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Brooklyn Friends School Gender and Sexuality Diversity
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90 minute session delivered to Lower School parents. Gone are days when boys are "snips and snails and puppy dog tails" and girls are "sugar and spice and everything nice"... or are they? Children ...

90 minute session delivered to Lower School parents. Gone are days when boys are "snips and snails and puppy dog tails" and girls are "sugar and spice and everything nice"... or are they? Children are barraged with messages about gender and heterosexual norms everywhere they go - their homes, their schools, the media, and more. Do you know what hidden lessons they are learning? How do parents and guardians provide safe environments for positive self esteem, healthy identity development, and acceptance of differences?

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  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Introduction - Who Am I? Why This Workshop? Goals and Outcomes?
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Keep in Mind - material speaks in generalities and norms. Girls and boys can fall outside of the information given, and they are completely normal. Making blanket assumptions are dangerous, and norms do not define normal or good. Gender norms can easily become Sexism. Adolescent norms can easily become adultism.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee John Medina - Talaris Institute Watching boys and girls play. Boys play together through competition (Oh yeah? I bet I can toss the ball higher than you!) Girls play collaboratively (Can you toss the ball as high as me? Let ’s try a little higher). Mix boys and girls (G-Wanna toss the ball? B-I bet I can toss the ball higher than you! G-You must not like me… B-What happened?) Rachel Simmons - Odd Girl Out Response to danger. Boys choose “fight or flight.” Girls choose “tend and befriend.” Males see aggression as a way to control their world, females see aggression as an end to relationships. Mary Pipher - Reviving Ophelia Boys see their failure in terms of external factors and see their success in terms of their ability. Girls see their success in terms of luck and hard work and see their failure in terms of lack of ability. Power Dead Even - women/girls will do anything to bring down another woman/girl to their level
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Cannot attribute all to gender differences. Gender bias plays a huge role. We socialize kids into these behaviors. What happens when boys display behavior on left? “Boys will be boys…” What happens when girls display behavior on right? “Sugar and Spice and Everything Nice!” What happens when gender behaviors don’t match gender expectations? Boys are pushed into sports, fights, getting dirty, building things, scientific investigation by adults and pushed down by peers with words like “Sissy, girl, pussy, fag.” Girls are told to play nice, share, be ladylike, punished harsher for fighting, complimented on looks by adults and put down by peers with words like “butch, jock, bitch, dyke.” Rachel Simmons - Odd Girl Out Ideal girl according to girls = very thin, pretty, blonde, fake, stupid, tall, blue eyes, big boobs, fit, expensive clothes, un-proportional, naked, trendy, popular, boyfriends, smiling, happy, helpless, talking on the phone, superficial conflicts, looks older, girlie, dependent, impractical clothes, manipulative, sex = power, rich, good teeth/clear skin, smart, perfect, romantically attached with someone with status. Anti-girl according to girls = mean, ugly, excessively cheerful, athletic, brainy, opinionated, pushy, dark features, not skinny, imperfections, promiscuous, professional, insecure, dorky, depressed/unhappy, masculine, serious, strong, independent, gay/lesbian, artsy, PMSish, unrestrained, egocentric, not social, hard to get along with, bookish.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 1. Stereotype - A preconceived or oversimplified generalization about an entire group of people without regard for their individual differences. While often negative, stereotypes may also be complimentary. Even positive stereotypes can have a negative impact however, simply because they are broad generalizations. The stereotypes we hold form the basis of our prejudices. 2. Prejudice - A conscious or unconscious negative belief about a whole group of people and its individual members. When the person holding the prejudice also has and uses the power to deny opportunities, resources or access to a person because of their group membership, there is discrimination. 3. Discrimination - Prejudice plus the power. Discrimination can take many forms, including racism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, ageism, etc. Many acts of discrimination build up over time, perpetuated against one relatively less powerful social group by a more powerful social group, lead to a group of people being in a state of oppression. 4. Oppression - The systematic subjugation of a group of people by another group of people with access to social power, the result of which benefits one group over the other and is maintained by social beliefs and practices. Because oppression is institutionalized in our society, target group members often believe the messages and internalize the oppression. 5. Internalized Oppression - The "buying into" the elements of oppression by the target group. When target group members believe the stereotypes they are taught about themselves, they tend to act them out and thus perpetuate the stereotypes which reinforces the prejudice and keeps the cycle going.
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee U.S. advertisers spent $235.6 billion in 2009 (80% of countries in the world have GDPs less than this).
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Final Tidbits: -teach first and refer to later. We have a tendency to see it happen & react with education. -there are times and places for interventions. What is important is that SOMETHING is done in the moment, and that there is ALWAYS follow-up -don ’t let girls get away with a quick “sorry.” they know how to please adults. Get authentic conversation out of them. -practice, practice, practice. The more clever, poignant, and effective language comes out on the third try :-)
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
  • Gender, Bias, and Aggression 01/18/12 Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee

