INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN Course Outline - SEMESTER3_2014
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INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN Course Outline - SEMESTER3_2014

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UTT Instructional Design Course Outline

UTT Instructional Design Course Outline

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    INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN Course Outline - SEMESTER3_2014 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN Course Outline - SEMESTER3_2014 Document Transcript

    • COURSE OUTLINE COURSE CODE: IDES2001 COURSE TITLE: Instructional Design COURSE LEVEL: Undergraduate 2013-2014 TRIMESTER:lll HOURS PER WEEK: 3 TOTAL HOURS: CREDITS: 3 START DATE: June 2014 END DATE: July 2014 PREREQUISITES:: Educational Technology COURSE COORDINATOR: Dr. Lionel Douglas Phone: Office: Other: 741-5450 Office Hours: Email: ldouglas2010@gmail.com INSTRUCTORS: Ms A-A Wilson ayles-anne.wilson@utt.edu.tt Ms L Roberts 642-8888 ext 29138 leesha.roberts@utt.edu.tt Ms P Bascombe-Fletcher p.bascombefletcher@yahoo.com Mr R Birbal rbirbal@gmail.com Mrs Sherry-Anne Rollocks- Hackett Twp2000@tstt.net.tt RECOMMENDED TEXTS  Designing Effective Instruction by Morrison Ross Kemp and Kalman  Principles of Instructional Design by Gagne, Wager, Kolas and Keller (5th Ed) SCHOOL FOR STUDIES IN LEARNING COGNITION AND EDUCATION
    • 2 COURSE DESCRIPTION This course seeks to develop in the student knowledge, skills and competencies in the use of instructional design theories and models. The course provides opportunity for the application of the knowledge gained. With a strong knowledge of instructional design the teacher becomes not just a delivery vehicle for instruction but also a contributor in determining how best to provide for and facilitate the learning of the student. . COURSE GOALS The purpose of this course is to introduce students to instructional design theories and models and to enable them to apply the theories and utilize the models to design and develop educational materials. LEARNING OUTCOMES At the end of this course participants will be able to design educational experiences utilizing various instructional design models and instructional and learning theories. METHODS OF INSTRUCTION This course adopts a learner-centred approach to teaching, rather than the traditional teacher- centred, pedagogical approach that emphasizes lecturing. Students are, therefore, required to read widely in order to actively construct and discover their own knowledge. For the duration of this course, the instructor’s primary role is to facilitate and guide the teaching/learning process. Some of the instructional activities will include debates, group discussions, seminars and workshop sessions. Evaluation The course is evaluated as follows: 1. One Group Project 50 Marks 2. One Exam 50 Marks Your Group Project Topic shall be determined in collaboration with your lecturer.
    • 3 1. Project Units You will form yourself into groups of 4 – 5 persons. You will select a project topic which must be confirmed by your Lecturer. You will now complete an Instructional Design for this project which will comprise the following deliverables: 1. Analysis 15 Marks a. Instructional Problem (5) b. Context (5) c. Content (5) 2. Design 10 Marks a. Objectives (5) b. Strategies (5) 3. Development 30 Marks a. Assessment Plan (5) b. Implementation Plan (5) c. One Lesson Plan (5) 4. Project Presentation 10 Marks a. Identification (2) b. Structure, Layout (2) c. Spelling and Grammar (2) d. Timeliness (2) e. APA (2) NB: The total marks for the project is 65. However the project is worth 50 marks. Therefore your marks will be pro-rated out of 50. 2. Examination Question Your examination will assess your ability to do an Instructional Design. COURSE CONTENT 1. Theories and Models Week 1 Rationale The design and development of instruction is governed and influenced by theories and models. When there are no known models, theories can be used to guide practice. Similarly when there are no known theories if models are available they can be used to guide practice. However there are
