• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Testing Content: Early, Often, & Well
 

Testing Content: Early, Often, & Well

on

  • 15,438 views

You've heard about testing design. What about testing content? This presentation walks through a case study of testing content with people and offers key testing takeaways.

You've heard about testing design. What about testing content? This presentation walks through a case study of testing content with people and offers key testing takeaways.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
15,438
Views on SlideShare
15,272
Embed Views
166

Actions

Likes
34
Downloads
192
Comments
1

9 Embeds 166

http://www.leenjones.com 77
http://www.weebly.com 44
http://lostandfound.posterous.com 14
http://www.slideshare.net 11
http://greenlifeadvocacy.weebly.com 10
http://paper.li 4
http://www.linkedin.com 4
http://ccpideaexchange.blogspot.com 1
https://www.coursesites.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • A podcast of this presentation is available at the STC Learning Center: http://www.softconference.com/stc/sessionDetail.asp?SID=184821#
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Testing Content: Early, Often, & Well Testing Content: Early, Often, & Well Presentation Transcript

    • Testing Content Early, Often, & Well Colleen Jones Kevin O’Connor colleen@content-science.com koconnor@userinsight.com
    • Testing design. You’ve probably heard of it. It’s good. But, it’s not enough.
    • We’ve talked about testing content for years, but as an industry...
    • “ Too many usability tests focus ONLY on finding information— “ not on how the information [content] itself works for people. Ginny Redish
    • What we mean by “content.” “ Content includes the text, graphics, video, & audio “ that make up an interactive experience. Kristina Halvorson
    • THE SITUATION
    • CDC Travelers’ Health wanted to assess their content.  
    • TREND: Content is critical to the health industry. “ …providers of online health resources can increase the relevance & influence of their Web sites if they •  focus on site usability, •  bolster the credibility of their content, & “ •  bridge the gap between Web & point of care.
 Who Cares About Online Health Content? Forrester Research
    • The site is a big opportunity to improve health decisions through content. •  Top 5 most popular CDC websites •  In 2009 •  9.5 million visits •  31 million page views
    • “ With such rich content on our site, I was concerned about the number of people “ who were calling because they couldn’t find vaccine information. Kelly Holton Communication & Education Team Lead Travelers’ Health, CDC
    • “ I knew it was time to do something different to help drive our content strategy. “ I felt we needed to find out what users really think about & do with our content. Kelly Holton Communication & Education Team Lead Travelers’ Health, CDC
    • CDC had clear objectives.   •  Gather feedback about different user groups’… •  Content needs & preferences. •  Perspectives on content quality, presentation, & format. •  Create a content and usability testing model.
    • OUR APPROACH
    • Testing content helps you choose the right content direction.
    • We tested content iteratively.   Baseline Test Concepts Validation Test
    • BASELINE TEST
    • We focused on a critical content sample: DESTINATIONS  
    • We tested with these user groups. Travelers   Travel  Medicine   Consumers  who  do  or  do   Professionals   not  research  health-­‐related   Doctors,  clinic  admins,   informa3on  before   nurses,  &  specialists   traveling  to  foreign   provide  travel  health   countries  (N=12)   informa3on  &  care  (N=6)   Healthcare  Professionals   Travel  Professionals   Doctors,  nurses,  &   Travel  &  tourism  industry   pharmacists  who  are  in  a   representa3ves  (e.g.,  travel   posi3on  to  provide  travel   agents,  tour  organizers,   health-­‐related  informa3on   etc.)  (N=6)   &  care  (N=12)  
    • We observed & interviewed people one-on-one.   We needed a deep understanding of WHY.
    • Our protocol focused on key content questions…   Can users… •  Find & read the content they need? •  Understand the content? •  Act on the content?
    • We learned a lot.   Can they find & read it? NO •  Users couldn’t find vaccinations. Do they understand it? PARTLY •  Users were not sure whether the content was specific to the destination. •  Users were distracted by & misunderstood "Travel Notices.” Can & will they act on it? NO •  Users trusted CDC but… •  Felt overwhelmed by the content. •  Were confused about which vaccinations were required, necessary, or most relevant to their level of risk. •  Were not clear on the next step they should take.
    • TMI PORTABLE FORMATS? CONFUSING DATES RISK LEVELS? AMBIGUOUS LANGUAGE HARD-TO-READ FORMATS
    • Lost in Content  
    • We recommended focusing on travelers. •  Other sections, such as Yellow Book, addressed travel Travelers   medicine professionals better. Consumers  who  do  or  do   not  research  health-­‐related   informa3on  before   •  80 / 20 rule applies. traveling  to  foreign   countries  (N=12)   •  Health professionals & travel professionals act as catalysts or referrals.
    • THE CONCEPTS
    • Travelers need to decide…   •  Whether they are at risk. •  What shots to get. •  How to get shots. •  How to avoid common diseases. •  What health items to bring. •  More
    • “ “ Design from the content out. Jeffrey Zeldman That’s exactly what we did.  
    • We explored content…   •  Organization & priority •  Layering & layout •  Writing style & tone •  Calls to action
    • 5 organization schemes Priority on vaccinations
    • Tone & language Rhetorical / psychological framing  
    • Layering / progressive disclosure Decision table
    • Call to action
    • Then, we tried variations. Concept 1 Concept 2 Layering & •  Less intro instruction •  More intro instruction layout •  Tabs •  Reveal •  More explanation in •  Less explanation in vaccination summary vaccination summary Calls to action •  Bold buttons •  Contextual text Style & tone •  More familiar •  Less familiar
    • Does this content work better for travelers?  
    • TESTING THE CONCEPTS
    • We tested 2 concepts + the original.   “ …by presenting users with alternative…solutions, subjective ratings are less prone to inflation & “ give rise to more & stronger criticisms. −Getting the Right Design & the Design Right CHI 2006
    • The protocol was similar to the baseline.   •  Can they find and read it? •  Do they understand it? •  Will they act on it?
    • We didn’t expect a “winner,” just better feedback.  
    • We followed best testing techniques.   •  Tested on a small scale. •  Avoided order bias. •  Followed a discussion guide. •  Took time stamped notes & looked at patterns of behaviors.
    • The concepts tested better.   Can they find it? YES Do they understand it? MOSTLY •  Users understood the vaccination content but…. •  Asked for more explanation of the ratings. •  Were still distracted by & misunderstood "Travel Notices.” Can and will they act on it? YES •  Users preferred more explanation in the decision table. •  Users knew the next step they should take. •  Despite tone & framing, users still trusted the content.
    • Preference for Concept  
    • What’s Next •  Testing •  Evaluation 1 •  Analysis 2 •  Concept 3 • Refinement 4 •  Quality Plan Create •  Testing Deliver •  Testing Govern •  Synthesis Control Process  Inspired  by  Content  Strategy  for  the  Web  
    • We’re not done, but we know we’re on the right track.    
    • Top Takeaways for Testing Content   1.  Test the content early in a project, then iteratively. 2.  Test for whether people can use, understand, and act on the content. 3.  Test using a mix of concrete tasks & exploratory questions. 4.  Test with the right people. 5.  Test more than one concept for the best feedback.
    • Find out whether your content works for people. And learn all you can from the journey.
    • Questions? Colleen Jones Kevin O’Connor colleen@content-science.com koconnor@userinsight.com
    • Acknowledgments   •  Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) •  Oak Ridge Associated Universities •  Kim Ware, Content Science •  Karen Williams, User Insight