Brooklyn Friends School Gender and Sexuality Diversity Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Brooklyn Friends School Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Seattle Girls ’ School What Boys and Girls Are Made of: Supporting Healthy Gender and Sexual Identities of Children Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 2. About Seattle Girls ’ School Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 3. Introductions Warm-Up Questions Please introduce yourself with your name, your child, and your child’s grade. What brought you to today’s session? What would you like to get out of our session today? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 4. Agenda
    • Gender Differences
    • Gender Bias
    • Gender Bias and Girls
    • Gender Bias and Boys
    • Gender and Sexuality Paradigm
    • What Can We Do?
    • Discussions
    • Resources
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 5. Disclaimers and Other Food for Thought Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 6. Gender Differences Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 7.
    • Brash
    • Troublemaker
    • Strong
    • Competitive
    • Physical
    • Silent
    • Clever
    • Mistake-Prone
    • Belligerent
    • Intuitive
    • Well-Behaved
    • Delicate
    • Cooperative
    • Emotional
    • Verbal
    • Pretty
    • Perfect
    • Nice
    Gender Bias Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 8. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 9. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 10. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 11. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 12. Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 13. Girls and Gender Bias Where Does it Lead? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 14. The “Good Girl” in Conflict Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 15. The “Good Girl” in the Workplace and Home Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 16. Beauty Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee) The “Pretty Girl” on Beauty
  • 17. Boys and Gender Bias Where Does it Lead? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 18. The “Tough Guy” in Conflict Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 19. The “Tough Guy” in the Workplace and the Home Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 20. Psychic Dissonance, Health, and Violence Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 21. Gender and Sexuality Paradigm Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 22. Process Break My child is MOSTLY: -internalizing and conforming to gender norms and stereotypes -feeling pressured to conform to gender stereotypes -little affected by gender stereotypes -actively non-conforming to gender stereotypes Please gather in affinity groups. Meet, chat, clarify. What are the positives and negatives of where your child is, as far as you can tell? What are the specific questions or concerns that come up for your child ? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 23. What Can We Do? Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 24. What Can Parents Do for Girls?
    • Teach the difference between self-sacrificing and good.
    • Talk about or compliment something besides her looks.
    • Value the quality of her relationships, not the quantity.
    • Give her access to diverse women mentors.
    • Role-Play difficult conversations with her.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 25. What Can Parents Do for Boys?
    • Teach the difference between strong and tough.
    • Talk about feelings and relationships.
    • Make it okay to be vulnerable.
    • Give him access to diverse male mentors.
    • Help them understand societal homophobia.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 26. What Can Parents Do for All?
    • Help them develop strong interaction and social skills.
    • • Discuss nontraditional family and relationship models.
    • • Show them diverse role models of all GSD identities.
    • • Encourage and help them to make informed choices.
    • Teach about gender and sexuality diversity.
    • Give them healthy outlets for their feelings.
    • Respect and nurture their true selves.
    • Teach “norm”, “normal”, and “ good ” .
    • Share your stories.
    • Model the way.
    • Stay Involved.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 27. Teach Media Literacy
    • Choose media FOR youth whenever possible.
    • Engage in media WITH youth.
    • Teach them your values.
    • Guide how they spend their money.
    • Get to know their friends and the media they engage in.
    • Talk to other parents/guardians about media literacy.
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://sites.google.com/site/sgsprofessionaloutreach/)
  • 28. Undoing Gender Bias Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 29. Questions and Comments Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 30. Presenter Information
    • Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee
    • 6th Faculty and
    • Professional Outreach
    • Seattle Girls ’ School
    • 2706 S Jackson Street
    • Seattle WA 98144
    • (206) 805-6562
    • [email_address]
    • http://tiny.cc/rosettalee
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 31. Resources
    • Joshua M. Aronson, Ph.D., “Improving Achievement & Narrowing the Gap,” Learning and the Brain Conference, Cambridge, MA, November 2003
    • Allan G. Johnson, Privilege, Power, and Difference.
    • Miss Representation , documentary film on media and women
    • United Nations Population Fund Statistics on Gender Equality as of 2005 http://www.unfpa.org/swp/2005/presskit/factsheets/facts_gender.htm
    • Learning to be critically literate of mass media http://www.medialit.org /
    • Media Guide for Parents and Educators http://www.commonsensemedia.org /
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)
  • 32. Gender Specific Resources
    • Jennifer Bryan, various trainings and publications on gender and sexuality diversity, From the Dress Up Corner to the Senior Prom
    • JoAnn Deak, Ph.D., Girls Will Be Girls: Raising Confident and Courageous Daughters, How Girls Thrive
    • Jackson Katz, Tough Guise, Wrestling with Manhood, The Macho Paradox
    • John Medina, Talaris Research Institute, various studies on early gender differences in competition and play
    • Mary Pipher, Ph.D., Reviving Ophelia: Saving the Selves of Adolescent Girls
    • Rachel Simmons, Odd Girl Out, Odd Girl Speaks Out, Curse of the Good Girl
    • Michael Thompson, Raising Cain, Speaking of Boys, It’s a Boy!
    Rosetta Eun Ryong Lee (http://tiny.cc/rosettalee)