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Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
Creative Commons
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Creative Commons

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Creative Commons, its history, pros and cons

Creative Commons, its history, pros and cons

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  • Not an alternative- works alongside the copyright allowing you to modify copyright terms to best suit your needs.
  • Began in 2001 at Stanford Law School Started by experts including Michael Carroll, Molly Shaffer Van Houweling, Lawrence Lessig and more C.C first project was in December 2002, where it released its first set of copyright licenses for free to the public This was helped by Free Software Foundation’s GNY General Public License alongside a web application platform
  • Main things of interest are the increasing number of licenses there are since it began in 2001. So it went from 1 million licenses in 2002 through to 130 million in 2008.
  • Open source works with CC to improve the flow of user-created information. This related to web 2.0 as it is a platform aimed at inspiring user generated content to be available to the public, to be modified by the public and to be used by the public.
  • Attribution: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your copyrighted work — and derivative works based upon it — but only if they give credit the way you request. Non-commercial: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform your work — and derivative works based upon it — but for non-commercial purposes only. No derivative works: You let others copy, distribute, display, and perform only verbatim copies of your work, not derivative works based upon it Share-Alike: You allow others to distribute derivative works only under a license identical to the license that governs your work
  • Attribution: This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered, in terms of what others can do with your works licensed under Attribution. Attribution non-commercial: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same term Attribution share-alike: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial reasons, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. This license is often compared to open source software licenses. All new works based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also allow commercial use. Attribution no derivatives: This license allows for redistribution, commercial and non-commercial, as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to you. Attribution non-commercial share alike: This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms. Others can download and redistribute your work just like the by-nc-nd license, but they can also translate, make remixes, and produce new stories based on your work. All new work based on yours will carry the same license, so any derivatives will also be non-commercial in nature. Attribution non-commercial no derivatives: This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, allowing redistribution. This license is often called the “free advertising” license because it allows others to download your works and share them with others as long as they mention you and link back to you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.
  • Ireland CC- CC working with University College Cork to create Ireland jurisdiction. Creating specific licenses from the generic CC licenses.
  • -This is an example of the non-exclusivity clause in the license. Where it gets sticky on the Internet is that if you publish a song under one license and it gets downloaded--even if you subsequently rerelease the song with a different license--an infinite number of copies of the first download can potentially be shared under the original license. So, according to the Creative Commons FAQ if there are two different non-exclusive licenses covering the same work on the Internet the user can generally choose which to follow. - If CC were to win a case over copyright then effectively the public could pay the price as ‘fair use’ would be eroded. There are arguments to suggest that the fair use term from the copyrights act means that non commercial licences set by CC can be ignored due to fair use., meaning certain works could be used for commercial use.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Leena Marsh
    • 2. <ul><li>Creative Commons is a non-profit organization </li></ul><ul><li>working to increase the amount of creativity in </li></ul><ul><li>the commons. </li></ul><ul><li>“ the commons— the body of work that is available to the public for free and legal sharing, use, repurposing, and remixing” </li></ul><ul><li>http://creativecommons.org/about/what-is-cc </li></ul>What is it?
    • 3. <ul><li>Creative Commons defines the spectrum of possibilities between full copyright (all rights reserved) and the public domain (no rights reserved) </li></ul><ul><li>It is not an alternative for copyright </li></ul><ul><li>CC licences allow creators to retain copyright, while inviting certain uses of the work, a &quot;some rights reserved&quot; copyright </li></ul>
    • 4. History <ul><li>Housed at Stanford Law School </li></ul><ul><li>Started by legal, academic and business specialists in cyberlaw/IP, computer science, documentary filmmaking and public domain web-publishing </li></ul><ul><li>Aimed at developing content, web sites and applications rather than programming </li></ul>
    • 5. <ul><li>2001- Creative Commons founded </li></ul><ul><li>2002- Version 1.0 licenses released </li></ul><ul><li>2003 - Approximately 1 million licenses in use </li></ul><ul><li>2004 - Estimated 4.7 million licensed works </li></ul><ul><li>Version 2.0 released </li></ul><ul><li>2005- Estimated 20 million works </li></ul><ul><li>Version 2.5 released </li></ul><ul><li>2006- Estimated 50 million licensed works </li></ul><ul><li>2007- Estimated 90 million licensed works </li></ul><ul><li>Version 3.0 released </li></ul><ul><li>2008- Estimated 130 million CC licensed works </li></ul><ul><li>New Nine Inch Nails album released under CC </li></ul><ul><li>2009- CC0 launched </li></ul>