    • 4 limitations with models and theories. The effectiveness of the Instructional Designer depends on his/her ability to apply and utilize available theories and models. Content 1. Theories and Models a. What is a Theory b. What is a Model c. How are they different d. What is Instructional Design e. What is an Instructional Design Theory f. What is an instructional Design Model 2. Instructional Design Theories a. Learning Theories i. Information Processing Theory (Miller, 1956) ii. Dale’s Cone of Learning iii. Multiple Intelligences (H. Gardner) (Gardner, 1983) iv. The Educational Theory of Jerome Bruner (Bruner, 1915) v. Model of School Learning (Caroll, 1963) vi. Cooperative and Collaborative Learning vii. Social Learning Theory (Bandura, 1977) viii. Conditions of Learning (Gagne, 1965) ix. Social Development Theory (Vygotsky, 1978) x. Advanced Organizers (Ausubel, 1960) b. Instructional Theories i. Elaboration Theory (Reigeluth, 1970) ii. Gagne’s Nine Events of Instruction iii. Cognitive Apprenticeship (Collins, Brown and Newman) iv. Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives v. Adult Learning (Cross, 1981) vi. Mastery Learning (Bloom) vii. Situated Learning (Lave, 1988) viii. Conversation Theory (Pask, 1975) c. Motivational Theories and their application to teaching and learning i. Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs (Maslow, 1943) ii. ARC’s Motivation Theory (Keller, 1983) iii. Expectancy Theory (Vroom, 1964) iv. Equity Theory v. Herzberg Two-Factor Theory d. Communication Theories and their application to teaching and learning i. Attribution Theory ii. Cognitive Dissonance theory iii. Social Identity Theory iv. Uncertainty Reduction Theory v. Social Penetration Theory vi. Social Exchange Theory vii. Elaboration Likelihood Model e. General Systems Theories
    • 5 3. Design Models i. ADDIE ii. Morrison, Ross and Kemp iii. ASSURE iv. Dick and Carey Instructional Design ADDIE Analysis 2. Instructional Problem / Context / Content Weeks 2 & 3 Rationale ID Models provide guidance for instructional designers in designing instructional lessons. Models may be classified in different groups. Familiarity with the different models, their strengths and weaknesses will enable designers to choose and apply the most appropriate models for specific learning situations. We will use the ADDIE model in conjunction with the Morrison Ross Kemp and Kalman Model as the base models and introduce the students to other models identifying similarities and differences. Content 2.1 Instructional Problem Rationale The purpose of determining the Instructional Problem is for the student to be able to determine what the instructional need of the audience is. Objective At the end of this lesson given a situation of non-performance or a situation where performance is affected by lack of skills, knowledge or competencies, participants will be able to develop an instructional problem statement. 2.1.1 Identify the Topic 2.1.2 Identify the Audience 2.1.3 Outline all the skills, knowledge and competencies that are lacking. 2.1.4 Summarize and formulate into one complete instructional problem.
    • 6 Example of Problem Statement Grade 9 Students are not able to distinguish Adjectives from Adverbs. They normally misuse them or use them interchangeably. This course is designed to provide students with the skills to enable them to distinguish and correctly use adverbs and adjectives in sentences. Rubric for Instructional Problem 2 1 0 Topic or subject area Is it an Instructional Problem Incompetency Identified Major subordinate skills, Instructional Problem should comprise Target Audience What they cannot do The reason they cannot do it What the instruction will enable them to do. Clear and Unambiguous Is it solvable by teaching A complete sentence expressing incompetence Sub Skills identified Stated Stated Stated Stated Stated but Not clear or ambiguous Not a Sentence or does not express incompetence Not Given It is not Solvable by teaching Not a Sentence or does not express incompetence Sub skills not identified Not Stated Not Stated Not Stated Not Stated Final Mark is Total Mark divided by 16 Multiplied by 5 E.g. If the student made 12 final marks is 12/16 by 5 = 3.75
