NWABR Cultural Considerations in Classroom Dialogue


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90 Minute session delivered to educators attending the NWABR Ethics in the Science Classroom workshop. What keeps us from having dialogues about controversial or difficult topics in the classroom? How do practices like norm setting, studying cultural value differences, or dialoguing help ALL students become more inclusive, skilled, and informed?

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NWABR Cultural Considerations in Classroom Dialogue

  1. 1. NWABR Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Seattle Girls’ School Cultural Considerations in Classroom Dialogue Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  2. 2. About Seattle Girls’ School Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  3. 3. What’s the Worry? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  4. 4. Goals  Create Norms for the Workshop  Understand how identity, culture, and values affect our behaviors  Identify elements of respectful dialogue Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  5. 5. Setting Norms  What do you need to feel safe in discussing controversial or difficult issues?  What ground rules would be helpful in ensuring safe and effective dialogue? PROCESS 2 minute individual time 7 minute small group time 10 minute all group time Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  6. 6. Example Norms from NWABR Curriculum  A bioethics discussion is not a competition or a debate with a winner and a loser  Everyone will respect the different viewpoints expressed  If conflicts arise during discussion, they must be resolved in a manner that retains everyone’s dignity  Everyone has an equal voice  Interruptions are not allowed and no one person is allowed to dominate the discussion  All are responsible for following and enforcing the rules  Critique ideas, not people  Assume good intent Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  7. 7. Dimensions of Identity and Culture This model of identifiers and culture was created by Karen Bradberry and Johnnie Foreman for NAIS Summer Diversity Institute, adapted from Loden and Rosener’s Workforce America! (1991) and from Diverse Teams at Work, Gardenswartz & Rowe (SHRM 2003). Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  8. 8. Individual - Collectivistic Low Context - High Context Task - Relationship Low Uncertainty - High Uncertainty Vertical - Horizontal Dimensions of Variability Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  9. 9. Cultural Values Norms, and Rules  Values  Value Priorities  Norms of Behavior  Non-Verbal Communication Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  10. 10. CulturalValueDifferences RELATIONAL Individualism self-reliance, independence (selfish) Collectivism group interdependence (mindless follower) Informality directness, give and take discussion (rude and abrupt) Formality indirectness, protect "face" (stiff and impersonal) Competition individual achievement (egotistical, show-off) Cooperation group achievement (avoiding doing work or taking responsibility) AUTHORITY Egalitarianism fairness, belief in equal opportunity (being picky, on a soapbox) Hierarchy privilege of status or rank (power hungry or avoiding accountability) TEMPORAL Use of Time "Time is money" (doesn’t get the important things in life) Passage of Time "Time is for life" (lazy and irresponsible) Change/Future Adaptability ensures survival (muckraker, stirs up trouble) Tradition/Past Stability ensures survival (old-school, afraid of change) ACTIVITY Action orientation "Make things happen" (rushes without thinking) "Being" orientation "Let things happen" (indecisive and slow) Practicality Efficiency is always best (impersonal and unscrupulous) Idealism Always maintain principles (naïve and impractical) Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  11. 11. Exercise: Non-Verbal Violations 1: Please pick a partner and stand. 2: Begin to converse about your hobbies and interests. 3: You will receive a piece of paper describing nonverbal behaviors. 4: Scan the piece of paper. Do not share the information. 5: INCREMENTALLY dramatize the nonverbal behavior. 6: Make note of thoughts or feelings you experience. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  12. 12. Debrief: Nonverbal Violations Did the INTENT of your described behaviors allow you to display them more enthusiastically? What was the IMPACT of the behaviors of your partner? Did knowing that “odd” behaviors may be part of the exercise help you accept your partner’s behavior? In working and living with people from various communities, what do you take away from this exercise? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  13. 13. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee) Dialoguing Across Differences
  14. 14. Effective Communication Models Common Threads Brenda J. Allen, Difference Matters: Communicating Social Identity SUPPORTIVE DEFENSIVE Description Evaluation Problem-Orientation Control Spontaneity Strategy Empathy Neutrality Equality Superiority Provisionalism Certainty Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  15. 15. Ethics, Dialogue, and Value-Based Education = Multicultural Education  Critical Thinking  Multiple Perspectives  Difference as Value Added not as “Problem”  Values and Stereotype Threat  Respectful Conflict Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  16. 16. Final Questions or Comments? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  17. 17. Presenter Information Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee 6th Faculty and Professional Outreach Seattle Girls’ School 2706 S Jackson Street Seattle WA 98144 (206) 805-6562 rlee@seattlegirlsschool.org http://tiny.cc/rosettalee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  18. 18. Communication Resources • “Stereotype Threat” by Joshua Aronson • Brenda J. Allen, Difference Matters: Communicating Social Identity • William Gudykunst, Cross-Cultural and Intercultural Comunication • Milton Bennett, PhD, Intercultural Communication Institute www.intercultural.org • “Non-Verbal Communication Across Cultures” by Erica Hagen, Intercultural Communication Resources • Thiagi.com • Thrive! Team Dynamics • http://www.analytictech.com/mb021/action_science_ history.htm Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  19. 19. Miscellaneous Resources • Karen Bradberry and Johnnie Foreman, “Privilege and Power,” Summer Diversity Institute, National Association of Independent Schools, 2009 • Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman, Nurture Shock • Kevin Jennings, GLSEN (Gay Lesbian and Straight Education Network) www.glsen.org • Allan G. Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference • Johnnie McKinley, “Leveling the Playing Field and Raising African American Students’ Achievement in Twenty-nine Urban Classrooms,” New Horizons for Learning, http://www.newhorizons.org/strategies/differentiated/ mckinley.htm Michael J Nakkula and Eric Toshalis, Understanding Youth. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)