    • 6. Who uses CC? Nine Inch Nails: The Slip Album Cover
    • 7. Open Source and CC <ul><li>Open source and CC have one main thing in common: </li></ul><ul><li>Both aim to increase the amount of creativity available online </li></ul>
    • 8. CC Licence Elements <ul><li>Attribution: The work is made available to the public with the baseline rights, but the author must receive full credit </li></ul><ul><li>Non-commercial: The work can be copied, displayed and distributed by the public, but only if these actions are for non-commercial purposes </li></ul><ul><li>No derivative works: This licence grants baseline rights, but it does not allow derivative works to be created from the original </li></ul><ul><li>Share-Alike: Derivative works can be created and distributed based on the original, but only if the same type of licence is used, which generates a “viral” licence </li></ul>
    • 9. The 6 main CC Licences by Attribution by-nc Attribution-NonCommercial by-sa Attribution-Share Alike by-nd Attribution-No Derivatives by-nc-sa Attribution-Non-commercial-Share Alike by-nc-nd Attribution-Non-Commercial-No Derivatives
    • 10. Other Types of licence <ul><li>Sampling licence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sampling </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sampling Plus: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-Commercial Sampling Plus </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Public Domain Dedication </li></ul><ul><li>Founders Copyright </li></ul><ul><li>Music Sharing licence </li></ul><ul><li>Developing Nations licence </li></ul><ul><li>Creative Commons also recommends two open source software licences for those licensing software </li></ul><ul><ul><li>GNU General Public licence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>GNU Lesser Public licence </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. The Licence
    • 12. Licence Formats <ul><li>Commons deed (human readable) </li></ul><ul><li>Legal licence (lawyer readable) </li></ul><ul><li>RDF/XML Machine readable </li></ul>
    • 13. Licence Metadata <ul><li>Resource Description Framework (RDF) metadata is used in the machine readable licence </li></ul><ul><li>You can also embed metadata in RSS, Audio (MP3 and Ogg), XMP (PDF, image formats), SMIL </li></ul><ul><li>Can embed non-web data </li></ul><ul><li>You can embed metadata using CC tools e.g. in MP3s using ccPublisher </li></ul>
    • 14. Accrediting Use <ul><li>The proper way to accredit use of CC-licensed work is to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>to keep intact any copyright notices for the Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>credit the author, licensor and/or other parties (such as a wiki or journal) in the manner they specify </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Include the title of the Work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>the Uniform Resource Identifier for the work if specified by the author and/or licensor </li></ul></ul>
    • 15. International CC <ul><li>CC licences originally written using an American legal model </li></ul><ul><li>The licences were popular and adopted by users all around the world </li></ul><ul><li>However, there was a possibility that there might be validity problems in some jurisdictions </li></ul><ul><li>iCommons : </li></ul><ul><ul><li>24 jurisdictions have completed licences (17/11/05) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>13 jurisdictions licences are being developed </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at least 70 local jurisdiction licenses expected </li></ul></ul>
    • 16. CC United Kingdom <ul><li>Complexities of UK law have meant the creation of two different set of licences </li></ul><ul><li>CC United Kingdom: England and Wales </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Licence ported by Programme in Comparative Media Law and Policy at Oxford University </li></ul></ul><ul><li>CC United Kingdom: Scotland </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Licence being ported by the AHRB Centre for Studies in Intellectual Property and Technology Law at Edinburgh University </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Also CC Ireland </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Creative Commons is working to create Ireland jurisdiction </li></ul></ul>
    • 17. Other CC Work <ul><li>Science Commons </li></ul><ul><li>CC Conservancy - land trust for intellectual work </li></ul><ul><li>Tools - CC Publisher, CC lookup, browser plugins </li></ul><ul><li>Searching </li></ul><ul><li>Weblog and mailing lists </li></ul><ul><li>Fundraising </li></ul><ul><li>Features on relevant artists </li></ul>
    • 18. The CC Web site http://creativecommons.org/
    • 19. Pros of CC <ul><li>Pros: </li></ul><ul><li>allows the artist to determine the ways in which other people can use their work </li></ul><ul><li>can be difficult on internet to ask permission of artist to use their work- CC license speeds up the permissions process </li></ul><ul><li>Protection from copyright infringement –CC license can be used to help prove your authorship  </li></ul>
    • 20. Cons of CC <ul><li>Once you publish a work under a CC license you can't change your mind. You can however create another license for the same work under a new licence. </li></ul><ul><li>No checks involved to manage CC licenses </li></ul><ul><li>Implication that the CC supersedes the copyrights law </li></ul>
    • 21. References <ul><li>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Creative_Commons </li></ul><ul><li>http://creativecommons.org/ </li></ul><ul><li>http://jocalling.blogspot.com/2007/08/creative-commons-pros-and-cons.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.idealware.org/blog/2008/12/creative-commons-turns-six.html </li></ul><ul><li>http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,1838244,00.asp </li></ul>
    • 22. Any Questions?

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