    • 7 2.2 Context Analysis Rationale The context refers to all the attending variables that may impact on instruction and learning, it may be the environment, learner attitude or capability or instructor’s competence. A context analysis is important in order for the designer to know what problems s/he may have to over come and enable him/her to develop strategies to deal with them. Objective At the end of this, given an instructional problem the student will be able to collect relevant information about the context of the problem and write a complete description of the audience and the environment. 2.2.1 Audience 2.2.1.1 General Characteristics 2.2.1.2 Entry Competencies 2.2.1.3 Academic Background 2.2.1.4 Social Characteristics 2.2.1.5 Learning Styles 2.2.2 Environment 2.2.2.1 Orienting Context 2.2.2.1.1 What goals should the learner have 2.2.2.1.2 What perception of Utility should they possess 2.2.2.1.3 What perception of accountability should they have 2.2.2.2 Instructional Context 2.2.2.2.1 What physical conditions in the environment are required 2.2.2.3 Transfer Context 2.2.2.3.1 What tools, resources, opportunity and support do they need Evaluation Context Analysis Complete the context analysis for your project Rubric. For Context Analysis Context Analysis Report Audience General Characteristics Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Entry Competencies Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Academic Background Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Social Characteristics Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Learning Styles Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Environment Orienting Context Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5
    • 8 Instructional Context Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Transfer Context Present and Clearly defined 1 - 5 Reading and Research  Morrison Ross and Kemp – Audience Analysis  EPSSID – Learn About  Task Analysis (TA) 2.3 Content Analysis Rationale Content analysis is required in order to ensure that all information required for the achievement of mastery of the subject matter is contained in the course of study. If content is omitted or ignored it is possible for the student or teacher to not achieve the required objectives. Not only must the designer understand the composite topics in the content but the designer must also know and understand the level at which the learner is expected to gain mastery of the content There are several Taxonomies used to describe content. Objectives Students will be able to develop complete content that will contain all information that is required for mastery of the subject matter. Content 6.1Facts or Verbal information 6.2Concepts 6.3Principles and Rules 6.4Procedures Research:  http://maxweber.hunter.cuny.edu/pub/eres/EDSPC715_MCINTYRE/TaskAnalysis.html  Content Analysis Chapter in Morrison Ross and Kemp  Principles of Instructional Design Chapters 8 & 9 EVALUATION Complete the content analysis phase of Instructional Design for your project that you chose. You should deliver the following. Content Analysis Facts or Verbal information All facts identified 1-5 Concepts All Required concepts identified and broken down 1-5 Principles and Rules All Required principles identified and broken down 1-5
    • 9 Procedures All Required procedures identified and broken down 1-5 3. Design: Objectives & Strategies: Weeks 4 & 5 Rationale The old maxim holds. If you do not know where you’re going:  Any road will take you there  It does not matter where you end up  You have already arrived  DON’T START. Objectives save you from all that. Objectives At the end of this lesson you will be able to: 1. Specify Objectives at all levels in all domains 2. Package Objectives into Lessons 3. Develop strategies for Teaching Content Design – Objectives  Classification of Objectives –  Cognitive Domain Taxonomy o Knowledge o Comprehension o Application o Analysis o Synthesis o Evaluation  Affective Domain Taxonomy  Receiving  Responding  Valuing  Organizing  Characterizing  Psychomotor Domain  Imitation  Manipulation  Precision
    • 10  Articulation  Naturalization  Writing Objectives  For the Cognitive Domain  For the Affective Domain  For the Psychomotor Domain o Development of Strategies  Strategies for objectives at all levels in cognitive domain  Strategies for objectives at all levels in affective domain  Strategies for objectives at all levels in psychomotor domain o Strategies  Opening (Gaining Attention)  Material Presentation  Recall Activities  Learning Verification Activities  Reinforcement Activities  Motivational Activities  Differentiated Activities  Closure / Transfer Evaluation Develop the following: 1. Write Three Objectives using one of the following groupings. Note these objectives will be the objectives for a lesson that you will design a. Two Objectives in the cognitive Domain One at the Comprehension Level, One Above the comprehension level, and One at any level in the Affective Domain b. One objective in the cognitive Domain above the knowledge level, One at any level in the Psychomotor Domain and one at any level in the Affective Domain c. Two Objectives at different levels in the Psychomotor Domain, and One at any level in the Affective Domain
