicks, Intake receptionist AIDS Legal Project/ALS & Cancer Legal Initiative John Warchol, Managing attorney Martha FinemanSowers, Attorney Marcus Johns, Attorney Stacy A. Sax, Attorney Haley Schwartz, Attorney/Breast Cancer Legal Project Marya Cosby, Support staff/paralegal Elaine Wyms, Legal secretary Senior Citizens Law Project 36 Stephen Krumm, Managing attorney Stacey Hillock, Attorney Donald Horace, Attorney Stacy Reynolds, Attorney Erin Shear, Attorney Jennifer Staack, Attorney Bomani Bokari, Paralegal/investigator Jesusita Bolton, Legal assistant Georgia Senior Legal Hotline Cheri Tipton, Managing attorney Don Calder, Attorney James Doyle, Volunteer attorney Elsie Draper, Volunteer attorney Dina Franch, Attorney Alisa Haber, Attorney Randy Hughes, Volunteer attorney Kim Raymond, Attorney Mary B. Winkeljohn, Attorney Carol Roberts, Reception
  • 39. South Fulton/Clayton County Office Jamie Aliperti, Managing attorney Summer Joseph, Attorney Michael Waller, Attorney C. Talley Wells, Attorney Pamela Hampton, Clayton County pro bono coordinator Mickey Williams, Clayton County consultant paralegal Norma Antonio de la Garza Garcia, Bilingual outreach paralegal Juanita Hodges, Legal secretary/receptionist Donna Simmons, Legal secretary/receptionist Clayton County Pro Bono Project Pamela Hampton, Pro bono coordinator Micky Williams, Consultant to pro bono program Cobb County Legal Aid Catherine Vandenberg, Managing attorney Sheila Chrzan, Attorney Dawn Edwards, Attorney Kate M Gaffney, Attorney Katie Helton, Attorney 37 Jacqueline Payne, Supervising attorney Hon. Hugh Robinson, Bankruptcy screening attorney Silvia SantanaMejia, Bilingual intake paralegal Susan Belcher, Office administrative assistant Patricia Marbry, Legal secretary Sophia Nicole Smith, Intake receptionist Cobb Justice Foundation Sarah Cipperly, Attorney, Cobb Justice Foundation coordinator Susan Belcher, Cobb Justice Foundation intake receptionist Gwinnett County Legal Aid Roshonda Davis-Baugh, Managing attorney Andrea Espie, Attorney Rachel Lazarus, Attorney Anne Marie Lugo, Attorney Hee Ryu, Attorney Debbie Ennis, Paralegal Sandra Alvis, Office administrator/legal secretary Tycka Winfrey, Receptionist/secretary
  • 40. Health Law Partnership Bridget Beier, Office manager Taniya Sarkar, Attorney DeKalb County Office Donald Coleman, Comanaging attorney Deborah Johnson, Comanaging attorney Karyl Davis, Attorney Elizabeth Ann Guerrant, Attorney Karen Moskowitz, Attorney Elena Mushkin, Attorney Angela Riccetti, Attorney Will Power, Administrative casehandling paralegal Lillie Preston, Paralegal/ intake receptionist Ruth Wanner, Legal secretary/office administrative assistant Tahira Hughs Catlett Bey, Legal secretary Charlotte Davis, Legal secretary Veronica Thompson, Intake receptionist Claybon Wicks, Administrative assistant Home Defense Project 38 Bill Brennan, Project director Karen Brown, Attorney Sarah Bolling, Skadden Arps fellow Nancy MacLeod, Paralegal Sandra Scott, Paralegal Mental Health and Disability Rights Unit Sue Jamieson, Project director Susan Walker Goico, Attorney Susan Kalus, Attorney Toni Pastore, Paralegal/unit manager Kathryn Wierville, Paralegal LaNita Seymour, Social worker Hispanic Outreach Law Project Don Coleman, Outreach director Yazmin Sobh, Attorney Maria Puché, Paralegal Mayra Rubio, Hotline intake paralegal
  • 41. Long-term Care Ombudsman Program Karen Boyles, Program manager Florence Boehm, Ombudsman Marsha Bond, Ombudsman Roberta Collins, Ombudsman Laura Formby, Ombudsman Monica GrahamClark, Ombudsman Valecia Jackson, Ombudsman Nicole McGarity, Ombudsman Lisa Moore, Ombudsman Vickie Seitman, Ombudsman, volunteer coordinator Carolyn Young, Ombudsman Roseanne Glick, Administrative assistant, intake paralegal Tamara Madison, Data entry/secretary/receptionist 39
  • 42. 40
  • 43. Atlanta Legal Aid Society, Inc. www.atlantalegalaid.org