    • 11 Rubric for Objectives & Strategies A. Present Matches Content Correct ID of Domain and Level Correct according to ABC or MRK Strategies Match Content Strategies Match Objective Comprehension 2 2 2 2 2 2 Above Comprehension 2 2 2 2 2 2 Affective 2 2 2 2 2 2 B Present Matches Content Correct ID of Domain and Level Correct according to ABC or MRK Strategies Match Content Strategies Match Objective Cognitive Above Knowledge Level 2 2 2 2 2 2 Psychomotor Any Level 2 2 2 2 2 2 Affective 2 2 2 2 2 2 C Present Matches Content Correct ID of Domain and Level Correct according to ABC or MRK Strategies Match Content Strategies Match Objective Psychomotor 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 Psychomotor 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 Affective 2 2 2 2 2 2 Total Possible 36. This is to be reduced to out of 10. E.g 18/36 of 10 = 5 Research  Principles of Instructional Design – Gagne  Morrison Ross and Kemp
    • 12 2. Evaluation, Development & Implementation: Weeks 6 & 7 In this section you will: 1. Write the Assessment instruments for your three Objectives 2. Develop an implementation plan 3. Develop One Lesson Plan 3.1 Developing Assessment Instruments. Writing assessment instruments. 1. Multiple Choice Questions 2. Essay type Questions 3. Attitude questionnaires 4. Short Answers 5. Interviews 6. Observation 7. True or false The assessment instrument/s must be able to assess achievement of the objectives you have written. 3.2 Implementation Plan Determine all the preparation you must make before commencement of the lesson Some examples follow. This list is not exhaustive. a. Establish the timetable for the course rollout b. Schedule the courses, enrol learners, and reserve on-site and off-site classrooms c. Notify learners d. Notify supervisors e. Select trainers and prepare them with a train-the-trainer session f. Develop procedure for training the facilitators g. Arrange for delivery course workbooks to the class site h. Ensure all sites have resources required such as internet-ready computers i. Arrange shipping for equipment and resources where necessary, to arrive in good time. Manage travel and expenses for the trainers and/or learners j. Prepare learners: i. Student registration ii. Training them on new tools (software or hardware), k. Ensure materials are available and functional l. Ensure equipment is available m. CD-ROMs and software are in place, n. Learning application or Web site is functional.
    • 13 3.3 Develop ONE Lesson Plan A Lesson plan should at least contain the following elements. Using the elements in your Instructional Design develop a Lesson Plan containing the following elements: Lesson Plans Rubric 2 Marks – The item is appropriate to the Lesson 1 Mark – The item is present but inappropriate to the Lesson 0 Mark – The item is missing 2 1 0 The Plan Author Date Subject Area Topic/Title Lesson Description Audience Description Grade/Level/Standard Prior Skills Goals and Objectives Goals/Aims Specific Objectives Materials and Tools Needed Physical Resources Human Resources Materials Technologies Teacher Activities Opening (Gaining Attention) Material Presentation Recall Activities Learning Verification Activities Reinforcement Activities Motivational Activities Differentiated Activities
    • 14 Students’ Activities Closure / Transfer Learning Demonstration Activities Reflective Assessment How will you assess how well you have done? How will you assess how well the student has done? How will you assess the effectiveness of the lesson? Research  Chapter 12 – Designing the Individual Lesson – Principles of Instructional Design  Morrison Ross and Kemp – Message design Evaluation/Assessment 1. Develop assessment instruments for all your objectives 2. Develop the implementation plan 3. Develop ONE Lesson plan
    • 15 Assessment instrument. Rubrics A Assessment Question Present Matches Content Matches the Objective Comprehension 2 2 2 Above Comprehension 2 2 2 Total Possible 12 B Assessment Question Present Matches Content Matches the Objective Above Knowledge 2 2 2 Psychomotor 2 2 2 Total Possible 12 C Assessment Question Present Matches Content Matches the Objective Psychomotor 1 2 2 2 Psychomotor 2 2 2 2 Total Possible 12 Total Possible 12 Evaluation is worth 5 Marks Implementation Rubric 5 – Plan is workable and provisions made are appropriate for the lesson 4 – Plan lacks few provisions but is workable and appropriate 3 – Plan lacks few provisions but is somewhat inappropriate 2 – Major absence of provisions and inappropriate 0 – 1 Plan is totally useless, does not male sense
    • 16 Final Project Develop an Instructional design unit for a topic of instruction of your choice. (It may be an entirely new topic or the same one that you have been working with during the term. It can be a seamless integration of all the work you have already done or a completely new piece). The Unit Must Contain 1. Analysis a. Needs Analysis Report and Instructional Problem 05 b. Context Analysis 05 c. Content Analysis 05 2. Design a. Objectives 05 b. Strategy 05 3. Development, a. One Lesson Plan 05 b. Assessment Plan 05 c. Implementation Plan 05 COURSE POLICIES Assignment Dates 1. Assignment 2 a. All Analyses Week 3 b. All Designs Week 5 c. Lesson Plan, Assessment, Implementation and Project Week 7 Assignments are due at Mid Night on the day of your class of the week the assignment becomes due i.e. The week of July 7th and must be submitted as required by your lecturer. Late Submissions Late submissions will be accepted with a penalty of 1 Mark from the total mark of the assignment for every day late up to seven (7) days after due date. Thereafter NO late submissions will be accepted. Identification All assignments must be submitted with a cover page that clearly displays the following information: University Name; Programme Name; Course Name and Course Code; Student Name; Student Identification Number; Submission Date; Instructor Name; Assignment Number, Name or Type. Example Cover Page:
    • 17 University of Trinidad and Tobago School for Studies in Learning Cognition and Education EDFN201B – Instructional Design Student Name: JANE DOE Student ID: 010101010101 Assignment Due Date: 13th May, 2009 Assignment: 1 – Instructional Software Evaluation Instructor: DR JAMES DOE Plagiarism and/or Academic Dishonesty There is a ZERO tolerance of plagiarism and/or academic dishonesty i.e: Any act or behaviour done with the intent of deceiving, misleading or defrauding with the purpose of acquiring marks or avoiding not losing marks. Students found guilty may be subjected to the due discipline as prescribed by the University of Trinidad and Tobago. Submission Format All work is to be submitted using standard 8.5 X 11 (white/off white paper) with portrait orientation. Individual lecturers will prescribe further presentation/binding preference. All work should conform to the APA Referencing format which can be found at: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/ . Portfolio All work should be submitted in a final portfolio and should include all course work submitted, properly sequenced, labelled and identified. Penalties Any work submitted not subscribing to the above stipulations WILL BE Returned/Rejected with due penalties for late submission. Students’ Responsibility It is your responsibility to be present at every class (for a minimum of 80% attendance) – ON Time to receive handouts or assignments. If you must be absent or late make arrangements with some one duly authorized to collect or submit your work for you. Unless a written authorization is provided no student will be allowed to collect or distribute work for another student. If you miss class do not expect the lecturer to walk with your work on every occasion. COURSE SCHEDULE Week Module Title and Session Topics Methodology Evaluation and Grading
    • 18 1 Theories and Models - Class discussions - Group interaction - Lecture - Complete Lesson 2-3 Analysis - Class discussions - Group interaction - Lecture Lecture/discussion - Complete Analysis 4-5 Design - Class discussions - Group interaction - Lecture - Complete Design 6-7 Implementation, Assessment, Lesson Plan Project Submission - Class discussions - Group interaction - Lecture - Complete Implementation RECOMMENDED READING  Principles of Instructional Design by Gagne, Wager, Kolas and Keller (5th Ed)  Designing Effective Instruction by Morrison Ross and Kemp